Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Touring
Reload this Page >

Hammock or tent? Other essential gear for touring

Notices
Touring Have a dream to ride a bike across your state, across the country, or around the world? Self-contained or fully supported? Trade ideas, adventures, and more in our bicycle touring forum.

Hammock or tent? Other essential gear for touring

Old 05-26-20, 11:49 AM
  #51  
mev
bicycle tourist
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Austin, Texas, USA
Posts: 1,877

Bikes: Trek 520, Lightfoot Ranger, Trek 4500

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 282 Post(s)
Liked 73 Times in 59 Posts
Originally Posted by phughes View Post
I just set up the REI Passage-1 in the back yard. The setup is easy and fast, and the tent is roomy for a one person tent. There is a small vestibule in front of the entrance suitable for your shoes and a little gear. Overall, not bad for a one person tent. I think I would like the two person version for the extra room, but it doesn't seem worth the extra weight or size, even though the extra weight and size is minimal. I have room on either side of me, and at each end. It seems as if I could actually bring at least one pannier inside comfortably, though I rarely do that anyway.

The rain fly has an opening you can open, complete with a rod sewn into the fly which is covered in velcro, that allows you to prop it open for ventilation. It also has a pocket on the inside of the tent for your phone and other items. Not bad, especially for the price. $95.99 and free shipping. The two person model, the Passage-2 is on sale for $109.99.
Thanks for sharing the review and photo.

At least as much as the one vs. two - what seems nice on this tent is the overall height. I finally got rid of my last tent with a low enough ceiling that I couldn't sit up. That is a somewhat larger issue than the overall width. It looks like the width of the 1-person (36 inches) vs 2-person (52 inches) makes this a one-person on the roomy side and a two-person on the narrow side.

I got my experience with both size tents on an extended trip across Russia. Through my own fault, I hadn't set up my tent before my trip and was surprised to find myself with a one-person (MSR Hubba) when I thought I had ordered a two-person (MSR Hubba Hubba). On that trip, I spent a lot of time in the tent in intense Siberian mosquito/bug zones and I was grateful to be able to sit in my tent. Even that one-person model had two doors and vestibules on both sides so I was able to place some panniers in the vestibules. Part way though the trip, my brother visited and brought with him a two-person Hubba Hubba tent. After he left, I did the remainder of the trip with a two-person tent.

Overall, I have a slight preference for a two-person tent, but it isn't as big as my preference to make sure the center height is tall enough.

Although when I go with my minimal tube-tent I also can't sit in it (and it doesn't have doors to keep out bugs) but that is more of a provisional situation when most of my nights are in motels and just a few in the tube tent.
mev is offline  
Likes For mev:
Old 05-26-20, 02:24 PM
  #52  
bark_eater 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Eastern Shore, MD
Posts: 1,342

Bikes: Road ready: 1993 Koga Miyata City Liner Touring Hybrid, 1989 Centurion Sport DLX, "I Blame GP" Bridgestone CB-1. Projects: Yea, I got a problem....

Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 450 Post(s)
Liked 193 Times in 143 Posts
Ive back packed with a hennesy hammock since they fist came out. I have a Blackbird now but have only used it few times. I took a tent last year because I wasnt 100% that every campsite would be hangable. If I was stealth camping around maine I would definatly take a hammock.
that's an excellent engineering solution for the missing tree. Myself I like to be able to set up camp well after the reptilian mind has taken over.

Last edited by bark_eater; 05-26-20 at 02:27 PM.
bark_eater is offline  
Likes For bark_eater:
Old 05-26-20, 03:36 PM
  #53  
Tourist in MSN
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 8,180

Bikes: 1961 Ideor, 1994 Bridgestone MB-6, 2006 Airnimal Joey, 2009 Thorn Sherpa, 2013 Thorn Nomad MkII, 2015 VO Pass Hunter, 2017 Lynskey Backroad, 2017 Raleigh Gran Prix, Perfekt 3 Speed -age unknown, 1980s Bianchi Mixte on a trainer. Others are now gone.

Mentioned: 37 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2240 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 512 Times in 420 Posts
On the two versus one person tent, I agree with the consensus, prefer two person when I am traveling solo. I have used several different two person tents for bike touring, usually there is enough room for me to lie down in the middle, on one side I have two panniers and on the other side have two panniers plus handlebar bag.

I like to be able to pack up my gear while I am in the tent in the event it is raining in the morning, then the last thing that needs to be packed is the tent. My tent is always packed in the front right pannier and other stuff in that pannier is stuff that I do not care if it gets damp from any moisture on the tent. This way, when it is raining while I pack up in the morning, I can get three panniers packed inside the tent where it is dry. As Mev noted, you want to be able to sit up in the tent, if it is that tall then it is easier to get stuff into and out of your panniers inside the tent.

In post number 10, above, there are two photos of my tent that I prefer for bike touring, that is a two person tent, it also has a vestibule that offers some more storage space in the doorway area.

I have done some trips with a one person tent, one of those was so small I could not get more than one pannier inside the tent with me and could not get the other three in the tiny vestibule where the door was.

A two person tent is heavier than a one person tent, but not by much, carrying a few more ounces and spending a few more dollars is worth it.
Tourist in MSN is offline  
Likes For Tourist in MSN:
Old 05-26-20, 06:28 PM
  #54  
fourfa
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 179
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 75 Post(s)
Liked 38 Times in 27 Posts
ctrl-F 'bivy sack' not found...

They're not for everyone. (Neither is a hammock.) But it's hard to argue with a complete waterproof and comfortable* shelter for 16oz that packs down to the size of a can of soup. Personally I'm a fan; I pray for group backpacking trips to have an odd number of people so I can bivy rather than have to carry half of someone else's tent. Done two complete solo tours in one (~5 months worth), very happily. I couldn't spot a definitive answer from the original poster, but it seems they are talking about a solo trip, so bivy should be one of the options under consideration.

* not for claustrophobes. And best not for rainy-season trips (though I'd rather avoid that altogether), nor winter trips where you might need to zip in for 12+ hours.

If it's not a solo trip... I also have a 4-lb "3 person tent" that's really a roomy 2-person tent, and it's been terrific bikepacking with the girlfriend. Room enough to get all the panniers inside and still have room to change etc. Tents have come a long way in recent years. In 2020 I personally wouldn't look at anything that's over 4 lbs. Hub-and-spoke pole design, lightweight fabrics, minimal pockets and zippers and other cruft. You can also get under 2lbs with a TarpTent style design - waterproof singlewall but so roomy and breezy that the usual problems with condensation don't happen.

Last edited by fourfa; 05-26-20 at 06:49 PM.
fourfa is offline  
Old 05-26-20, 07:22 PM
  #55  
mev
bicycle tourist
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Austin, Texas, USA
Posts: 1,877

Bikes: Trek 520, Lightfoot Ranger, Trek 4500

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 282 Post(s)
Liked 73 Times in 59 Posts
Originally Posted by fourfa View Post
ctrl-F 'bivy sack' not found...

They're not for everyone. (Neither is a hammock.) But it's hard to argue with a complete waterproof and comfortable* shelter for 16oz that packs down to the size of a can of soup. Personally I'm a fan; I pray for group backpacking trips to have an odd number of people so I can bivy rather than have to carry half of someone else's tent. Done two complete solo tours in one (~5 months worth), very happily. I couldn't spot a definitive answer from the original poster, but it seems they are talking about a solo trip, so bivy should be one of the options under consideration.
After having tried a bivy sack is why I went back to a tube tent like this one: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00FB7XYRS/
I can unzip it into a tarp, or put a string through it and pitch it like the following photo. The drawback vs. a bivy is no good bug protection. The advantage is slightly more room/versatility as well as being less expensive.

If I am going on a trip where I camp a considerable amount of time, I'll bring a real tent. If I go on a trip I expect to motel most of the time, but want some flexibility if the motels are full/unavailable (e.g. photo above), then I'll pack my tube tent.
mev is offline  
Likes For mev:
Old 05-26-20, 09:12 PM
  #56  
DropBarFan
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 3,150

Bikes: 2013 Surly Disc Trucker, 2004 Novara Randonee , old fixie , etc

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 671 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 48 Times in 42 Posts
I would go with a tent, adds some weight but IMHO more versatile than a hammock. For a shorter tour it might be cheaper & more convenient to get food from restaurants/grocery stores than toting food & cooking. For rainy Nova Scotia one would want appropriate clothing of course.
DropBarFan is offline  
Old 05-31-20, 09:54 AM
  #57  
bark_eater 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Eastern Shore, MD
Posts: 1,342

Bikes: Road ready: 1993 Koga Miyata City Liner Touring Hybrid, 1989 Centurion Sport DLX, "I Blame GP" Bridgestone CB-1. Projects: Yea, I got a problem....

Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 450 Post(s)
Liked 193 Times in 143 Posts
Originally Posted by mev View Post
After having tried a bivy sack is why I went back to a tube tent like this one: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00FB7XYRS/
I can unzip it into a tarp, or put a string through it and pitch it like the following photo. The drawback vs. a bivy is no good bug protection. The advantage is slightly more room/versatility as well as being less expensive.

If I am going on a trip where I camp a considerable amount of time, I'll bring a real tent. If I go on a trip I expect to motel most of the time, but want some flexibility if the motels are full/unavailable (e.g. photo above), then I'll pack my tube tent.
I was a committed tarp camper, and the primary reason I am carrying a tent is for camping in state campgrounds.

For flying bug protection I used to use small mesh dome tent that went over my head. That was only efective when it was cool enough to stay in a sleeping bag and in tick free areas. You could fit one of those in your tube tent or they are available without poles that hang from your Ridge line.

I have spent hundreds of nights under a kelty Noahs tarp pitched upside down. It has a bunch of additional tie out points that I hung a cheap army cot sized mosquito cover from. Cheap,light and capable of q bomb proof pitch.
bark_eater is offline  
Old 05-31-20, 10:30 AM
  #58  
Fissile
Senior Member
 
Fissile's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 611
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 32 Post(s)
Liked 14 Times in 13 Posts
I have a Hennessy Hammock. These are pictures of a test set-up from several years ago. I can get the hammock and sleeping bag, into a single pannier with a bit of room to spare. Be advised, a hammock is really a warm weather option. Cooler weather will require an under-quilt or you'll freeze.



Fissile is offline  
Old 05-31-20, 10:59 AM
  #59  
bark_eater 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Eastern Shore, MD
Posts: 1,342

Bikes: Road ready: 1993 Koga Miyata City Liner Touring Hybrid, 1989 Centurion Sport DLX, "I Blame GP" Bridgestone CB-1. Projects: Yea, I got a problem....

Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 450 Post(s)
Liked 193 Times in 143 Posts
I used a first generation Hennesy for a long time. Mosquitos could bite through the bottom so I needed to atleast sleep with a fleece sleeping bag or "pajamas", so it wasn't that great for true jungle nights. The blackbird I replaced it with has a double bottom, but I miss the bottom exit / entrance of the hennesy.
bark_eater is offline  
Old 05-31-20, 11:03 AM
  #60  
Fissile
Senior Member
 
Fissile's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 611
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 32 Post(s)
Liked 14 Times in 13 Posts
Originally Posted by bark_eater View Post
I used a first generation Hennesy for a long time. Mosquitos could bite through the bottom so I needed to atleast sleep with a fleece sleeping bag or "pajamas", so it wasn't that great for true jungle nights. The blackbird I replaced it with has a double bottom, but I miss the bottom exit / entrance of the hennesy.
This is true. I never used the Hennessy without a sleeping bag. If it was warm, I'd sleep on top of the bag.
Fissile is offline  
Likes For Fissile:
Old 05-31-20, 02:11 PM
  #61  
Tourist in MSN
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 8,180

Bikes: 1961 Ideor, 1994 Bridgestone MB-6, 2006 Airnimal Joey, 2009 Thorn Sherpa, 2013 Thorn Nomad MkII, 2015 VO Pass Hunter, 2017 Lynskey Backroad, 2017 Raleigh Gran Prix, Perfekt 3 Speed -age unknown, 1980s Bianchi Mixte on a trainer. Others are now gone.

Mentioned: 37 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2240 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 512 Times in 420 Posts
My tour last summer in Canadian Maritimes, sometimes in the morning looking out through the mosquito netting in the door I could see the mosquitoes were waiting for breakfast.

Tourist in MSN is offline  
Likes For Tourist in MSN:
Old 06-01-20, 10:02 AM
  #62  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 23,989

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, an orange one and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 121 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4102 Post(s)
Liked 1,592 Times in 974 Posts
Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy View Post

Not to start a big fuss or anything, but I've been doing long distance backpacks with my wife in the North Cascades for about 40 years. We have almost always brought our food into the tent with us. We tried hanging it a few times, but every time we did that, some of the food got eaten and more got crapped on, which is not a good thing on a long distance unsupported backpack. Critters know two things: hanging stuff is food and easily accessible and tents contain humans, who are dangerous. We've often gotten up in the morning in an area with other campers and observed their shredded hanging stuff. Of course the even larger problem is that there's seldom anywhere to hang anything more than 4' off the ground. How do you think that works.
If your food gets eaten or crapped on, you are hanging it improperly. It needs to be high and away from the trunk of the tree. And itís not like the food is out of some container. I hang the bike bag or backpack that the food is in. If an animal is going to be able to shred hanging bags, they are going to shred the tent as well. In my experience, both are made of the same material.

If an animal knows that a hanging bag is food, they also know that a tent is food. We have had bears enter tents in Colorado. We have had bears enter cars, garages, houses and even restaurants. All of those reek of humans but bears still go inside because they smell food. People arenít really going to concern them much, especially if the bear is habituated to human food.

The main reason that I keep my food out of my tent and I hang my food (as well as any food waste if there arenít bear proof trash cans available) is to avoid habituating a bear to human food. A habituated bear is a dead bear walking. My state (and most others) has a 2 strikes rule. The first time a bear is caught around human food, it is tagged and moved. If it gets caught again around human food, it is killed. Even if hanging food were completely ineffective, I do it to keep a bear alive.

I camp in places where there are no trees all the time. Out on the plains, I donít have to worry about bears since they no longer range there. Above timberline, I put my food away from my tent. Thereís not much for bears to eat above 11,500 feet but they might range there. I still keep food out of my tent.

Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy View Post
Food smells: you eat dinner, you go to bed. You don't think you reek of food? You really scrub all traces of odor from your hands and face and brush your teeth? Even your clothes reek of food after you cook. We put all our food and anything with any sort of food-like odor into smell-proof plastic bags, separate from our bags, which we also bring into the tent. The only thing we leave outside are our cooking utensils and dishes and our hiking poles.
Concentration. Itís a matter of concentration of food odors. To mitigate food on my clothes, I cook food in my bike clothes or I have ďcooking clothesĒ. When I go to bed, I change to clothes that I donít cook in. Clothes that Iíve cooked in go into the bags that get hung up. I wash up before bed which drops the concentration of the food odors enough so that the ďreekingĒ of my human self might come through and keep those bears at bay.

Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy View Post
We have had 3 instances of tent chew-throughs by mice in the middle of the night, resulting in a great uproar and dead mice. We patched the holes with a small roll of rip-stop repair tape we always carry. That's irritating, but 3 out of maybe 500 tent-nights isn't too bad. And they didn't get any food!
Iíve never had any kind of chew-through on any tent in 40+ years of bicycle touring and 50+ years of camping. I also donít take food in my tent.

Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy View Post
We've done the same thing when bike touring. Only the bike is left outside, cabled to something convenient. Of course if there are bear boxes, or 20' high metal hanging frames, we use those, even easier than bagging everything. Critters can't climb metal poles. In mandatory bear canister areas, we've either left the canister outside, just sitting on the ground some distance away, or bagged it in the tent. Never attracted a bear either way. Except for that group of bears on the AT who know how to open bear canisters, I think bears know by now not to bother with them. Bears are very, very smart.
So you do use bear boxes if they are available. You just donít if they arenít. The bears are still there. And I agree that bears are smart. At least 5 or 6 per year figure out how to get into cars around here (often Subarus). But they are also fairly dumb as they canít figure out how to get out.

Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy View Post
We are not unique. Here's a good article on the issue: https://www.outsideonline.com/238614...gs-ineffective
Like the guy says, "few want to talk about it." I'm willing to because I've learned how to do it effectively.
He way over-blows how difficult hanging food is. It shouldnít take 15 minutes to do it. It takes me more time to tie a knot around a rock to throw into a tree than it does to hoist the food up there. It might take 15 minutes if you are rather inept at it but I would hope someone could learn how to do it and do it more efficiently. People are pretty smart.

And he does ďrodent hangĒ which is just a bit less involved than a bear hang. I also noticed that his complaint about ďspindly treesĒ shows limbs that are further out from the tree and could support hanging of food. His arguments against it are weak at best.

Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy View Post
Bike touring, this is really easy because you're not carrying 30 lbs. of food. Don't forget the toothpaste, toiletries, and snacks - everything goes in the bag before you sleep.
Yep. Everything goes in the bag...or, rather, stays in the bag...before it goes up. And how much food I carry depends on the type of touring I do. I carry 3 days of food, at least, when I road tour because Iíve never found food to be as available without long detours off route. For off-road, back-country tours, I carry up to a week off food (I donít do much more than week off-road because of the routes). But off-road I carry freeze-dried. 30 lbs of freeze-dried would be expensive and enough for 5 to 6 weeks of off-road touring.
__________________
Stuart Black
Gold Fever Three days of dirt in Colorado
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
cyccommute is offline  
Old 06-01-20, 10:35 AM
  #63  
djb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Montreal Canada
Posts: 11,508
Mentioned: 31 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2061 Post(s)
Liked 490 Times in 416 Posts
how I was brought up doing outdoor stuff food safety wise is pretty much in line what cycco said, and pretty much is in line with the common take on it, so won't change lifelong habits taught early on.

Now here is an important point in my opinion, I certainly dont have the backwoods experience a lot of you do, and have never personally experienced any bear food problems BUT I have seen on numerous occasions people get their tents chewed through by mice, or tent screen entrances broken by raccoons during the day. On some sort of canoe trip with friends and our kids eons ago, we had dry bags nibbled through by mice even though they were hung up, not quite sure how that happened, but all I want to say is that in all likelihood, the chances are pretty high that your nice equipment will get ruined by not human killing bears, but the smaller little critters.

still a pain, and still a drag that holes get chewed in good equipment that will then leak in rain, or let bugs in with busted zippers or whatever.

good light tents aint cheap, so it would be a real shame to have your 500 600 dollar tent chewed through by rodents, and a total PITA for repair.
djb is offline  
Old 06-01-20, 12:56 PM
  #64  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 23,989

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, an orange one and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 121 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4102 Post(s)
Liked 1,592 Times in 974 Posts
Originally Posted by djb View Post
how I was brought up doing outdoor stuff food safety wise is pretty much in line what cycco said, and pretty much is in line with the common take on it, so won't change lifelong habits taught early on.

Now here is an important point in my opinion, I certainly dont have the backwoods experience a lot of you do, and have never personally experienced any bear food problems BUT I have seen on numerous occasions people get their tents chewed through by mice, or tent screen entrances broken by raccoons during the day. On some sort of canoe trip with friends and our kids eons ago, we had dry bags nibbled through by mice even though they were hung up, not quite sure how that happened, but all I want to say is that in all likelihood, the chances are pretty high that your nice equipment will get ruined by not human killing bears, but the smaller little critters.

still a pain, and still a drag that holes get chewed in good equipment that will then leak in rain, or let bugs in with busted zippers or whatever.

good light tents aint cheap, so it would be a real shame to have your 500 600 dollar tent chewed through by rodents, and a total PITA for repair.

Just to be clear, I believe that bears are in the same category as snipes, Big Foot and unicorns. They donít exist! Iíve wondered through the Colorado Rockies as well as much of the US for all my life. Iíve never seen a bear in the wild. Iím convinced that bears in zoos are products of Disneyís SFX lab

The only bear Iíve seen outside of a zoo was in New Jersey...of all places! Still not convinced that it wasnít a very large dog*





* I know it was a bear but the story is better if I deny the existence of bears.
__________________
Stuart Black
Gold Fever Three days of dirt in Colorado
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
cyccommute is offline  
Old 06-01-20, 01:33 PM
  #65  
Digger Goreman
Quidam Bike Super Hero
 
Digger Goreman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Stone Mountain, GA (Metro Atlanta, East)
Posts: 965

Bikes: 1995 Trek 800 Sport, aka, "Frankentrek"/"Camel-Trek"

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 272 Post(s)
Liked 303 Times in 211 Posts
My untried (and possibly flawed) search fu has rodentia repelled by vinegar. Any practical collaboration?
Digger Goreman is offline  
Old 06-01-20, 02:50 PM
  #66  
Miele Man
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 4,290

Bikes: iele Latina, Miele Suprema, Miele Uno LS, Miele Miele Beta, MMTB, Bianchi Model Unknown, Fiori Venezia, Fiori Napoli, VeloSport Adamas AX

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1166 Post(s)
Liked 732 Times in 509 Posts
Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
Just to be clear, I believe that bears are in the same category as snipes, Big Foot and unicorns. They donít exist! Iíve wondered through the Colorado Rockies as well as much of the US for all my life. Iíve never seen a bear in the wild. Iím convinced that bears in zoos are products of Disneyís SFX lab

The only bear Iíve seen outside of a zoo was in New Jersey...of all places! Still not convinced that it wasnít a very large dog*





* I know it was a bear but the story is better if I deny the existence of bears.
LOL

I was riding along a dirt logging/mining road in Northern Ontario, Canada and came across a large area that'd been burned out in the Great Fire of 1922
(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Fire_of_1922) and saw a large open area just teeming with blue berries. I was going to venture over there and pick some until i saw a couple of big black bears, and then a couple of more and then some more. I don't know how many were in that berry patch gorging themselves but I figured I'd just continue on. No berries for me that day. LOL

The area around Matachewan, Ontario has a lot of bears. there used to be a spring bear hunt there and hunters came from all over - even from the deep south of the U.S.A.

Cheers
Miele Man is offline  
Old 06-01-20, 02:52 PM
  #67  
Tourist in MSN
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 8,180

Bikes: 1961 Ideor, 1994 Bridgestone MB-6, 2006 Airnimal Joey, 2009 Thorn Sherpa, 2013 Thorn Nomad MkII, 2015 VO Pass Hunter, 2017 Lynskey Backroad, 2017 Raleigh Gran Prix, Perfekt 3 Speed -age unknown, 1980s Bianchi Mixte on a trainer. Others are now gone.

Mentioned: 37 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2240 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 512 Times in 420 Posts
Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
Just to be clear, I believe that bears are in the same category as snipes, Big Foot and unicorns. They donít exist! Iíve wondered through the Colorado Rockies as well as much of the US for all my life. Iíve never seen a bear in the wild. Iím convinced that bears in zoos are products of Disneyís SFX lab

The only bear Iíve seen outside of a zoo was in New Jersey...of all places! Still not convinced that it wasnít a very large dog*

* I know it was a bear but the story is better if I deny the existence of bears.
I decided to wait for a while before I started pedaling again after seeing the bear near the road up ahead as I was riding out of Waterton Park in Canada just north of Glacier National Park.



Several years ago on a kayak trip, I was camping on an island in the Apostle Isles. I was organizing some of the food in the bear box. Noticed a bear in the distance with her cub slowly looking for blue berries as they browsed through the brush and approached our site. Then the bear stood up on back legs and looked like she was getting a good sniff, and then the bear and cub started moving away from the campsite. That was before I owned a digital camera.

Later that day I saw one of the park rangers, I congratulated him on how well they had trained their bears. I described the sighting, he asked if she had a tag in both ears and I said yes. He then said, yeah I know which one you are talking about.

***

Yes, I know you were joking. But if you were not so careful with your food, you might see more bears.
Tourist in MSN is offline  
Old 06-02-20, 09:40 AM
  #68  
phughes
Senior Member
 
phughes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 2,145
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 606 Post(s)
Liked 537 Times in 323 Posts
Originally Posted by Digger Goreman View Post
My untried (and possibly flawed) search fu has rodentia repelled by vinegar. Any practical collaboration?
I hang my food bag, but ammonia works well as a repellant. We use it at home to keep animals away from the trash. Very effective. I have considered using it on tour, but don't know if I want to smell ammonia all night.
phughes is offline  
Old 06-02-20, 09:51 AM
  #69  
phughes
Senior Member
 
phughes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 2,145
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 606 Post(s)
Liked 537 Times in 323 Posts
Originally Posted by Fissile View Post
I have a Hennessy Hammock. These are pictures of a test set-up from several years ago. I can get the hammock and sleeping bag, into a single pannier with a bit of room to spare. Be advised, a hammock is really a warm weather option. Cooler weather will require an under-quilt or you'll freeze.


I'm sort of shocked at how big the Hennesy is packed up. The Warbonnet Blackbird packs much smaller. I didn't think there would be so big of a difference.

Here is the Blackbird, and the Mamajamba tarp packed, and in the Ortlieb Classic Back Rollers. They compress a lot more as well if necessary, but they really take very little room, and with the stakes I use, weigh only 2.5 lbs, maybe a bit less.



phughes is offline  
Old 06-02-20, 10:03 AM
  #70  
Fissile
Senior Member
 
Fissile's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 611
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 32 Post(s)
Liked 14 Times in 13 Posts
[QUOTE=phughes;21511106]I'm sort of shocked at how big the Hennesy is packed up. The Warbonnet Blackbird packs much smaller. I didn't think there would be so big of a difference.

Here is the Blackbird, and the Mamajamba tarp packed, and in the Ortlieb Classic Back Rollers. They compress a lot more as well if necessary, but they really take very little room, and with the stakes I use, weigh only 2.5 lbs, maybe a bit less.

/QUOTE]

The hammock is on the right...rain fly included. The thing on the left is a North Face 3 season bag. I no longer use the stuff sack for the hammock...switched to snake skin.
Fissile is offline  
Likes For Fissile:
Old 06-02-20, 10:21 AM
  #71  
Fissile
Senior Member
 
Fissile's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 611
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 32 Post(s)
Liked 14 Times in 13 Posts
Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
Just to be clear, I believe that bears are in the same category as snipes, Big Foot and unicorns. They donít exist! Iíve wondered through the Colorado Rockies as well as much of the US for all my life. Iíve never seen a bear in the wild. Iím convinced that bears in zoos are products of Disneyís SFX lab

The only bear Iíve seen outside of a zoo was in New Jersey...of all places! Still not convinced that it wasnít a very large dog*





* I know it was a bear but the story is better if I deny the existence of bears.
I live in Jersey...10 miles from NYC and we've had a bear in the back yard on at least one occasion. North Jersey and Northeast Pennsylvania have the highest concentration of black bears anywhere in the US. Very little hunting pressure and lots of trash cans and dumpsters full of half eaten meatball heroes and pork roll sammiches is the reason. The bears around here are half tame. They're not interested in people, all they want is your pick-a-nick basket. As long as you don't get between a Jersey bear and its meatball hero, you're fine. So if you're in Jersey and a bear got a hold of your sammich, forget it man, it's gone.

None of the above apply if you're in other parts of the US Murica where brown bears and polar bears can be found. Brown bears and polar bears will kill people just for the lulz. Srsly, brown bears and polar bears are dangerous and should not be farked with.
Fissile is offline  
Old 06-02-20, 10:26 AM
  #72  
Digger Goreman
Quidam Bike Super Hero
 
Digger Goreman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Stone Mountain, GA (Metro Atlanta, East)
Posts: 965

Bikes: 1995 Trek 800 Sport, aka, "Frankentrek"/"Camel-Trek"

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 272 Post(s)
Liked 303 Times in 211 Posts
Originally Posted by phughes View Post
I hang my food bag, but ammonia works well as a repellant. We use it at home to keep animals away from the trash. Very effective. I have considered using it on tour, but don't know if I want to smell ammonia all night.
The ammonia is supposed to be for bears and snakes, in an internet article. I wouldn't want it near the tent either.
Digger Goreman is offline  
Likes For Digger Goreman:
Old 06-02-20, 11:07 AM
  #73  
phughes
Senior Member
 
phughes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 2,145
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 606 Post(s)
Liked 537 Times in 323 Posts
[QUOTE=Fissile;21511127]
Originally Posted by phughes View Post
I'm sort of shocked at how big the Hennesy is packed up. The Warbonnet Blackbird packs much smaller. I didn't think there would be so big of a difference.

Here is the Blackbird, and the Mamajamba tarp packed, and in the Ortlieb Classic Back Rollers. They compress a lot more as well if necessary, but they really take very little room, and with the stakes I use, weigh only 2.5 lbs, maybe a bit less.

/QUOTE]

The hammock is on the right...rain fly included. The thing on the left is a North Face 3 season bag. I no longer use the stuff sack for the hammock...switched to snake skin.
That makes more sense.

I have thought about using snake skins, but like the stuff sack that came with the Blackbird. I can keep it on the hammock since it is open at both ends, and simply unclip the hammock from one tree, and stuff the hammock back into it, then unclip the other end. Really nice and easy.
phughes is offline  
Old 06-02-20, 04:55 PM
  #74  
seedsbelize 
smelling the roses
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Tixkokob, YucatŠn, Mťxico
Posts: 15,159

Bikes: 79 Trek 930, 80 Trek 414, 84 Schwinn Letour Luxe (coupled), 92 Schwinn Paramount PDG 5

Mentioned: 104 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6930 Post(s)
Liked 832 Times in 560 Posts
Originally Posted by PedalingWalrus View Post
You don't just buy a $50 hammock and sleep in it. Maybe in 100 degree heat but anything else is dependent on a draft of air on the underside of the hammock which ranges unnerving to flat out CBS (Cold Butt Syndrome)

You need an underquilt and a top quilt and a tarp - as such the hammock setup is usually not a lighter option than tent but it all depends on how you choose your components.

There is a technique in how you pitch and sleep in a hammock which does not result in back ache. Some might say to he contrary that hammock sleep is more comfortable than a tent sleep
I will be the one. I live in Yucatan, and LIVE in my hammock. I have a Hennessy that I haven't had the chance to use yet, except in the back yard. The cold air underneath was indeed a problem. I have thought about a lightweight bivy instead of an underquilt.
__________________
Originally Posted by Velo Vol View Post
Don't you have to actually ride your bike to be considered an "addict"?





seedsbelize is offline  
Old 06-02-20, 07:27 PM
  #75  
Carbonfiberboy 
just another gosling
 
Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Everett, WA
Posts: 17,481

Bikes: CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004

Mentioned: 106 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2950 Post(s)
Liked 865 Times in 653 Posts
Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
Just to be clear, I believe that bears are in the same category as snipes, Big Foot and unicorns. They don’t exist! I’ve wondered through the Colorado Rockies as well as much of the US for all my life. I’ve never seen a bear in the wild. I’m convinced that bears in zoos are products of Disney’s SFX lab

The only bear I’ve seen outside of a zoo was in New Jersey...of all places! Still not convinced that it wasn’t a very large dog*





* I know it was a bear but the story is better if I deny the existence of bears.
We see black bears when we hike in the Cascades. Not an issue. Funny about the tent damage fears. We've worn out 3 tents, just using them. Never had any serious animal damage, just the three 1" holes from mouse attacks over the hundreds of tent nights. Fear isn't healthy. I feel totally safe in the woods, much safer than anywhere else. Typical campsite. So you got your 2 X 50' parachute cords and your rescue pulley and your special throwing rock and . . .
What I'm really looking for is some nice flat rocks to build into my camp kitchen. Some nice kitchens I've built have lasted for years. There are abandoned FS pit toilets that only my wife and I remember where they are.
That's also our bike touring tent.

__________________
Results matter
Carbonfiberboy is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.