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Talk to me about rain gear

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Talk to me about rain gear

Old 03-31-19, 09:26 AM
  #26  
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Originally Posted by djb View Post
If I understand this, you havent seen this bike in person yet? If so, at least be realistic that even if good shape from not being used too much, its completely realistic that the remenants of the grease is original from the 80s, or the spokes aren't properly tensioned....I dont know how much bike mechanic stuff you do or are interested in, but its in your best interests to at least check or have someone check this stuff, as it could very well have implications on your trip
moral of that story, spending some money on checking/regreasing/adjusting would be well spent, and if not, could end up with costs during the trip.
That looks like a 50/40 and maybe a 28 at back. My first bike trip was on a bike of similar gearing, it might be ok for flat Yucatan, but that is pretty high gearing , so just be aware, and have shoes that are good for walking at times up hills.
It has been recently serviced. New Panaracer Pasela tires and DA cables. I realize I am breaking the first rule of the touring cyclist here, but I am also a practical guy. I AM bringing a known saddle with me. And I am training on a 79 Trek 930, 24". The new bike is a 24" 1980 Trek 414. It has narrower bars than I'm used to, but I'm confident I can adjust quickly. I ride only vintage and do all my own work, including wheels. I have no concerns about something coming up that I can't take care of. It was being ridden up until September of last year, and was well maintained throughout its life, if the original owner is to be believed. I believe him. I asked specifically about grease in the bb and headset and hubs. This is no noob you're dealing with; just a touring noob.
It is a 52/40, with 13/30 rear. I'm bringing a 13/34 in my luggage. I realize headwind is not the same as uphill. I have been training in headwind since October, and am currently training loaded. I will be as physically prepared as I can be come May first. Will I be as prepared for rain as possible? That remains to be seen. I appreciate your concerns, and if I were a noob, they would be well taken.
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Old 03-31-19, 09:59 AM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by 79pmooney View Post
I sailed the North Atlantic wearing the then new Patagonia expedition weight Capeline thermal underwear 9 of the 12 days. Life at 50 degrees. 50 degrees north, 50 degree air and 50 degree water.
Memories. Although in our case it's been more 25 out of 30 days. (12 days is a FAST passage).
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Old 03-31-19, 10:03 AM
  #28  
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Waaaaay back in the '70s, I did a lot of weekend Century rides around Central Ohio. Mid Ohio Century around Delaware (north of Columbus), TGRR was a ride around the reservoirs north of Columbus, and of course TOSRV - Columbus to Portsmouth on the Ohio River, via SR 104. My old Fuji still wore it's original 51/39 crank and a 14-28 five-speed freewheel. The hills of Eastern and Southern Ohio can be a killer if you're not ready for them! BTW if you want to avoid steep hills as much as you can, you might want to look into the canal- and rail-trails. Ohio is developing quite a network of rail-trails!

After being on a charity Century in a steady cold rain, I decided that maybe some raingear might be in order... A couple of years ago, I bought a rain jacket/pants from these guys: Waterproof Jackets from People Who Really Know Waterproof Jackets! I've only worn the jacket, so far since I really don't go out of my way to ride in the rain anymore... Mine is the non-breathable version, but they have zippered armpit vents. They also offer breathable jackets...
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Old 03-31-19, 10:18 AM
  #29  
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I think pit-zips are mandatory, for cycling, with all else being somewhat negotiable. I still like Gore-Tex, for breathablity, but haven't tried most of the newer stuff, that's similar. Can't afford to try them all, lol.
Get ready to get wet, no matter what you wear. Rain is very different in different parts of the country. 😉
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Old 03-31-19, 10:41 AM
  #30  
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Maybe I've missed it in the tread, for rain protection I think fenders are the most important, you can rest under a tree during a downpour, but then are left with wet roads that can soak you. Wether rain or not I think the red blinkies and hi vis clothing are essential, especially Eastern Ohio, WV, and southern Va where the roads are tight, turny, with lots of blind hill tops. As for riding in rain, I prefer a simple poncho - lots of ventilation here on the East coast expect the humidity to be oppressive before, during and after a rain. Gortex Jackets may work in the winter and out west but the humidity can easily worse than the rain
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Old 03-31-19, 11:13 AM
  #31  
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You might need something to prevent the backpack from flexing down in back where it can rub on the tire. Maybe a sort piece of scrap lumber would be sufficient.

A friend of mine had a very early Trek, the seatpost bolt took a non-metric allen wrench, I think it was 3/16 inch. So, if you find you lack the tool to raise or lower the seatpost, try that.

The blue trek looks like it has nutted axles, not quick release, you might need a short adjustable wrench it you have a flat.
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Old 03-31-19, 11:38 AM
  #32  
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=Cougrrcj;20862998]Waaaaay back in the '70s, I did a lot of weekend Century rides around Central Ohio. Mid Ohio Century around Delaware (north of Columbus), TGRR was a ride around the reservoirs north of Columbus, and of course TOSRV - Columbus to Portsmouth on the Ohio River, via SR 104. My old Fuji still wore it's original 51/39 crank and a 14-28 five-speed freewheel. The hills of Eastern and Southern Ohio can be a killer if you're not ready for them! BTW if you want to avoid steep hills as much as you can, you might want to look into the canal- and rail-trails. Ohio is developing quite a network of rail-trails!

After being on a charity Century in a steady cold rain, I decided that maybe some raingear might be in order... A couple of years ago, I bought a rain jacket/pants from these guys: Waterproof Jackets from People Who Really Know Waterproof Jackets! I've only worn the jacket, so far since I really don't go out of my way to ride in the rain anymore... Mine is the non-breathable version, but they have zippered armpit vents. They also offer breathable jackets...
I'll check those guys out. I tried to buy a Carradice poncho a few minutes ago, but was unable to separate my billing from shipping address. I spent the bulk of my adult life in Athens County and have ridden TOSRV twice. 1981 and 2001. Thinking about 2021. I also rode the 2001 version of the Columbus Fall Challenge, and the second day of that one killed me. There were hills I wouldn't consider attempting on a bike. In all likelihood I will leave here with a cheap, poly poncho, and look into getting something more substantial stateside.

Tourist in MSN;20863080]You might need something to prevent the backpack from flexing down in back where it can rub on the tire. Maybe a sort piece of scrap lumber would be sufficient.
A friend of mine had a very early Trek, the seatpost bolt took a non-metric allen wrench, I think it was 3/16 inch. So, if you find you lack the tool to raise or lower the seatpost, try that.
The blue trek looks like it has nutted axles, not quick elease, you might need a short adjustable wrench it you have a flat.
There is a piece of luan in the laptop sleeve. Good eye. They ARE nutted. I'm taking a 14/15 wrench anyway, for pedals and crank puller functions. I would imagine those nuts are 15mm. And thanks for the seatpost binder reminder. I will pack a 3/16" allen.

Last edited by seedsbelize; 03-31-19 at 11:42 AM.
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Old 03-31-19, 11:49 AM
  #33  
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Originally Posted by archfotos View Post
Maybe I've missed it in the tread, for rain protection I think fenders are the most important, you can rest under a tree during a downpour, but then are left with wet roads that can soak you. Wether rain or not I think the red blinkies and hi vis clothing are essential, especially Eastern Ohio, WV, and southern Va where the roads are tight, turny, with lots of blind hill tops. As for riding in rain, I prefer a simple poncho - lots of ventilation here on the East coast expect the humidity to be oppressive before, during and after a rain. Gortex Jackets may work in the winter and out west but the humidity can easily worse than the rain
Great point but, sadly, I've never been much of a fender guy. Blinkies and hi-viz, however, I swear by.
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Old 03-31-19, 12:04 PM
  #34  
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Originally Posted by Cougrrcj View Post
Waaaaay back in the '70s, I did a lot of weekend Century rides around Central Ohio. Mid Ohio Century around Delaware (north of Columbus), TGRR was a ride around the reservoirs north of Columbus, and of course TOSRV - Columbus to Portsmouth on the Ohio River, via SR 104. My old Fuji still wore it's original 51/39 crank and a 14-28 five-speed freewheel. The hills of Eastern and Southern Ohio can be a killer if you're not ready for them! BTW if you want to avoid steep hills as much as you can, you might want to look into the canal- and rail-trails. Ohio is developing quite a network of rail-trails!

After being on a charity Century in a steady cold rain, I decided that maybe some raingear might be in order... A couple of years ago, I bought a rain jacket/pants from these guys: Waterproof Jackets from People Who Really Know Waterproof Jackets! I've only worn the jacket, so far since I really don't go out of my way to ride in the rain anymore... Mine is the non-breathable version, but they have zippered armpit vents. They also offer breathable jackets...
I'm liking this stuff. If a size large would be correct, would the XL be horribly too big? I buy XL everything is why I ask? 6' 185.
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Old 03-31-19, 01:36 PM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by seedsbelize View Post
I'm liking this stuff. If a size large would be correct, would the XL be horribly too big? I buy XL everything is why I ask? 6' 185.
But they don't seem to ship outside the US. And the Carradice debacle locked my credit card. Fortunately,my wife's is still good.
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Old 03-31-19, 05:54 PM
  #36  
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A timely post! I have been searching for an affordable (for me) rain cape / cycling poncho. I'm still debating between the rain suit vs. poncho benefits. I've never been cycling with a poncho. It seems like it would be flapping all over the place, and get really annoying. But I like the idea of covering everything while I'm riding. I've got a GAP / C&O tour planned for September, and I'll have to stay on schedule, rain or no!
I've pretty much settled on one of these two, not sure which:
USA Made Nylon (silicone impregnated -same as SilNylon?): Terrapin Ultralite Poncho / Shelter $70
British Made aluminized Nylon : https://www.ferrino.it/en/shop-en/ap....html#moreinfo €59
- I may reconsider the EXPED someone else said they use.
- and @Fiestbob s comment about the shape was new, good info.

- just a comment to @seedsbelize - I would think - just my opinion - if you don't have fenders, which I think you said you won't on the trip, then a poncho would be a bad idea. Seems like all that spray from the tires would just get thrown up inside the poncho. Maybe someone else who has actual experience can confirm that.

cheers.
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Old 03-31-19, 08:14 PM
  #37  
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Hi
I stash an emergency rain O2 hooded jacket in my seat bag. Amazon sells it for $28US. Last one saved my butt for 4 years of casual rides. Pros light waterproof. Cons not tough enough for daily use.
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Old 03-31-19, 08:37 PM
  #38  
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Originally Posted by seedsbelize View Post
It has been recently serviced. New Panaracer Pasela tires and DA cables. I realize I am breaking the first rule of the touring cyclist here, but I am also a practical guy. I AM bringing a known saddle with me. And I am training on a 79 Trek 930, 24". The new bike is a 24" 1980 Trek 414. It has narrower bars than I'm used to, but I'm confident I can adjust quickly. I ride only vintage and do all my own work, including wheels. I have no concerns about something coming up that I can't take care of. It was being ridden up until September of last year, and was well maintained throughout its life, if the original owner is to be believed. I believe him. I asked specifically about grease in the bb and headset and hubs. This is no noob you're dealing with; just a touring noob.
It is a 52/40, with 13/30 rear. I'm bringing a 13/34 in my luggage. I realize headwind is not the same as uphill. I have been training in headwind since October, and am currently training loaded. I will be as physically prepared as I can be come May first. Will I be as prepared for rain as possible? That remains to be seen. I appreciate your concerns, and if I were a noob, they would be well taken.
thats good that you are mechanically aware. A lot of people arent and buying a used bike unseen and heading off on a trip has lots of possibilities of problemas mechanicas.
Good luck with hills and such. This bike will have about a 32 gear inch low gear with the 34t you will bring (btw, do you know about the B screw or whatever it is , hopefully you can put it to the max on the rd and use the 34. If not, the 13-30 (which I have on one of my bikes, my old touring bike 7 speed, 13-30) will give 36-7 gear inches.

both of these are knee hurting low gears.
Ive done lots and lots of touring in mountains, including your neck of the woods, ish, Oaxaca, Chiapas, Guatemala, Honduras, and other countries in Europe on bikes with low gears of 21, 19 and 17 g.i and which clearly is my preference.
Even around here in Canada, I could not tour with a bike with a low gear in the range of your blue Trek. My old bike I mentioned, a 6 speed back in the 80s, I took to Vermont and around there, and it was tough often, and I had to walk at times.

I learned in about 1990 that my much younger knees just couldnt take that gearing, and I hope that the changes I did starting back then will allow my much older knees to keep on riding for another 20 years or so.

but thats my knee history and what works for me. Low cadences and putting high torque into my knees just aint a good combination.

oh, re that rain gear company, I saw and read about that company loo a few years back, looks like good, straightforward, reasonably priced stuff. I was tempted but didnt want to order unseen and cross border fees and all that. What I liked is that they use basic material, but have air vents, which really work well with my experience, and the prices are very reasonable.

good luck wth the planning and such, glad to hear that the Trek seems to be in good shape, and that you know what to look for etc.
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Old 03-31-19, 09:33 PM
  #39  
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There is the possibility that I can put a compact double on it for the Virginia ride. In the meantime, if I have to walk, so be it. It has been a seat of the pants affair from the start. And I would rather ride it and walk it than throw it in the back of a truck.
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Old 03-31-19, 10:51 PM
  #40  
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Originally Posted by seedsbelize View Post
There is the possibility that I can put a compact double on it for the Virginia ride. In the meantime, if I have to walk, so be it. It has been a seat of the pants affair from the start. And I would rather ride it and walk it than throw it in the back of a truck.
exactly, not a big deal unless there are really long hills to deal with, and even if so, then a longer walk sometimes.
By not having too much gear on the bike, at least that will help a lot, both for riding and if you do have to push sometimes. I guess once you figure out the route, you can get an idea of the ups and downs, using google maps can give you a reasonably reliable amount of climbing for some planned days, so that should help you figure what are reasonable distances to cover per day without knackering yourself.
Also, having plan A and plan B for daily distances and knowing what accommodations are around A or B, will be good too for dealing with how far to go on a given day.
I'm not familiar with the place you'll be riding, so have no idea how hilly it will be.
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Old 04-01-19, 04:13 AM
  #41  
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This is what we tour with https://www.groundeffect.co.nz/collections/mens-waterproof-shells/products/anti-cyclone-performance-cycling-jacket which has a built in hood
If i was wanting something that would fit into a jersey pocket I'd go for https://www.groundeffect.co.nz/colle...erproof-jacket
I like to plan for the worst and hope for the best. These jackets aren't cheap but we do a lot of (8-10,000 miles/year) and found that they last a long time. We toured France for 5 weeks years ago and the only rain was an afternoon sprinkle. We spent a week in Austria along the Danube and It just didn't stop raining to the extent that the Danube flooded and we had to catch a train back to Vienna. Wool is great clothing to layer. Sounds like you"ve been doing plenty of training but I'd also suggest that a Compact crank would be a good idea. The problem with places that are fairly flat is that they tend to be windy and invariably it will be a headwind. Having low enough gears so you can spin easily at 6 mph is a good thing.
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Old 04-01-19, 04:49 AM
  #42  
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Plastic bags

In a pinch, plastic bags over your socks works for a bit of waterproofing in the rain. Can Also double as warmers for the feet if needed.
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Old 04-01-19, 07:47 AM
  #43  
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I used to have a cycling-specific rain poncho, and that was handy, but when I needed something quick and cheap, I got this: https://www.amazon.com/TETON-SPORTS-...dp/B0767CRTMD/

Doubles as a tarp if you can find a place to tie it up. I camp, so sometimes it gets used to supplement my hammock tarp. Not as dual-functional when you're not actually camping. It'd big, and I have to make an effort to do something with the back so it doesn't end up the rear wheel, and I sometimes hook the front on the handlebars. If I'm careful, I can do it in a way that I might not get my arms wet, but it's usually better to assume that your arms and feet will get wet, and do what you have to to keep them warm. It's far from a perfect solution, but it gets the job done when I'm hoping for no rain, but planning for it just in case. It's currently in my commuting bag.

Ohio in April sounds potentially wet and chilly. If you don't leave prepared for rain, at least have enough water-friendly, warm layers to keep you from freezing. Good luck. Biked through Smithville, ate at The Barn, on my way from from Cleveland to Columbus last May. I like biking in that area.
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