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Show Me Your Kickstand? Or Is That Too Personal?

Old 04-09-20, 02:15 PM
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The only confusing part would be the mount, I suppose. Here is a photo from Amazon, showing it mounts with quite a tall stack. I just don't know that I want to add almost 3 pounds with this thing. That is excessively heavy in my opinion.

https://www.amazon.com/Ursus-Jumbo-D.../dp/B00D1T90XK




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Old 04-09-20, 03:18 PM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by UKFan4Sure
All is takes is one slight breeze to blow a bike leaning on something, and down it goes.
I don't get that statement. Maybe it is just me, but I always figured that a bike is more likely to blow over when on a little stand than when leaning against a nice solid wall, guard rail, or whatever. I figure that is doubly true when the stand is on dirt. My buddies tell me their bikes never blow over when on their stands, but I know better because I have seen it happen the times they seem to have forgotten about. I think maybe the key is to not rely on the stand when in the open and the wind is really blowing.

I figure that if a stand works for you and you find it worth the weight you should have one. I also agree that the two legged stand is nice as a work stand.
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Old 04-09-20, 03:44 PM
  #28  
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The original stand which came with this bike was rubbish. So I had this made up. I would have liked to make a good solid kickstand out of aluminum, but I used what was available.


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Old 04-09-20, 04:22 PM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by UKFan4Sure
I think this nails it. For me, the extra pound or so just won't matter considering the value of being able to flop down a stand and hold my bike up. All is takes is one slight breeze to blow a bike leaning on something, and down it goes. Laying my bike down either gets all of my bags dirty or scuffed. And being able to access stuff in my rear bags without having to manage the upright position of the bike at the same time is what turns the tide for me. I still believe I'll order the double stand. I totally understand the weight savings of not having one, but I really like that convenience and will pay the price. I can afford to lose a few pounds anywho....
I agree with staehpj1. Look at the pictures I posted in post 4 above. The bikes that are being held up with a biomass derived kickstand...i.e. a “stick”...take very little to fall over. Those are the closest to a regular kickstand. I used the stick for the picture but, seriously, I wouldn’t trust it to hold the bike up for more than a few seconds. The bike that is leaned up against the guardrail in New Jersey would take a 200 mph wind to blow over. Same with the wall, tree or cactus. The bike held up by a post would take a light breeze...about 60 mph...to blow over. The bike being held up over the chasm is even less stable than the stick “kickstand” (the 2x4 did have a cable running through it). A kickstand on a bike wouldn’t be any more stable in that situation. This bike wouldn’t fall over until the wall falls over

Untitled by Stuart Black, on Flickr

Nor would this one

Untitled by Stuart Black, on Flickr

Nor this one

Rollins Pass, 8/10/85 by Stuart Black, on Flickr

And this HelMart in upstate New York would have to fall down before my bike would fall over

2015-05-03 11.38.54 by Stuart Black, on Flickr

I’ve had plenty bike fall over when I was using a kickstand many eons ago and I’ve witnessed many bikes falling over since. I don’t use them now because I got out of the habit and found I didn’t need them. Use them if you want but most people find that they don’t need them.

Originally Posted by UKFan4Sure
Intersting. Looks extremely sturdy according to this video:
The video shows a number of the problems I see with kickstands. The legs on that one seem to hang further down than the one sided ones. The mount is also extremely low. It seems low enough to catch on a curb or sharper speed bump. It also hangs low enough that it would catch on sticks, logs and rocks for off-road riding...which is the main reason I don’t use them.

Finally, the video illustrates why stands of don’t necessarily make working on a bike any easier. At 0:27, he spins the crank and it hits the stand. You couldn’t spin the crank all the way around while it is up on the stand nor could you spin the crank all the way around with a single side stand.
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Old 04-09-20, 05:14 PM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by cyccommute

The video shows a number of the problems I see with kickstands. The legs on that one seem to hang further down than the one sided ones. The mount is also extremely low. It seems low enough to catch on a curb or sharper speed bump. It also hangs low enough that it would catch on sticks, logs and rocks for off-road riding...which is the main reason I don’t use them.

Finally, the video illustrates why stands of don’t necessarily make working on a bike any easier. At 0:27, he spins the crank and it hits the stand. You couldn’t spin the crank all the way around while it is up on the stand nor could you spin the crank all the way around with a single side stand.
I'm trying to see your point of view, but if I'm willing to tote the extra weight, where's the harm? You have to admit, putting that double-legged stand up, firmly planted to the ground widely in two places, allows you to open your panniers and get to stuff a whole lot easier. While you're rummaging around in your rucks, you're not balancing the bike to boot. As far as spinning the crank, at least you can rotate it 180 degrees before meeting the leg as an obstruction. If I had no stand, how am I going to even examine a problem? How am I going to get the rear wheel off the ground? I can't spin the wheel at all because there is no way to prop it up to spin it. I'm not sure I'd be hopping many curbs, but I see your point, there. It is awfully low. I'm not likely to be going very far off road with the bike I have. The bike is strictly for road use. I've already eliminated this type of stand in the video because it's 2.8 pounds. That's way too heavy. I'm thinking about a different one that is lighter. Thanks for the reply as these are the types of things I need to consider before I invest in one.
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Old 04-09-20, 05:36 PM
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Originally Posted by UKFan4Sure
The only confusing part would be the mount, I suppose. Here is a photo from Amazon, showing it mounts with quite a tall stack. ...
It has to hang down that far so the right side leg will not interfere with the chain. Some of them have a bent leg instead like the Pletsher.

When I was a kid i had a paper route and a bike with really big rear baskets. And I had a kickstand like that but mine was made out of stamped sheet steel. And it hung down that far so that the leg on the right side cleared the chain.
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Old 04-09-20, 05:42 PM
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I'm looking at this one. I read the Q and A section and it says the cranks can be rotated while the legs are down. One person even said they even sat on the bike while the stand was down. I would never do that due to the possibility of crushing the chain stays, but it was an interesting testament to it's weight capacity.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...k_ql_qh_dp_hza
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Old 04-09-20, 05:45 PM
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Originally Posted by staehpj1
I don't get that statement. Maybe it is just me, but I always figured that a bike is more likely to blow over when on a little stand than when leaning against a nice solid wall, guard rail, or whatever. I figure that is doubly true when the stand is on dirt. My buddies tell me their bikes never blow over when on their stands, but I know better because I have seen it happen the times they seem to have forgotten about. I think maybe the key is to not rely on the stand when in the open and the wind is really blowing.

I figure that if a stand works for you and you find it worth the weight you should have one. I also agree that the two legged stand is nice as a work stand.
I guess I was stating my experience, but I've never locked the front brake as others have "clue-fully" pointed out should be done. I would assume my problem was the wind causing the bars to rotate and then the wheel to roll.
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Old 04-10-20, 06:19 AM
  #34  
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I mentioned above that when I was a kid I had a double leg center stand for my paper route bike. That bike I often had very heavy rear load. But I never had anything on the front of the bike, so the front wheel easily was suspended up in the air when i had the rear baskets loaded. Most of the weight was on the rear wheel, a small amount of weight was on the center stand.

If most of the weight is on the front wheel or rear wheel but not both, then a center stand does not have much load on it. But a balanced load on the bike if you had both front and rear panniers would have a center of gravity closer to where the kickstand is mounted, thus most of the weight could be on the frame at the kickstand mounting point. I would be nervous about applying that kind of stress to a frame that was not designed for it.

I know people have used double leg center stands and I have not read of any frame failures, so maybe the frames can take it. But I would still be nervous about that.

I had to use some muscle to get my motorcycle up onto the center stand, but that frame was designed with the center stand in mind.

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Old 04-10-20, 07:58 AM
  #35  
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Nice bike!
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Old 04-10-20, 08:36 AM
  #36  
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Nice bike indeed, but lets be honest, he took this photo mere seconds after putting it up on the stand--how do I know? There aren't any oil drops on the pavement yet (smiley winky face thingee)

I could google it, but wont--given the front drum, my guess is 1970?
I look at that bike, and it really makes me think of how when I started riding motorcycles, it was on bikes from this era, and how with each decade, bikes became just so much composed and improved chassis, suspension and brakes wise--just amazingly so, and very neat to clearly recall how the 70s and 80s bikes I rode felt in these regards.

fun to put this shot up though, thanks
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Old 04-10-20, 05:54 PM
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Originally Posted by djb
Nice bike indeed, but lets be honest, he took this photo mere seconds after putting it up on the stand--how do I know? There aren't any oil drops on the pavement yet (smiley winky face thingee)

I could google it, but wont--given the front drum, my guess is 1970?
I look at that bike, and it really makes me think of how when I started riding motorcycles, it was on bikes from this era, and how with each decade, bikes became just so much composed and improved chassis, suspension and brakes wise--just amazingly so, and very neat to clearly recall how the 70s and 80s bikes I rode felt in these regards.

fun to put this shot up though, thanks
74 T100R Daytona. If it stopped leaking oil, you started to worry.
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Old 04-10-20, 06:15 PM
  #38  
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Originally Posted by UKFan4Sure
I'm looking at this one. I read the Q and A section and it says the cranks can be rotated while the legs are down. One person even said they even sat on the bike while the stand was down. I would never do that due to the possibility of crushing the chain stays, but it was an interesting testament to it's weight capacity.
In S E Asia people often sit on motorbikes while the stand is down. When they see my big bike, people often get on it, and sit on it. The stand holds up to their weight. Many people also like to ride it. They all tell me it is easier to ride, or has less rolling resistance, than a regular bike. They are normally comparing it with Japanese ladies bikes.

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Old 04-10-20, 08:28 PM
  #39  
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Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN
74 T100R Daytona. If it stopped leaking oil, you started to worry.
old photo or do you still own and ride it?
curious about how that front drum feels/ felt--- grabby, fadey? Haven't ridden a front drum bike for who knows how long.
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Old 04-11-20, 07:37 AM
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Originally Posted by djb
old photo or do you still own and ride it?
curious about how that front drum feels/ felt--- grabby, fadey? Haven't ridden a front drum bike for who knows how long.
Old photo, have not driven it in years but still own it. And a few others.

Photo from the other side below, the newer style drum worked better being a twin leading shoe than the older standard drum brake that was single leading shoe. Even though there was a scoop for air flow so rain water could get in to the brake pads, the brakes worked just as well in rain as dry. The brakes always stopped me, thus I could never figure out why people wanted disc brakes.



Sorry for being off topic, in an attempt to get back on topic this photo has the side stand in use.
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Old 04-11-20, 09:39 AM
  #41  
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tks T, probably good to remove plugs and turn over by hand once in a blue moon after putting some heavy weight oil in the cylinders---but I'll now shut up about motorcycles--except for this, even with motorcycles, kickstands can sink into hot, soft asphalt and you can come out and your motorcycle is on the ground.

so even with bicycles, and more so with a loaded one, you have to watch where you put the foot of the stand.
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Old 04-11-20, 09:56 AM
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Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN
Old photo, have not driven it in years but still own it. And a few others.

Photo from the other side below, the newer style drum worked better being a twin leading shoe than the older standard drum brake that was single leading shoe. Even though there was a scoop for air flow so rain water could get in to the brake pads, the brakes worked just as well in rain as dry. The brakes always stopped me, thus I could never figure out why people wanted disc brakes.



Sorry for being off topic, in an attempt to get back on topic this photo has the side stand in use.
Love the old Triumphs. My friend had a Thunderbird I often borrowed a couple of summers ago. Loved it!
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Old 04-11-20, 04:40 PM
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I got the stand today and installed it. It weighs in at 589g, so about 1.3 pounds. The drive side clears the crank, but the non-drive side doesn't, I can get about 340 degrees of rotation when turning the crank. The feet are adjustable, but I left them in the default lowest position. With weight in the rear, one pic shows how high the front wheel is off the ground. Excuse the grease you see on at the bottom bracket. I had serviced the bearings just a short time ago and need to wipe off the excess.

Take a look:







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Old 10-27-23, 01:53 PM
  #44  
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I figure this is the closest we have to a kickstand appreciation thread so I'm putting this here, seen in ad for a Hercules. Nice top!

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Old 10-28-23, 11:56 AM
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I'm much more in the kicked the stand group than the kickstand group.
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Old 10-28-23, 12:06 PM
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I have nothing to add to what I said three and a half years ago in this thread.
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Old 10-28-23, 12:56 PM
  #47  
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I had the two-leg Pletscher kickstand seen above at post #43 on my Bassi Hog's Back gravel bike.

It lasted until about hour three on the road on the first tour on that bike.

It worked itself a little loose, and then looser still, to where i had to stop and do something about it. I had my regular tools that i have carried for many years, with no wrench that fit the enormous bolt that holds the thing on. I thus could not tighten it enough to make it safe/secure, and ended up removing it entirely, because that i could do. Also that wrench would have to have been some kind of unusually-configured socket, because of poor clearance around the bolt making it very hard to get at.

The kickstand ended up getting mailed home from the first post office i saw. It was great while it lasted- just make sure you have a wrench that will re-tighten it, or else have $ for postage home.
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Old 10-28-23, 08:59 PM
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Originally Posted by ignant666
It [Pletscher 2-legged] was great while it lasted- just make sure you have a wrench that will re-tighten it, or else have $ for postage home.
Also make sure the bolt goes more that half way into the threaded part of the hole if you're going to use it with a loaded bike. I used the stand, and enjoyed it, with my overloaded bike until the stand fell off from the aluminum threads being stripped out. The stand never showed any sign of being loose.

I was able to put the stand back in service by getting a longer bolt to reach the lower half of the threaded hole, but I'll be using something else for future touring.

Maybe this from a telescoping tarp pole and some rope ( a lot lighter than the stand ) :

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Old 11-01-23, 07:18 AM
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Did I miss it? I haven’t seen anyone mention the Click-Stand. Allied with a SteerStopper, the Click-Stand works great. It makes loading panniers very convenient.

The SteerStopper and the Click-Stand brake lever bungee make leaning your bicycle against almost anything solid, secure, and easy. You can lean either tire, the handlebar, the seat, almost any part of the bicycle or pannier against a wall, fence, pole, tree, whatever and it is secure.
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Old 11-14-23, 04:36 PM
  #50  
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Anything can work



Never could catch anything with this piece of junk!
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