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new tire sidewall abrasion diy fix/protection ideas?

Old 07-31-20, 08:00 AM
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new tire sidewall abrasion diy fix/protection ideas?

Ive had this folded spare tire for a bunch of years now, never used it, and carried it folded in the bottom of my clothes pannier for a few trips and saw recently when mounting it that it has some abrasion on the sidewall. I should have been more aware of this happening as Ive had a spare tube get abrasions from being in a seatbag too long without a bag around it to protect it, but didnt occur to me that a tough tire could have the same thing.
Live and Learn eh

Its not horrible horrible, but a pain given that I put the unused tire on my bike specifically to have a new rear tire for a potential upcoming 5 day trip, plus its an expensive unused tire....
The sidewall cord is not cut or anything, and Ive left it pumped up for a day or so and it appears to be not changing.

So, my thoughts are to put a Parks sticky boot on the inside of tire as a precaution , but would like some actual experienced recommendations on "shoring up" the sidewall rubber to give the inner cords at least some limited physical protection

my first ideas are Shoe-Goo, rubber cement?? Shoe Goo is probably tougher and might have some flexibility also
I figured I'd put this out to get some of your experienced ideas / actual things anyone has done / etc etc

thanks
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Old 07-31-20, 08:19 AM
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for others to know, saw this post on a mtb forum where someone had very positive results from using BLACK Shoe-Goo

https://forums.mtbr.com/fat-bikes/bl...s-1040785.html

I'll keep researching.
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Old 07-31-20, 09:03 AM
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Shoe goo is often recommended, but truth be told I usually just ignore such abrasions. Not saying that is the best approach, but I have not generally found that tires actually fail at the sites of such damage, unless it is worse than it looks in the picture. On the other hand a little shoe goo isn't going to hurt anything,

Another product that might work is Aqua seal. I have used it on all kinds of outdoor gear, but most often whitewater boating gear. It dries clear and tough and seems to adhere to just about anything. I have never used it on tires though. They have a version of the product that is meant for shoes, but I'd use the regular stuff myself if trying it.

The tire doesn't look structurally compromised to me. Maybe the cord might be subject to UV damage over time if not covered with something. A thin coat of shoe goo would do that well enough. On the other hand, like I said I have gotten by with just ignoring damage like that.
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Old 07-31-20, 09:06 AM
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A couple layers of Gorilla tape, on outside and/or inside ? Used it successfully for sidewall blowouts and cuts in the past. Be interesting how the Shoe Goo resists abrasion.
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Old 07-31-20, 09:21 AM
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Originally Posted by robow View Post
A couple layers of Gorilla tape, on outside and/or inside ? Used it successfully for sidewall blowouts and cuts in the past. Be interesting how the Shoe Goo resists abrasion.
which begs the question.....why have a spare tire when God has given us Gorilla tape?
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Old 07-31-20, 09:55 AM
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I assume that is outside of tire, not inside.

I would use either Seam Grip or black Shoe Goo. Seam Grip is a bit less viscous, I think it has more volatile compounds in it that evaporate. Seam Grip can be a bit sticky when hard, Shoe Goo less so. And I think Seam Grip adheres to surfaces better than Shoe Goo. Shoe Goo is obviously made to be abrasion resistant, but Seam Grip is not designed for that purpose.

If I had the tire in my hands to look at, I could probably say which I think would work better, but lacking that I can't say.

I have no clue if Mec sells this or not.
https://www.rei.com/product/603034/g...ip-seam-sealer

I have found clear Shoe Goo easy to find in stores, but not the black. I ordered my tube of black from Amazon.

If you use the Seam Grip, the entire tube can harden once openned within a few months. But I find it lasts longer if I put it in a glass jar with air tight lid and then store it in the freezer. It is rare when I use up an entire tube of Seam Grip before it has hardened in the tube. My Shoe Goo tubes seem to last for years without that special kind of care.
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Old 07-31-20, 10:11 AM
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Originally Posted by staehpj1 View Post
Shoe goo is often recommended, but truth be told I usually just ignore such abrasions. Not saying that is the best approach, but I have not generally found that tires actually fail at the sites of such damage, unless it is worse than it looks in the picture. On the other hand a little shoe goo isn't going to hurt anything,

Another product that might work is Aqua seal. I have used it on all kinds of outdoor gear, but most often whitewater boating gear. It dries clear and tough and seems to adhere to just about anything. I have never used it on tires though. They have a version of the product that is meant for shoes, but I'd use the regular stuff myself if trying it.

The tire doesn't look structurally compromised to me. Maybe the cord might be subject to UV damage over time if not covered with something. A thin coat of shoe goo would do that well enough. On the other hand, like I said I have gotten by with just ignoring damage like that.
Ive only had a few sidewall issues in my biking experience, and while I agree with you that the cord structures look good, given that these Supreme tires have such a thin flexible sidewall, I'm sure it would be wise to do the outer shoe-goo thing to cover it up a bit, and while Im at it, I'm keen to put a sticky on Parks boot, just because they seem to be great for staying in place.
Going from the other recommendations of Shoe-Goo being less sticky etc, I'll try to find some.
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Old 07-31-20, 10:13 AM
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for everyone, a pretty interesting test some youtube dude did using multiple sidewall tear fixes on teh same tire, to compare each.
Worth watching--spoiler alert--the folded American dollar bill trick really worked well.

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Old 07-31-20, 10:17 AM
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Originally Posted by boomhauer View Post
which begs the question.....why have a spare tire when God has given us Gorilla tape?
which also begs the question and makes me laugh--I schlepped this folded tire around through a third or so of Mexico, through Central America to Costa Rica, with nary a problem with the tires on the bike, and in the meantime, the bottom of my pannier did this to this expensive spare tire......

the whole reason I decided to use this tire is because my original Supremes are getting tired, and if I do this 5 day trip, there will be times that I'm not near roads, and so a problem would mean a pain in the arse walk of the bike....
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Old 07-31-20, 10:42 AM
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Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN View Post
I assume that is outside of tire, not inside.

I would use either Seam Grip or black Shoe Goo. Seam Grip is a bit less viscous, I think it has more volatile compounds in it that evaporate. Seam Grip can be a bit sticky when hard, Shoe Goo less so. And I think Seam Grip adheres to surfaces better than Shoe Goo. Shoe Goo is obviously made to be abrasion resistant, but Seam Grip is not designed for that purpose.

If I had the tire in my hands to look at, I could probably say which I think would work better, but lacking that I can't say.

I have no clue if Mec sells this or not.
https://www.rei.com/product/603034/g...ip-seam-sealer

I have found clear Shoe Goo easy to find in stores, but not the black. I ordered my tube of black from Amazon.

If you use the Seam Grip, the entire tube can harden once openned within a few months. But I find it lasts longer if I put it in a glass jar with air tight lid and then store it in the freezer. It is rare when I use up an entire tube of Seam Grip before it has hardened in the tube. My Shoe Goo tubes seem to last for years without that special kind of care.
thanks TMsn for the details, appreciated.
Yup, its abrasion on the outside of the tire. Will look around for some black shoe goo, but truth be told, some stores are rather down on stock, so I'll take what I can get, especially if I end up doing the trip.
I'll take the tire off and really check the inside of the tire, there may be nothing on the inside, but may consider a boot more out of caution. I have read of boots over time possibly causing issues to tubes with rubbing, but we'll see when I take the tire off again.
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Old 07-31-20, 02:46 PM
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Originally Posted by djb View Post
thanks TMsn for the details, appreciated.
Yup, its abrasion on the outside of the tire. Will look around for some black shoe goo, but truth be told, some stores are rather down on stock, so I'll take what I can get, especially if I end up doing the trip.
I'll take the tire off and really check the inside of the tire, there may be nothing on the inside, but may consider a boot more out of caution. I have read of boots over time possibly causing issues to tubes with rubbing, but we'll see when I take the tire off again.
Originally Posted by djb View Post
Ive only had a few sidewall issues in my biking experience, and while I agree with you that the cord structures look good, given that these Supreme tires have such a thin flexible sidewall, I'm sure it would be wise to do the outer shoe-goo thing to cover it up a bit, and while Im at it, I'm keen to put a sticky on Parks boot, just because they seem to be great for staying in place.
Going from the other recommendations of Shoe-Goo being less sticky etc, I'll try to find some.
I figure a boot where not needed is likely to cause more problems than not using one. It may eventually rub a hole in the tube, but I guess that isn't the end of the world. I just don't see a reason to add one unless the casing is structurally damaged. But I guess that is a judgement call.

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Old 07-31-20, 03:11 PM
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Originally Posted by staehpj1 View Post
I figure a boot where not needed is likely to cause more problems than not using one. It may eventually rub a hole in the tube, but I guess that isn't the end of the world. I just don't see a reason to add one unless the casing is structurally damaged. But I guess that is a judgement call.
thanks Stae, I've kind of come to this conclusion also. I'll take the tire off again just to carefully inspect the inner area and if there arent any marks or anything inside, I'll just go with the goo try out. I did end up buying a Parks boot kit, the sticking ones, and I figure it will be good to put one in my kit to be there in any case.
A mechanic I know told me today that yes, sometimes boots will cause rubbing issues on tubes over time as you say, and that the times he has booted a tire, he has also put some tape over the boot to have less of an edge present--which to me makes sense, and was good to hear from someone that I feel knows his stuff and has experience.
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Old 07-31-20, 03:23 PM
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Originally Posted by djb View Post
thanks Stae, I've kind of come to this conclusion also. I'll take the tire off again just to carefully inspect the inner area and if there arent any marks or anything inside, I'll just go with the goo try out. I did end up buying a Parks boot kit, the sticking ones, and I figure it will be good to put one in my kit to be there in any case.
A mechanic I know told me today that yes, sometimes boots will cause rubbing issues on tubes over time as you say, and that the times he has booted a tire, he has also put some tape over the boot to have less of an edge present--which to me makes sense, and was good to hear from someone that I feel knows his stuff and has experience.
Sounds prudent. If you do see signs of structural damage and are nervous about it a boot isn't the end of the world, but I generally only go there if either there is a hole or the tire bulges a little at that spot. Personaly I wouldn't be too worried based on the picture.
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Old 07-31-20, 03:52 PM
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In USA there are post office envelopes that are made of Tyvek. I have no clue if they are used in Canada or not. I cut pieces of that Tyvek to carry with my spare tubes in case I need a tire boot. Never needed one yet, but I keep my spare tubes in zip lock bags and a piece of Tyvek is in most of those zip locks.

If you put some Shoe Goo or Seam Grip on your inside tire to protect the cord, you might want to have a piece of Tyvek or some other tire boot material against the stuff you add to the tire to make sure that the inner tube does not stick to the stuff you added to the tire. Or, maybe some talc powder would serve that purpose.

Some tours I carry a spare tire, some I do not. When I carry a spare, it is not a replacement tire to replace one of the tires I am rolling on, instead my spare is the lightest and most compact tire in a useable size that would fit on the bike to get me to the nearest bike shop. Example, my trip last summer in Canadian Maritimes, I had read that it is almost impossible to buy a bike tire on Cape Breton Island so I carried a spare. I used 57mm wide tires on the bike and I think my tires were rated at 650 grams (before I wore off some of the tread), but my spare was rated at 47mm wide and it was 430 grams on my scale. And my spare is in a zip lock baggie too.

When I was in college, I drove a long distance for a summer school program in another state that I needed to attend for my major, drove that in my old 65 Ford F250 pickup truck, it had inner tubes. Got a flat tire in the middle of the night. The garage that fixed my flat told me that there was a little bit of something like a sand grain that had worn a hole into the inner tube that caused my flat. Ever since then I have been careful to keep my spare bike tubes and tires in plastic bags to keep them clean to make sure that I did not accidentally add a sand grain to a tire if I had to change a tube while out on the road or trail.

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Old 07-31-20, 03:58 PM
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I have had a tube develop a flat where I used a few layers of Gorilla tape as a boot, but.......it was one of those "I'll replace and repair it when I get home" type of things but I forgot about it and well over a year later and many many miles, it blew. I probably would have been fine had I just turned the tube around during that year and changed the contact point.
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Old 07-31-20, 04:08 PM
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Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN View Post
In USA there are post office envelopes that are made of Tyvek. I have no clue if they are used in Canada or not. I cut pieces of that Tyvek to carry with my spare tubes in case I need a tire boot. Never needed one yet, but I keep my spare tubes in zip lock bags and a piece of Tyvek is in most of those zip locks.

If you put some Shoe Goo or Seam Grip on your inside tire to protect the cord, you might want to have a piece of Tyvek or some other tire boot material against the stuff you add to the tire to make sure that the inner tube does not stick to the stuff you added to the tire. Or, maybe some talc powder would serve that purpose.

Some tours I carry a spare tire, some I do not. When I carry a spare, it is not a replacement tire to replace one of the tires I am rolling on, instead my spare is the lightest and most compact tire in a useable size that would fit on the bike to get me to the nearest bike shop. Example, my trip last summer in Canadian Maritimes, I had read that it is almost impossible to buy a bike tire on Cape Breton Island so I carried a spare. I used 57mm wide tires on the bike and I think my tires were rated at 650 grams (before I wore off some of the tread), but my spare was rated at 47mm wide and it was 430 grams on my scale. And my spare is in a zip lock baggie too.

When I was in college, I drove a long distance for a summer school program in another state that I needed to attend for my major, drove that in my old 65 Ford F250 pickup truck, it had inner tubes. Got a flat tire in the middle of the night. The garage that fixed my flat told me that there was a little bit of something like a sand grain that had worn a hole into the inner tube that caused my flat. Ever since then I have been careful to keep my spare bike tubes and tires in plastic bags to keep them clean to make sure that I did not accidentally add a sand grain to a tire if I had to change a tube while out on the road or trail.
re tyvek envelopes, I meant to stop at the post office today and just get one, but forgot. Will look around the house in case there is one, but this sounds like a great idea.
and yup, I learned to keep my tubes in bags also, but with cars, I'm not as ancient as you are, so never had inner tube car tires ;-)

the spare tire concept of lightest as possible, does make sense. For the Latin American trips, I just figured I might as well get the same tire, and that way I wouldnt have to worry about trying to find a suitable tire.
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Old 07-31-20, 04:10 PM
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Originally Posted by robow View Post
I have had a tube develop a flat where I used a few layers of Gorilla tape as a boot, but.......it was one of those "I'll replace and repair it when I get home" type of things but I forgot about it and well over a year later and many many miles, it blew. I probably would have been fine had I just turned the tube around during that year and changed the contact point.
pretty much exactly why I figure that if there isnt any physical markings on the inside of the tire, its probably best not to put in anything, as I know I'll forget about it...but will be interesting to see how the shoegoo works out.
Couldnt find any black, so just went with the regular.
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Old 07-31-20, 04:26 PM
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Originally Posted by djb View Post
..., but with cars, I'm not as ancient as you are, so never had inner tube car tires ;-)
....
That truck was ancient when I bought it. But I was a college student without a lot of money.
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Old 07-31-20, 05:17 PM
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Originally Posted by djb View Post
I'm not as ancient as you are, so never had inner tube car tires ;-)
As a teenager working part time in a gas station for a buck an hour I put lots of tubes in tubeless car tires when someone had a tire that wouldn't hold air if they didn't want to spring for a new tire. Also lots of cars still on the road weren't tubeless. Not sure if my first car had tubes or not (I forget after all these years).
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Old 07-31-20, 06:32 PM
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I know tmsn, figured it must have been an old clunker when you had it.
both of you know I just couldn't resist that....

Earlier I put a layer of shoe goo on the exposed threads area, will probably put a second layer on before bed.
hopefully get my junk all together tomorrow morning into panniers and try to get a ride in
am still a bit undecided if I'll do this 5 day trip, have to juggle a bunch of family stuff, and also if the weather looks really rainy blah I might take a pass.
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Old 08-01-20, 05:15 AM
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Originally Posted by djb View Post
I know tmsn, figured it must have been an old clunker when you had it.
both of you know I just couldn't resist that....

Earlier I put a layer of shoe goo on the exposed threads area, will probably put a second layer on before bed.
hopefully get my junk all together tomorrow morning into panniers and try to get a ride in
am still a bit undecided if I'll do this 5 day trip, have to juggle a bunch of family stuff, and also if the weather looks really rainy blah I might take a pass.
I hope you manage to get a great trip in.
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Old 08-01-20, 07:01 AM
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Originally Posted by djb View Post
pretty much exactly why I figure that if there isnt any physical markings on the inside of the tire, its probably best not to put in anything, as I know I'll forget about it...but will be interesting to see how the shoegoo works out.
Couldnt find any black, so just went with the regular.
as long as no damage to the threads, you should be fine.
i don't believe the outer rubber provides any support, just the wear-off consumable bit.
but definitely want to protect the threads from uv and sand and water.
shoe goo sounds good. but what about engine gasket goo?
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Old 08-04-20, 07:28 AM
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Originally Posted by robow View Post
A couple layers of Gorilla tape, on outside and/or inside ? Used it successfully for sidewall blowouts and cuts in the past. Be interesting how the Shoe Goo resists abrasion.
Just be careful that any Gorilla tape doesn't loosen and catch in your brake pads... oh, and don't ask me why I know about this
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Old 08-04-20, 08:22 AM
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Originally Posted by imi View Post
Just be careful that any Gorilla tape doesn't loosen and catch in your brake pads... oh, and don't ask me why I know about this
I ended up not putting any inner stuff in, ie tape or one of the parks adhesive boots I bought, but thanks for the heads up.
Disc rim so at least not an issue.
I did put shoegoo on the outside to cover the exposed threads. Holding so so but a loaded ride showed that tire flexing dislodged a bit. Will redo and maybe put more.
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Old 08-04-20, 09:34 AM
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robow
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On small abrasions to the outside sidewall, I have used Super Glue Gel which seemed to hold fairly well and kept fibers from unraveling (think Continental) but probably offer only minor protection.
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