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Tubeless 26 inch tires?

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Tubeless 26 inch tires?

Old 08-14-19, 09:22 PM
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chrisx
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Tubeless 26 inch tires?

I did not know how hard it is to find them.

For road and gravel roads, think Costa Rica or Nicaragua, away from most of the cars.


I am fixing up an old Hard Rock, (93?=).

I ordered alex Adventure 2 rims, tubeless ready.

The Hard Rock needs 1.9, 2.0 is pushing my luck, 1.75 perhaps, x 26 inch touring tires, for a person afraid of trucks, and high traffic roads.

Tubeless ready tires, 1.5, 1.75, 1.9, something for the back roads of Central America.

But which tires are still out there? The ones I thought were easy to get were out of stock.


If anyone cares,

I bought an old bike for $29 at the charity shop.

Something Interjet can pile bags on top of without making me cry.

Fly into San Jose, and out of Managua, no case.

It now has xt and xtr parts, 10 speed, or 9 speed era.


I need modern tires, and could use canti advice to replace the 28 year old cantis on the bike now, Shimano alivio cantis still work after all that time.




Go to the beach, it is good for your soul.
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Old 08-15-19, 03:35 AM
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Schwalbe Marathon Supreme?
https://www.schwalbetires.com/bike_t...rathon_supreme
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Old 08-15-19, 12:51 PM
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26 x 46 Surly Extraterrestrials
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Old 08-15-19, 01:05 PM
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Rene Herse "Rat Trap Pass" (54mm) and "Naches Pass" (44mm) are tubeless-compatible: https://www.renehersecycles.com/prod...tires/26-inch/ I'm a big fan of the latter model.
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Old 08-15-19, 01:40 PM
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Originally Posted by ThermionicScott View Post
Rene Herse "Rat Trap Pass" (54mm) and "Naches Pass" (44mm) are tubeless-compatible: https://www.renehersecycles.com/prod...tires/26-inch/ I'm a big fan of the latter model.
I have the Rat Trap Pass, and really like them, but they are likely too wide for the OP. But I bet the Naches Pass would be a good bet. I haven't had my Rat Trap tires long enough to know how well they wear, but they are great to ride on.
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Old 08-15-19, 04:04 PM
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Originally Posted by ThermionicScott View Post
Rene Herse "Rat Trap Pass" (54mm) and "Naches Pass" (44mm) are tubeless-compatible: https://www.renehersecycles.com/prod...tires/26-inch/ I'm a big fan of the latter model.
https://www.renehersecycles.com/prod...tires/26-inch/
Is Jan Hiend from Bicycle Quaterly involved with these tires? He always does his homework, I will take a better look at these
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Old 08-15-19, 04:13 PM
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For the puncture sealing, you can get the same from putting tubeless sealant in your tubes.
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Old 08-15-19, 04:16 PM
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Originally Posted by chrisx View Post
https://www.renehersecycles.com/prod...tires/26-inch/
Is Jan Hiend from Bicycle Quaterly involved with these tires? He always does his homework, I will take a better look at these
Yes, indeed. JH has even said that he wouldn't mind doing PBP on the Rat Trap Pass tires!
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Old 08-15-19, 04:57 PM
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Originally Posted by Darth Lefty View Post
For the puncture sealing, you can get the same from putting tubeless sealant in your tubes.
Not so.
In a tire stans or orange seal fills the hole, for good, you keep rolling.
In a tube, orange seal or stans, slows the leak, so you can go home and patch the tube.

Not a guess, been there tried that.

Originally Posted by ThermionicScott View Post
Yes, indeed. JH has even said that he wouldn't mind doing PBP on the Rat Trap Pass tires!
He always does his homework, if Mr Hiend says they are good tires, they might just work. He tries to ride much faster than >I do though.
Long time since I spoke to him. The lads from the Bikery gave him a 1933 basket case, he restored it, think that had something to do with the parts store, he had to make parts.

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Old 08-17-19, 10:00 PM
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Just want to bump the thread, maybe someone who has not seen it yet, has another good ideaŅ

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Old 08-18-19, 04:19 AM
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Originally Posted by chrisx View Post
Not so.
In a tire stans or orange seal fills the hole, for good, you keep rolling.
In a tube, orange seal or stans, slows the leak, so you can go home and patch the tube.

Not a guess, been there tried that.
Yep. Works great in tubeless setup. Not the same at all in tubes. In my experience with tubes it wasn't even worth the mess or trouble. With a tubeless setup it was great.

To the OP:
I have a pair of never used Stans Ravens in 26x2.0" that I will probably never get around to using. Not designed for on the road, but lots of nice low knobs so they roll well. I wasn't really looking to sell them, but if you are interested PM me. Did they stop making them? I don't see them on their page now.

Other tubeless 26" tires designed for cross country racing and riding have a low knob pattern with lots of small knobs that roll decent on pavement and work great on dirt roads so other tires designed for that usage may work out okay. The two things you may find lacking are that they may not be as long wearing and the sidewall may be less robust than you may like.

Personally I am willing to take my chances with the sidewalls for the nice ride feel of a supple casing. I have always had good luck with preserving the integrity of my sidewalls though. In remote third world settings that may mean carrying a spare.
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Old 08-18-19, 04:47 AM
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Personally I'd just run a non-tubeless tire if it's a tire you want, and from a quality tire manufacturer. I assume you won't be running these at high pressures. That's how people started out with tubeless and mountain biking. If they can run them on serious mountain bikes without having problems, years ago(tires have gotten better), I doubt you'll have anything to worry about.

For what it's worth, I did a gravel tour of the peninsula in Costa Rica about a year and a half ago on non-tubeless designated Vittoria Peyote in 650b. They were mounted on Stans rims with Gorilla tape rim strips and vavles cut out of old, flat tubes. I put one small bottle of sealant per tire. They had zero problems and zero flats. They actually had zero flats or problems after I got home and I rode them until the rear was basically bald.

I'd actually recommend the Peyote or Mezcal for the sort of trip you're doing, except that the Peyote might not last as long as you'd like depending on how long the tour is and how much road. The Mezcal might last longer since it has a center ridge, and might roll a little better on the road too? The Peyote has low knobs and is designed for rolling fast. I was impressed with the road performance given that it was a knobby tire. I only got a couple thousand miles out of it, though. I'm not upset considering at least half of those were on road(probably more like 1,600) and it's not a road tire.

A suggestion for cantilever brakes? The solution most companies changed to long ago. V-brakes.
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Old 08-18-19, 05:07 AM
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Or don't reinvent the wheel, 26 x 2 Marathon Mondials with tubes and a bit of Slime, if you can't get them to seal tubeless. I've run them down to 16-18psi on gravel with tubes, 90kg me and 45kg of bike and gear, for climbing steep hills, 25-30 is a better general pressure. If you are going to try tubeless use something like Joes Or Stans rubber strips with the built in valve in the widest you can get. Wide enough to lap up the sides of the rim a bit so the bead seats against them. Use a small amount of latex sealant first to seal the casing of the tire, then give it a full dose of your favourite sealant.
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Old 08-18-19, 05:52 AM
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Originally Posted by Trevtassie View Post
Or don't reinvent the wheel, 26 x 2 Marathon Mondials with tubes and a bit of Slime.
At ~2lbs each, plus slime, and thick, stiff sidewalls? May as well just go back to solid rubber tires again! Iím glad someone reinvented the wheel!

I kid, of course. I know these work for some people. I just canít imagine how that must ride with probably 3.5lbs of stiff rubber/tube/slime wrapped around each wheel. 7lbs of tire set-up? Eek!

Go tubeless!

Last edited by 3speed; 08-18-19 at 06:05 AM.
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Old 08-18-19, 06:53 AM
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Originally Posted by 3speed View Post
At ~2lbs each, plus slime, and thick, stiff sidewalls? May as well just go back to solid rubber tires again! Iím glad someone reinvented the wheel!

I kid, of course. I know these work for some people. I just canít imagine how that must ride with probably 3.5lbs of stiff rubber/tube/slime wrapped around each wheel. 7lbs of tire set-up? Eek!

Go tubeless!
There probably are settings where a setup that stiff and heavy makes sense, but yeah I shudder to think about it. For me it is as much the super stiff noncompliant ride of a super stiff sidewall with a heavy tire and tube, but also the weight. Industrial settings and really extreme commuting settings come to mind, but I for one would never tour on something like that again.

I love a lively compliant sidewall and light wheels and tires, at least to the extent possible for the conditions. They make riding a joy.

If someone else can find joy on a super stiff tire and heavy wheels and tires more power to them, but it would suck too much of the joy out of riding for me. I tried going that stiff heavy route once (Marathon Plus 700x32) and hated it. I took them off and sold them.
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Old 08-18-19, 11:58 AM
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[quote=chrisx;21076140]I did not know how hard it is to find them.

Originally Posted by 3speed View Post
Personally I'd just run a non-tubeless tire



I'd actually recommend the Peyote or Mezcal





changed to long ago. V-brakes.
SIZEWIDTHETRTOTIRE BUILDCASINGMATERIALCOLORWEIGHTART. COD.

27.52.152-584Rigid beadXCNylon 26 TPIBlack770g111.3RR.23.52.111TG

27.52.152-584Tubeless Ready (TNT)XC TrailNylon 120 TPIAnthracite690g11A.00.056

27.52.2555-584Rigid beadXCNylon 26 TPIBlack780g111.3RR.23.55.111TG

27.52.2555-584Tubeless Ready (TNT)XC TrailNylon 120 TPIAnthracite730g11A.00.058

27.52.3557-584Tubeless Ready (TNT)XC TrailNylon 120 TPIAnthracite730g11A.00.059

292.152-622Rigid beadXCNylon 26 TPIBlack810g111.3RO.23.52.111TG

292.152-622Tubeless Ready (TNT)XC TrailNylon 120 TPIAnthracite715g11A.00.060

292.2555-622Rigid beadXCNylon 26 TPIBlack880g111.3RO.23.55.111TG

292.2555-622TLRXC RaceNylon 120 TPIPara670g11A.00.061

292.2555-622Tubeless Ready (TNT)XC TrailNylon 120 TPIAnthracite710g11A.00.062

292.3557-622Tubeless Ready (TNT)XC TrailNylon 120 TPIAnthracite750g11A.00.063

Most pages look like this
no 26 listed here.
I might look more closely at these when I need tires for the Fargo, thanks.

Did you cross any mud with thoose low nobs?
I like those low nob tires in the desert, until it rains one day.


Wheels and tires could be the eaisest place to make your bike a couple of pounds lighter.
Tubeless works !

Originally Posted by 3speed View Post
At ~2lbs each, plus slime, and thick, stiff sidewalls? May as well just go back to solid rubber tires again! I’m glad someone reinvented the wheel!

I kid, of course. I know these work for some people. I just can’t imagine how that must ride with probably 3.5lbs of stiff rubber/tube/slime wrapped around each wheel. 7lbs of tire set-up? Eek!

Go tubeless!


Last edited by chrisx; 08-18-19 at 12:08 PM.
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Old 08-18-19, 03:56 PM
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Originally Posted by staehpj1 View Post
There probably are settings where a setup that stiff and heavy makes sense, but yeah I shudder to think about it. For me it is as much the super stiff noncompliant ride of a super stiff sidewall with a heavy tire and tube, but also the weight. Industrial settings and really extreme commuting settings come to mind, but I for one would never tour on something like that again.

I love a lively compliant sidewall and light wheels and tires, at least to the extent possible for the conditions. They make riding a joy.

If someone else can find joy on a super stiff tire and heavy wheels and tires more power to them, but it would suck too much of the joy out of riding for me. I tried going that stiff heavy route once (Marathon Plus 700x32) and hated it. I took them off and sold them.
Ummmm, you mean like remote areas in South America, where a ripped up tire is a show stopper, until you can organise a decent new one? I get the impression the OP isn't going to be credit card touring. There's nothing lively about a bike loaded for remote touring, it's gonna be as heavy as hell anyway, food, fuel, maybe extra water. Even touring in Europe, if you are camping you end up with a reasonable load.

There currently is only one officially tubeless touring tire in a size that will fit the OPs bike, the Surly Extra Terrestrial in 26" x 46mm. I can't recommend them because I haven't used them, only the 2.5" version, which I ran tubeless, and they suck because the mileage you get isn't very good heavily loaded. The 46 may be different as the tread pattern is much closer, and even then they are going to come in around 800g or so anyway.
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Old 08-19-19, 06:43 AM
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Originally Posted by Trevtassie View Post
Ummmm, you mean like remote areas in South America, where a ripped up tire is a show stopper, until you can organise a decent new one? I get the impression the OP isn't going to be credit card touring. There's nothing lively about a bike loaded for remote touring, it's gonna be as heavy as hell anyway, food, fuel, maybe extra water. Even touring in Europe, if you are camping you end up with a reasonable load.

There currently is only one officially tubeless touring tire in a size that will fit the OPs bike, the Surly Extra Terrestrial in 26" x 46mm. I can't recommend them because I haven't used them, only the 2.5" version, which I ran tubeless, and they suck because the mileage you get isn't very good heavily loaded. The 46 may be different as the tread pattern is much closer, and even then they are going to come in around 800g or so anyway.
Yep, that is a reason/place where it may make sense and where heavy stiff tires are the most common approach. My thought has been that before I'd consider carrying tires twice as heavy I'd consider carrying a spare or even two spares if I was that worried. I am not saying that I'd necessarily do that, but that I'd consider it before going to the extreme of double the weight in tires. It is probably moot because old age seems to be creeping up on me faster than I seem to be tackling items on my bucket list these days and touring in South America probably won't happen for me with a lot of other things on the list ahead of it. Also the thing is I have gotten to the point that I just don't want to ride a bike with 50# of stuff on it or carry a backpack with more than a UL base, few days of food/fuel, and a water filter. I can see myself doing another few multi thousand mile tours camping and cooking, but they will be with a base weight of well under 20#. The same for backpacking,. I'll probably do more moderate length backpacking trips, but there will be water to filter and food resupply points every few days. I am getting too old to be a pack mule even though I am not yet 70.

I have only toured in the US, so maybe this is naive, but I'd still suggest that just maybe it isn't impossible to travel relatively light regardless of where you go in reasonably temperate or hot climates until the distances between food and water resupply get too great. As you say food and fuel can be heavy and can be the limiting factor in whether fairly light travel is possible. I have generally not found it too hard to backpack with a base gear weight of 10-14# of camping and cooking gear. Add 2-3# of food and fuel per day depending on how carefully you pack and what foods are available at restock points. Water isn't too big of a problem when surface water is available to filter/treat, otherwise it can be a pretty big deal.

I have generally found that applying those same methods used in backpacking worked fine for touring and that most typically restock points have been much more frequent except when I went off road touring. I was packed fairly heavy by my current standards for a trip across the Southern Tier with 14# base weight. Since then I managed to pick some nicer gear that allowed a bit more comfort and protection from the elements without additional weight and even with a possibility of trimming a bit depending on specific choices for a given trip.

So all of that leaves me with a question that may shoot a huge hole in my possibly very naive preconceived notions. How far between resupply points do folks touring in South America typically need to go when on a trip like the folks I tend to run into who are riding from Alaska to the tip of Argentina?
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