Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Touring
Reload this Page >

Fuji Touring Disc is back.

Notices
Touring Have a dream to ride a bike across your state, across the country, or around the world? Self-contained or fully supported? Trade ideas, adventures, and more in our bicycle touring forum.

Fuji Touring Disc is back.

Old 08-17-20, 01:47 PM
  #1  
Nyah
No QR-disc or alumin F/Fs
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2018
Location: Shenandoah Valley, Northern Virginia.
Posts: 557

Bikes: '99 Trek 520, '20 Kona Sutra (FOR SALE 48cm), and a chromoly-framed folding bicycle with drop-bars and V-brakes, that rolls even while folded.

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 288 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 154 Times in 108 Posts
Fuji Touring Disc is back.

Original message deleted.

Edit:
I deleted this message because, after learning that this Fuji has QR-skewers instead of thru-axles, I can't recommend it. Bicycles that have both disc brakes and QR-skewers are a scam. I'm glad that I didn't buy such a bicycle and, I hope that nobody buys them anymore. Disc brakes only belong when thru-axles are employed.

Last edited by Nyah; 12-09-20 at 08:56 PM. Reason: Deleted in order to protect people from the scam that is disc brakes on bicycles with QR-release skewrs.
Nyah is offline  
Old 08-17-20, 04:23 PM
  #2  
Het Volk
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 266
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 142 Post(s)
Liked 102 Times in 59 Posts
Disc Brakes

I have not understood the need for these brakes on a Touring bike? I guess I envision that what I need for a touring bike is ability to repair it, and keep maintenance to a minimum. Adding a hydraulic brake and added mechanical complexity, not to mention increased weight just seems to outweigh any benefits. Perhaps, depending on the terrain, when fully loaded, the beneficial stopping power on a mountain pass might be necessary, but it seesm good old cantilever brakes have worked in these circumstances for years (and in some cases, they were single-pivot brakes such as on the Fuji America of the early 80's no less)

I was actually a little disappointed that Trek dropped a Cantilever 520 option in the latest model run. Unfortunately, it seems a self-reinforcing prophecy, that as companies initially pushed disc brakes, it ingrained in the public's mind that these brakes were absolutely so much better, that it inherently dropped demand for a cantilever options, which further led to manufacturers dropping such options.
Het Volk is offline  
Old 08-17-20, 05:24 PM
  #3  
Thruhiker 
Senior Member
 
Thruhiker's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2020
Location: Greencastle Pa
Posts: 128

Bikes: Fuji touring, jeep hybrid Trek 1100

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 54 Post(s)
Liked 28 Times in 20 Posts
I would think there would be room. I have 50mm Panaracer gravelkings on my 2018 fuji. I have rim brakes but I doubt the frame is any different.
Thruhiker is offline  
Old 08-17-20, 08:14 PM
  #4  
indyfabz
Senior Member
 
indyfabz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 35,060
Mentioned: 202 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16020 Post(s)
Liked 10,428 Times in 5,067 Posts
indyfabz is offline  
Old 08-17-20, 10:02 PM
  #5  
mstateglfr 
Sunshine
 
mstateglfr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Des Moines, IA
Posts: 14,632

Bikes: '18 class built steel roadbike, '19 Fairlight Secan, '88 Schwinn Premis , Black Mountain Cycles Monstercross V4, '89 Novara Trionfo

Mentioned: 116 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8615 Post(s)
Liked 5,251 Times in 3,030 Posts
Originally Posted by Het Volk View Post
I have not understood the need for these brakes on a Touring bike? I guess I envision that what I need for a touring bike is ability to repair it, and keep maintenance to a minimum. Adding a hydraulic brake and added mechanical complexity, not to mention increased weight just seems to outweigh any benefits. Perhaps, depending on the terrain, when fully loaded, the beneficial stopping power on a mountain pass might be necessary, but it seesm good old cantilever brakes have worked in these circumstances for years (and in some cases, they were single-pivot brakes such as on the Fuji America of the early 80's no less)

I was actually a little disappointed that Trek dropped a Cantilever 520 option in the latest model run. Unfortunately, it seems a self-reinforcing prophecy, that as companies initially pushed disc brakes, it ingrained in the public's mind that these brakes were absolutely so much better, that it inherently dropped demand for a cantilever options, which further led to manufacturers dropping such options.
The fuji bike that is the subject of this thread uses mechanical disc brakes.
Its a cable actuated brake just like you use for rim brakes.
It is no less relaible than whatever rim brake system you are comfortable with.

All my touring bikes have used rm brakes, so clearly I am content with them, but my hydrsulic disc gravel bike stops easier/better than any of the touring bikes. It isnt like I feel underpowered when braking on my cantilever bikes, but the hydrsulkc dosc brakes certainly are easier to actuate and inspire more confidence.

But again- the bike in question uses a cable actuated brake so your complaint about hydraulic brakes doesn't apply.


I find it neat that we have so many options for bikes right now.
mstateglfr is online now  
Likes For mstateglfr:
Old 08-18-20, 12:29 AM
  #6  
Het Volk
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 266
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 142 Post(s)
Liked 102 Times in 59 Posts
Originally Posted by mstateglfr View Post
The fuji bike that is the subject of this thread uses mechanical disc brakes.
Its a cable actuated brake just like you use for rim brakes.
It is no less relaible than whatever rim brake system you are comfortable with.

All my touring bikes have used rm brakes, so clearly I am content with them, but my hydrsulic disc gravel bike stops easier/better than any of the touring bikes. It isnt like I feel underpowered when braking on my cantilever bikes, but the hydrsulkc dosc brakes certainly are easier to actuate and inspire more confidence.

But again- the bike in question uses a cable actuated brake so your complaint about hydraulic brakes doesn't apply.


I find it neat that we have so many options for bikes right now.
I guess - especially if touring in the US, and near at least areas with decent bike shops nearby, the future will only provide more availability of repairs. So my complaint I guess slowly declines. I am also going slightly through a bit of an existential crisis of sorts....it just sucks to see all of your bikes slowly become obsolete from an industry focus standpoint.
Het Volk is offline  
Old 08-18-20, 08:05 AM
  #7  
mstateglfr 
Sunshine
 
mstateglfr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Des Moines, IA
Posts: 14,632

Bikes: '18 class built steel roadbike, '19 Fairlight Secan, '88 Schwinn Premis , Black Mountain Cycles Monstercross V4, '89 Novara Trionfo

Mentioned: 116 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8615 Post(s)
Liked 5,251 Times in 3,030 Posts
Originally Posted by Het Volk View Post
I guess - especially if touring in the US, and near at least areas with decent bike shops nearby, the future will only provide more availability of repairs. So my complaint I guess slowly declines. I am also going slightly through a bit of an existential crisis of sorts....it just sucks to see all of your bikes slowly become obsolete from an industry focus standpoint.
Road brake cables exist in the US, Canada, Europe, Asia, etc. That is what a mechanical disc brake like the one on the Fuji needs. Its literally the same cable as what anyone uses for their caliper or cantilever brakes. One of em is a handful of grams and can twist down to a few inches in diameter so its not exactly difficult to carry spares. And the brake pads are smaller than rim brake pads so carrying spares of those also isnt tough.
What % of touring is done in what anyone would consider 'remote' areas of the world?...5%?...less? For every one story about riding thru the center of Iceland or riding in an Asian desert, there are hundreds of people touring on river paths in Europe and going out on multi-day tours in their home state. Point is- while a brake may not work for the most extreme of situations, if it works great and is easy to repair for the super majority of time then its a well spec'd component. Someone thats going to ride to the Arctic circle is going to spec their own bike anyways so what a brand does on a stock bike is irrelevant.

As for your bikes slowly become obsolete from an industry focus perspective, I get it. All my frames are steel and I only have 1 disc brake bike so my bikes arent exactly examples of current industry trends. Touring hasnt been an industry focus for 30 years now. Its a niche style of cycling. I would be interested to see what % of LHTs sold are rim brake and disc brake. It would certainly help clarify if the industry is pushing one style or if demand is pushing one style.
mstateglfr is online now  
Old 08-18-20, 03:11 PM
  #8  
Pop N Wood
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2020
Location: Maryland
Posts: 1,163

Bikes: 1982 Bianchi Sport SX, Rayleigh Tamland 1, Rans V-Rex recumbent, Fuji MTB, 80's Cannondale MTB with BBSHD ebike motor

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 552 Post(s)
Liked 438 Times in 290 Posts
I have those TRP Spyre mechanical disc brakes on my touring bike and absolutely love them. Easiest brake I have ever set up, zero maintenance and like said above spare pads are small and easy to carry. Plus pads don't age like rubber bits do.

The three things I really like about disc brakes on a touring rig is first normal braking with a broken spoke, two better stopping when wet and three swapping in smaller diameter wheels to get clearance for fatter tires. With full fenders I can use 700x38c wheels for normal pavement and gravel, but swap to 650b wheels with 53c tubeless tires for trips on poorly maintained trails like the C&O.

Oh and haven't done it yet but can get anodized rims with no brake strips.

Your old bike isn't getting obsolete. This is just another flavor to enhance life.

Last edited by Pop N Wood; 08-18-20 at 06:17 PM.
Pop N Wood is offline  
Old 08-18-20, 03:20 PM
  #9  
Pop N Wood
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2020
Location: Maryland
Posts: 1,163

Bikes: 1982 Bianchi Sport SX, Rayleigh Tamland 1, Rans V-Rex recumbent, Fuji MTB, 80's Cannondale MTB with BBSHD ebike motor

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 552 Post(s)
Liked 438 Times in 290 Posts
By the way, Fuji has a non-disc version as well

https://www.fujibikes.com/usa/bikes/...ouring/touring

Three hundred cheaper through slightly lower end components.
Pop N Wood is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.