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Loaded touring on Vintage bike

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Loaded touring on Vintage bike

Old 08-15-19, 06:12 AM
  #26  
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A little outside the age range of the original thread, but...

I have to say that this thread has made me miss my 1990 Canondale to the point I have considered trying to get it back from my daughter who has used it as a commuter, but isn't currently. I don't want to on the chance that she might use again.

I have actually been looking at eBay and lusting after 1990 105SC 7 speed components. To me that was a real sweet spot in the development of bike tech. Great looking, but still supremely functional stuff. I'd probably be a sucker for someone selling a new old stock group set like what was on my 1990 Crit bike and might over pay for one. I really loved that bike and those components. I may start collecting parts to build up another one (I have a similar vintage Canondale road race frame in the shed collecting dust that I think would suit my UL touring style ok).
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Old 08-15-19, 08:40 AM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by TiHabanero View Post
I have a 1985 Miyata 1000, but am building my own touring frame and will transfer the parts from the Miyata to my frame once it is done (almost there!). My biggest concern is the rear hub being freewheel and lack of proper axle support. On tours in the past I have bent axles, so this I am familiar with, and am trying to convince myself to build new wheels using cassette hubs. I just have a good selection of vintage parts that I feel wasteful not using them.
I have never bent an axle. Most of my mileage has been on freewheel-equipped bikes and my weight was well over 200 lbs for a lot of years. Could riding style be a factor?
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Old 08-15-19, 04:33 PM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by TiHabanero View Post
Anyone here doing loaded tours on a vintage machine of 1985 or earlier? Stock hubs, derailleurs, etc?
Sort of. Here is a 1982 Trek 720, mostly original. Upgraded with the latest trends from the early 80's! Ultra 6 freewheel, centerpull brakes, non-indexed shifting, 40 spoke, 14 ga, wheels with Phil Wood hubs. Period correct, still rolling strong :-)

1982 Trek 720, near Daytona Beach, 2019.
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Old 08-15-19, 04:34 PM
  #29  
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"Could riding style be a factor?"

On the old mountain bikes, no question it was a matter of beating the heck out of the thing. Cassettes were not a thing quite yet. On the touring bike, the bent axles came from 40 pounds of gear and 200 lbs of rider all on the back wheel. No big deal to replace, however should the axle fail completely out in the middle of the pan handle of TX, that will be a problem.

Having a thing for old bike stuff is becoming less practical every day I think about this, and I don't want to give it up! Looks like the smart thing to do is go cassette.
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Old 08-15-19, 08:37 PM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by andrewclaus View Post

I sold it to a guy going touring in Cuba who planned on leaving the bike there as a donation. I thought that was cool.
I bought 2 old bikes this summer. A CCM echo 15 speed, that I plan to leave in Managua, or Cubaż or? And a Hard Rock, that I find comfortable and want to keep, so I put modern, only 7 or 10 year old parts on it.

The CCM Cost $15 and nearly $100 to make it roll. Tossed the wheels into the recycle bin.

Old frames are cool, sometimes. Old parts may not be reliable, are you a good mechanic?
Many a left over 8 or 9 speed part can be had at bargin basement prices. = A $200 xtr derailleur is about $60 now, if you like 9 speed stuff. With 12 speeds on the market now, 10speed stuff can be had for 50% or 63% off

I like to fly Interjet to central america, they like to pile bags on top of my bike, the lbs in Chajul dont have a lot of modern parts. Thus my interest in old 26ers.

Modern bikes have improved considerable in the last 10 years.


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Old 08-31-19, 10:41 AM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by TiHabanero View Post
Having a thing for old bike stuff is becoming less practical every day I think about this, and I don't want to give it up! Looks like the smart thing to do is go cassette.
I'm not sure this is the case. I keep a stock of spares on hand from ebay, Craigslist, etc. Most of it is much easier to source than it was when these bikes were new anyway. I keep my eyes open and if a part I can use pops up (especially NOS), I'll snap it up if the price is right. Spare freewheels are a piece of cake! I do my own repair work so I really don't have worry about whether the local bike shop can accommodate the "special needs" of my vintage bikes. Of course, not everyone wants to be their own mechanic but for me, that's half the fun.

I don't typically stray too far from my home base at this point so if a critical part gives up the ghost, my wife can generally get a replacement to me. Even if I were to get farther from home, just about anything can be overnighted. And a lot of things (e.g., wheels, tires, brake shoes) can still be gotten from a bike shop on the road.

I just really enjoy riding vintage bikes and for the most part, I like to keep them as original as possible. It's worth it to me to do what I have to in order to make that practical. I probably only have about another 10-15 years of riding left in me anyway and my supply of stuff should hold out that long...
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Old 08-31-19, 11:45 AM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by stardognine View Post
Meant to say, you need at least 36 spokes for the rear wheel, more if possible. That extra weight, especially hauling water, just punishes the rear wheel. �� I'm on an old Exage hub now, with 36 spokes, which feels adequate, but I plan to look into a better wheel at some point. ��
I agree with this. I run 40-spoke rear wheels. They were stock on the '84 Miyata and Univega. The hubs are a bit of a pain to find but worth the effort. I have broken spokes in the past but never with a 40-spoke wheel.
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