Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Touring
Reload this Page >

Any experience with modern Tarptent tents?

Notices
Touring Have a dream to ride a bike across your state, across the country, or around the world? Self-contained or fully supported? Trade ideas, adventures, and more in our bicycle touring forum.

Any experience with modern Tarptent tents?

Old 10-11-20, 12:10 PM
  #1  
KC8QVO
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 880

Bikes: Surly Disk Trucker, 2014 w/Brooks Flyer Special saddle, Tubus racks - Duo front/Logo Evo rear, 2019 Dahon Mariner D8, Both bikes share Ortlieb Packer Plus series panniers, Garmin Edge 1000

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 279 Post(s)
Liked 55 Times in 48 Posts
Any experience with modern Tarptent tents?

Does anyone have any experience with Tarptent tents in recent years?

The only one Ive seen in use was well over 10 years ago. It was a single wall Tyvek material design (white fabric) that a backpacking buddy used. It wasn't much more than a large bivy - similar to their current Protrail, just without a fly and solid single wall body construction.

It looks like they have morphed in to conventional materials and designs with the double wall construction (inside body with mesh and bathtub floor covered with a full-coverage/low fly). How well do they hold up? Do they take wind and heavy wind-driven rain well?

It looks like with one of those I could get down to the 3-4lb range. That would be a welcome weight/bulk reduction from my current tent, but if it means sacrificing too much sturdyness I'd still be inclined to carry the more robust tent I have. My next trek I won't have a choice, but maybe next year that can be different.
KC8QVO is offline  
Old 10-11-20, 12:27 PM
  #2  
DeadGrandpa
Philosopher of Bicycling
 
DeadGrandpa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Carolina
Posts: 980

Bikes: Too many, yet not enough.

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 371 Post(s)
Liked 145 Times in 107 Posts
Try doing a search on YouTube for "tyvek tarp tent". Tyvek is at least close to waterproof, and others have attempted what you are trying.
DeadGrandpa is offline  
Old 10-11-20, 12:38 PM
  #3  
KC8QVO
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 880

Bikes: Surly Disk Trucker, 2014 w/Brooks Flyer Special saddle, Tubus racks - Duo front/Logo Evo rear, 2019 Dahon Mariner D8, Both bikes share Ortlieb Packer Plus series panniers, Garmin Edge 1000

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 279 Post(s)
Liked 55 Times in 48 Posts
Originally Posted by DeadGrandpa View Post
Try doing a search on YouTube for "tyvek tarp tent". Tyvek is at least close to waterproof, and others have attempted what you are trying.
You missed the boat.

I am asking if anyone has modern experience with Tarptent tents - they are commercially made tents.

Where Tyvek came in was my comment that over 10 years ago a fellow backpacker I went on some trips with used one. That was my reference of NOT being modern experience.

Maybe a couple links would help.

Stratospire model:
https://www.tarptent.com/product/stratospire-1/

Scarp model:
https://www.tarptent.com/product/scarp-1/

Of course, there are several other models.
KC8QVO is offline  
Old 10-11-20, 12:42 PM
  #4  
skidder
Bipsycorider
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Orange County, California
Posts: 1,163

Bikes: Why yes, I do have a few! Thank you for asking!

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 509 Post(s)
Liked 208 Times in 158 Posts
If you're willing to spend some $$$ you could try one from this place:

https://www.tarptent.com/

I've got one of their older 'Cloudburst' models, bought about 15 years ago, and its held up well when I was doing a lot of backpacking/peakbagging. I used it in some windy environments (maybe 20-30 mph winds), some snowy conditions (not full-on blizzards), and its held up well. Single wall sil-nylon fabric (silicone coated nylon), aluminum poles, bathrtub foors. Only issue is the fabric is waterproof, so don't leave the tent fully closed at night or you'll wake up in a damp environment the next morning.
skidder is offline  
Old 10-11-20, 01:14 PM
  #5  
DeadGrandpa
Philosopher of Bicycling
 
DeadGrandpa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Carolina
Posts: 980

Bikes: Too many, yet not enough.

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 371 Post(s)
Liked 145 Times in 107 Posts
Originally Posted by KC8QVO View Post
You missed the boat.

I am asking if anyone has modern experience with Tarptent tents - they are commercially made tents.

Where Tyvek came in was my comment that over 10 years ago a fellow backpacker I went on some trips with used one. That was my reference of NOT being modern experience.

Maybe a couple links would help.

Stratospire model:
https://www.tarptent.com/product/stratospire-1/

Scarp model:
https://www.tarptent.com/product/scarp-1/

Of course, there are several other models.
Yes, I misunderstood. Didn't realize that Tarptent was a brand. Those linked above look fine. I suggest you look at REI.com. Their return policy is very helpful if you regret your purchase.

If you have a sudden windfall of money, look at Zpacks shelters. Wind and water proof, 2 person tent at 1.5 pounds. Duplex is similar to the stratospire, but way lighter and expensive.
DeadGrandpa is offline  
Old 10-11-20, 03:34 PM
  #6  
andrewclaus
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Golden, CO
Posts: 1,933

Bikes: 2016 Fuji Tread

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 367 Post(s)
Liked 124 Times in 96 Posts
Tarptents are extremely sturdy. Don't let the single wall of lightweight fabric fool you. My Contrail had 10,000 hiking miles and 6,000 biking miles on it before I replaced it a few years ago. And yes, I bought another Contrail. I'm sold on that shelter forever. Just over $200 if I remember right. They handle extremely high winds, hail, snow, desert and tundra.

My wife and I use a Double Rainbow when we travel together. We both agree it's the best tent we've ever owned. We got that for a one-week tour last year and have been using it for car camping since then. I think that one was about $300. There's a weight penalty for the long pole though.

I met Henry Shires at a gear expo and he's the real deal. I beta-tested an early floorless model for him nearly 20 years ago. I broke it and he replaced it right away. (I gave that one to a friend and it's still in service.) By all accounts I've heard the company stands by the product and you will get personal service.

A favorite photo of the Contrail on a ski tour:
andrewclaus is offline  
Likes For andrewclaus:
Old 10-12-20, 06:40 AM
  #7  
mev
bicycle tourist
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Austin, Texas, USA
Posts: 1,799

Bikes: Trek 520, Lightfoot Ranger, Trek 4500

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 262 Post(s)
Liked 54 Times in 45 Posts
I don't have experience with a tarp tent but have difficulty seeing the point for my purposes. Depending on my type of trip, I gravitate towards one of two solutions:

A. On an extended trip e.g. months or more; I like a more general purpose solution with a few attributes: (a) good shelter from the elements (b) flexibility in how/where I pitch it including freestanding as necessary. In this vein, I took an REI Quarterdome 2+ for an 18-month trip across the Americas and also on a 4 month trip across Africa. I took a Hubba-Hubba for a 10 month trip including across Russia. I found these to be general purpose reliable tents - that while pretty worn after trip of 18 or 6 or 10 months, did the job.
B. On a shorter trip where perhaps a tent isn't my primary shelter, e.g. a week or so trip or a longer trip but with camping more as a backup; I can take something that does basic job of sheltering. Light and inexpensive are two useful attributes and needs to at least handle weather. For this a basic tarp or tube tent can fit the bill.

The tarp tents on that site don't quite fit the bill for either of these points. Either they are essentially enough like a tent - that I can evaluate them as tents - though seem to be on the expensive side. Or they come after my quick shelter idea in which case they seem both heavier and considerably more expensive than a basic shelter.

After wearing out my most recent Quarterdome 2, I picked up another that I took on a trip this past week. The new model is pretty lightweight, though unfortunate for my purposes "semi-freestanding" meaning one needs to at least stake out the back corners. This is ok for weekend and week long trips now, but when I go on another extended expedition, I'll pick a different model of tent.
mev is offline  
Old 10-12-20, 08:40 AM
  #8  
KC8QVO
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 880

Bikes: Surly Disk Trucker, 2014 w/Brooks Flyer Special saddle, Tubus racks - Duo front/Logo Evo rear, 2019 Dahon Mariner D8, Both bikes share Ortlieb Packer Plus series panniers, Garmin Edge 1000

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 279 Post(s)
Liked 55 Times in 48 Posts
Originally Posted by mev View Post
I don't have experience with a tarp tent but have difficulty seeing the point for my purposes. Depending on my type of trip, I gravitate towards one of two solutions:

A. On an extended trip e.g. months or more; I like a more general purpose solution with a few attributes: (a) good shelter from the elements (b) flexibility in how/where I pitch it including freestanding as necessary. In this vein, I took an REI Quarterdome 2+ for an 18-month trip across the Americas and also on a 4 month trip across Africa. I took a Hubba-Hubba for a 10 month trip including across Russia. I found these to be general purpose reliable tents - that while pretty worn after trip of 18 or 6 or 10 months, did the job.
B. On a shorter trip where perhaps a tent isn't my primary shelter, e.g. a week or so trip or a longer trip but with camping more as a backup; I can take something that does basic job of sheltering. Light and inexpensive are two useful attributes and needs to at least handle weather. For this a basic tarp or tube tent can fit the bill.

The tarp tents on that site don't quite fit the bill for either of these points. Either they are essentially enough like a tent - that I can evaluate them as tents - though seem to be on the expensive side. Or they come after my quick shelter idea in which case they seem both heavier and considerably more expensive than a basic shelter.
Hmm. Interesting thoughts.

Of the tents that you can put in your category of a more robust tent - why do you say the Tarptent models closest to that still don't cut the mustard?

Reason I ask, is that, to me, if you add a solid interior the tents seem like regular tents to me. They just make use of lighter support options and/or trekking poles, as opposed to tent poles. So what about their construction or design, to you, makes them not fit?

I can understand the quick/light shelter idea.

The A frame tent I have is pretty small - sort of like the Pro Trail model only it doesn't taper on the far end (either side to side or top down). The reason I haven't used it beyond 1 backpacking trip (it has been on some car camping treks of sorts) is I can't stand bumping the sides in cold weather when condensation has formed. With more ventilation that would be better, and certainly with a proper fly. With that said, a small solo shelter like the Pro Trail - with a good fly - might be a good option to have. Though, it might be hard with that space to hunker down for a day of storms in it.
KC8QVO is offline  
Old 10-12-20, 12:54 PM
  #9  
CargoDane
Banned.
 
Join Date: Oct 2020
Posts: 839

Bikes: Bullitt Milk Plus, Dahon Smooth Hound, Ti Omnium Cargo w/Rohloff

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 325 Post(s)
Liked 296 Times in 183 Posts
People, he is not asking about using a tarp as a tent, but products from the manufacturer "TarpTent".

I recently bought a TarpTent Stratospire 2 with a "solid" inner tent (very little mesh).
I've only used as a test for a couple of days so far, and in general, I am very impressed with it. What I don't like (coming from decades of Hilleberg use), is the floor material in the inner tent. It seems very fragile (thin ripstop nylon) compared to the tafetta used in the Hillebergs.
I don't know if the bottom is actually "Nylon 66", but I'm going to buy some (in red, to liven up things) and swap it out to at least get the strongest of the lightest ripstop. I will replace the bottom if and when the one fitted as standard punctures/rips.

In a couple of weeks, I'm going out again for a short trip (small country, and living on an island, see) again, and maybe I'll revise my opinion.
Overall, I think they have excellent tents with a lot of good details.
CargoDane is offline  
Old 10-12-20, 02:02 PM
  #10  
mev
bicycle tourist
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Austin, Texas, USA
Posts: 1,799

Bikes: Trek 520, Lightfoot Ranger, Trek 4500

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 262 Post(s)
Liked 54 Times in 45 Posts
Originally Posted by KC8QVO View Post
Of the tents that you can put in your category of a more robust tent - why do you say the Tarptent models closest to that still don't cut the mustard?

Reason I ask, is that, to me, if you add a solid interior the tents seem like regular tents to me.
Actually, I don't have an issue with the more robust tarptent - as a tent. They look robust enough to me. However, here is how I might make a comparison with Tarptent Double Rainbow vs. REI Halfdome2 vs REI Quarterdome 2:

Double Rainbow - https://www.tarptent.com/product/dou...nbow/#tab-id-2
weight = 40.8 oz (2.5 lbs)
floor = 88"x50"
height = 40"
cost = $299
freestanding --> requires extra trekking poles ( ~15 oz ), I wouldn't normally bring on a bike trip.

Halfdome - https://www.rei.com/product/128692/r...me-2-plus-tent
weight = 82 oz (5+ lbs)
floor = 88x52"
height = 38"
cost = ~$200 (no longer available)
freestanding

Quarterdome sl2 - https://www.rei.com/product/147863/r...dome-sl-2-tent
weight = 40oz (2.5 lbs)
floor = 88x52"
height = 42"
cost = ~$349
semi-freestanding

MSR Hubba Hubba - https://www.rei.com/product/141933/m...ubba-nx-2-tent
weight = 56oz (3.5 lbs)
floor = 84"x50"
height = 39"
cost = ~$450
freestanding

What I liked best were the previous versions of the Quarterdome (https://www.rei.com/product/827785/r...r-dome-t2-tent) that were truly freestanding and around 4 lbs trail weight and not too expensive. Prior to my next expedition, I'll look for something similar. If I'm cycling, then there isn't much advantage to using Trekking poles as part of the tent. The newer Quarterdome SL2 that I picked up and used last week is OK, though I'd probably still go for something truly freestanding.

I spent a full day of rain inside the Quarterdome2 while I waited for the normally gravel (now mud) road across Siberia to clear up - so I like having a full tent for that type of situation. However, if I am not on a longer term expedition, then a lighter alternative can also work.
mev is offline  
Old 10-12-20, 04:02 PM
  #11  
Leebo
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: North of Boston
Posts: 5,719

Bikes: Kona Dawg, Surly 1x1, Karate Monkey, Rockhopper, Crosscheck , Burley Runabout,

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 853 Post(s)
Liked 109 Times in 64 Posts
My Big Agnes HV1 bikepacking tent weighs 2.5 lbs. waterproof, mesh interior. Long enough for me at 6'4 and can sit up in it. Advantage of a tarp tent is what? And mine has short poles that fold.
Leebo is offline  
Old 10-12-20, 05:00 PM
  #12  
Tourist in MSN
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 7,358

Bikes: 1961 Ideor, 1994 Bridgestone MB-6, 2006 Airnimal Joey, 2009 Thorn Sherpa, 2013 Thorn Nomad, 2015 VO Pass Hunter, 2017 Lynskey Backroad, 2017 Raleigh Gran Prix, Perfekt 3 Speed -age unknown, 1980s Bianchi Mixte on a trainer. Others are now gone.

Mentioned: 34 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1924 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 308 Times in 261 Posts
One of those Tarptents you linked to uses trekking poles to save weight for the backpacker.

I have a couple tents that were designed for trekking poles, one of those tents (Big Agnes Scout Plus) I have used for three summers for a variety of trips including bike touring, I cut tent poles to the correct length with sections that are short enough to fold and put in a pannier.

The only time I had trouble setting up that tent was in a state park in Florida Keys, there were roofed wood platforms in the mangrove, and that tent required stakes. You can't pound in stakes on a wood deck. i was jamming twigs in between the boards to tie off my lines.

Some companies sell optional poles if you do not want to use trekking poles, but I made my own.

Tourist in MSN is offline  
Old 10-12-20, 09:11 PM
  #13  
KC8QVO
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 880

Bikes: Surly Disk Trucker, 2014 w/Brooks Flyer Special saddle, Tubus racks - Duo front/Logo Evo rear, 2019 Dahon Mariner D8, Both bikes share Ortlieb Packer Plus series panniers, Garmin Edge 1000

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 279 Post(s)
Liked 55 Times in 48 Posts
Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN View Post
One of those Tarptents you linked to uses trekking poles to save weight for the backpacker.

Some companies sell optional poles if you do not want to use trekking poles, but I made my own.
You are correct. Tarptent sells them in various lengths for $16/ea.

https://www.tarptent.com/product/vertical-support-pole/

For what its worth - those poles could be used with any tent that is made for trekking poles, provided the length chosen is the right length for the tent you have.

I do have trekking poles for backpacking. If I had a model tent that required them and used it biking then the optional poles (linked above) would be nice to have - surely lighter and less bulk than my trekking poles.
KC8QVO is offline  
Old 10-13-20, 06:41 AM
  #14  
djb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Montreal Canada
Posts: 10,790
Mentioned: 30 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1813 Post(s)
Liked 367 Times in 315 Posts
As I value freestanding tents , I'd be less keen on a tarptent, and would accept the extra weight. Here in Canada you're looking at the $350-400 cad. range minimum for top brand 1 person or 2 person tents.
My older 2p MSR bubba is a good 4.5lbs but newer ones are lighter, as well as much lighter Big Agnes models, other msr models and the 1p tents.
I've hummed and hawed about getting a lighter tent but just keep using the 2p and 3p tents we have, really more of a money issue and the fact that we have them and they don't get used that much.

but back to your question, I still would prefer a self standing tent for overall use, but realize there's a weight penalty , although you can spend $ 6,7,800 on supper light self standing tents by known brands.

Last edited by djb; 10-13-20 at 06:49 AM.
djb is offline  
Likes For djb:
Old 10-13-20, 06:56 AM
  #15  
KC8QVO
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 880

Bikes: Surly Disk Trucker, 2014 w/Brooks Flyer Special saddle, Tubus racks - Duo front/Logo Evo rear, 2019 Dahon Mariner D8, Both bikes share Ortlieb Packer Plus series panniers, Garmin Edge 1000

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 279 Post(s)
Liked 55 Times in 48 Posts
One of my riding buddies made the comment, regarding free-standing tents, that the ones he has he can pick up and move to flatter ground if need-be.

I am not overly concerned with the flat ground issue - I am pretty good about finding OK spots. However, I am more concerned with the ability to get stakes in the ground - or not. If there is a spot to pitch but is a wood deck, like Tourist in MSN posted about - that would be a difficult predicament without a free-standing tent.
KC8QVO is offline  
Old 10-13-20, 07:14 AM
  #16  
djb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Montreal Canada
Posts: 10,790
Mentioned: 30 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1813 Post(s)
Liked 367 Times in 315 Posts
Ive put my various freestanding tents up many times on hard surfaces, enough times anyway that this is why I have always used them.

Lets face it though, with a superduper light Tarptent, or even with a just a bit more weight but rather expensive Big Brand tent, you still are dealing with having to treat it carefully-- specifically on what you pitch it, sharp sticks, rocks, you name it, not to mention to not being a hack with the zippers, keeping dirt out of the zippers, and not being rough in general.
Some folks are just plain rough with things and wear stuff out and break stuff, others are not.

and we havent even touched on packed size, which Im sure the Tarptents win by a large margin--so for a bikepacking trip where space and weight is crucial, this would be a factor.
Just as the type of trip. If I were ever to do a trip like The Divide route or something with a long time spent on a trip and space and weight factors being an issue, then looking at one of these types of shelters could be attractive.

I do like how easy putting up my freestanding tents are, modern designs are great, nice when you are tired at the end of the day and bing bang boom its up. But I guess one gets used to putting any tent structure up, and a Tarptent probably wouldnt be different after doing it day after day.
djb is offline  
Old 10-13-20, 07:50 AM
  #17  
CargoDane
Banned.
 
Join Date: Oct 2020
Posts: 839

Bikes: Bullitt Milk Plus, Dahon Smooth Hound, Ti Omnium Cargo w/Rohloff

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 325 Post(s)
Liked 296 Times in 183 Posts
Tents from Tarptent are "modern designs". They are not tarps. They are tents. You can choose to use (or buy) them with or without an inner. And they are as quick to set up as other modern tents.

Go to tarptent.com/tents to see (can't post URLs yet).
CargoDane is offline  
Old 10-13-20, 08:52 AM
  #18  
Tourist in MSN
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 7,358

Bikes: 1961 Ideor, 1994 Bridgestone MB-6, 2006 Airnimal Joey, 2009 Thorn Sherpa, 2013 Thorn Nomad, 2015 VO Pass Hunter, 2017 Lynskey Backroad, 2017 Raleigh Gran Prix, Perfekt 3 Speed -age unknown, 1980s Bianchi Mixte on a trainer. Others are now gone.

Mentioned: 34 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1924 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 308 Times in 261 Posts
Originally Posted by KC8QVO View Post
You are correct. Tarptent sells them in various lengths for $16/ea.

I do have trekking poles for backpacking. If I had a model tent that required them and used it biking then the optional poles (linked above) would be nice to have - surely lighter and less bulk than my trekking poles.

I also have trekking poles, but they are much longer than would fit in my panniers. If I travel light and do not have a bag on top of the rear rack, I want everything to fit in the panniers.

Initially I cut some poles from an old A frame tent that I need to dispose of some day, has not been used since the 80s. But those poles were longer than I wanted when folded.

Later I bought a new long 11mm diameter pole and some trekking pole rubber feet, that way I could cut my pole sections to the length I needed to fold them and fit in the panniers. The rubber feet are for both ends. The long pole I bought was long enough to provide several shorter poles.

I also backpack with one pole, not two, thus if I use that tent backpacking, I still need to add a pole.

Originally Posted by KC8QVO View Post
One of my riding buddies made the comment, regarding free-standing tents, that the ones he has he can pick up and move to flatter ground if need-be.
....
I camped for decades with an old friend that had a large self supporting tent. We often pitched the tent and then did a final check on location by holding up one side and looking for twigs, rocks, etc., before we staked it out.

We also always carried a 10 X 10 tarp we would put up if it was raining, we could hang out under the tarp, cook on a stove under the tarp, store our gear under it, etc. And if it was raining in the morning we often carried the tent over to and under the tarp so that we could take down the tent out of the rain. The tent fly was of course soaked, but that kept the tent body drier when we folded up the tent. There were a few times in rain when we set up the tent under the tarp and then carried it to where we wanted it, that also kept the inside of the tent drier.
Tourist in MSN is offline  
Likes For Tourist in MSN:
Old 10-13-20, 09:06 AM
  #19  
KC8QVO
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 880

Bikes: Surly Disk Trucker, 2014 w/Brooks Flyer Special saddle, Tubus racks - Duo front/Logo Evo rear, 2019 Dahon Mariner D8, Both bikes share Ortlieb Packer Plus series panniers, Garmin Edge 1000

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 279 Post(s)
Liked 55 Times in 48 Posts
Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN View Post
We also always carried a 10 X 10 tarp we would put up if it was raining, we could hang out under the tarp, cook on a stove under the tarp, store our gear under it, etc. And if it was raining in the morning we often carried the tent over to and under the tarp so that we could take down the tent out of the rain. The tent fly was of course soaked, but that kept the tent body drier when we folded up the tent. There were a few times in rain when we set up the tent under the tarp and then carried it to where we wanted it, that also kept the inside of the tent drier.
That is a good point.

On my coming trek I will have both the tent and hammock. I think the hammock tarp is pretty close to 10x10. I've done the "group shelter" thing with it on backpacking trips - hang the tarp minus the hammock and several of us could get under the tarp for meals while it was raining. Good piece of gear to have. The only thing I wish my hammock tarp had set up differently is more tie-outs. It only has them in the middle on one side and 4 corners. That makes it hard to make it in to a lean-to with overhang as there is no in-between tie-outs. So its either a 1/2 length bend or no overhang and just a full length panel.
KC8QVO is offline  
Old 10-13-20, 09:38 AM
  #20  
mev
bicycle tourist
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Austin, Texas, USA
Posts: 1,799

Bikes: Trek 520, Lightfoot Ranger, Trek 4500

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 262 Post(s)
Liked 54 Times in 45 Posts
Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN View Post
We also always carried a 10 X 10 tarp we would put up if it was raining, we could hang out under the tarp, cook on a stove under the tarp, store our gear under it, etc.
As mentioned I vary between two setups: a minimum camping setup and a regular camping setup.

My minimum camping setup is this: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...e?ie=UTF8&th=1
On the PRO side, it serves as either tube tent or unzips to be a tarp. It cost me ~$25, is less than two pounds and fits inside my pannier.
On the CON side, it doesn't protect me from bugs and requires trees or something else if I want to string it up.

So I take along my minimal camping setup under several circumstances such as (a) typically shorter trips e.g. weekends or weeks and not months (b) as a backup solution when I expect to motel most of the time, but want flexibility (c) when I know more about bugs and weather, either because it is short-term and I can see weather forecasts or if I am in drier areas where I don't expect bugs. Below is an example where the town I stopped at had a motel, but it was full so I camped in their backyard.

In my full camping setup, I've mostly done with vestibule on a tent as well as a footprint. I haven't necessarily carried my tube tent as well. As far as freestanding situations go, those are the minority and I can sometimes work around it. However, I have also found situations where (a) I camped on concrete/asphalt (b) I set up my tent as a bug shelter inside - even on a mattress if it was questionable enough (c) it was convenient to not have to worry about getting stakes into the ground.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg
IMGP6779.JPG (417.8 KB, 255 views)
mev is offline  
Old 10-13-20, 12:42 PM
  #21  
djb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Montreal Canada
Posts: 10,790
Mentioned: 30 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1813 Post(s)
Liked 367 Times in 315 Posts
Originally Posted by CargoDane View Post
Tents from Tarptent are "modern designs". They are not tarps. They are tents. You can choose to use (or buy) them with or without an inner. And they are as quick to set up as other modern tents.

Go to tarptent.com/tents to see (can't post URLs yet).
Yes, I'm aware of them. Even considered one at one point. I didnt word things well, I just meant that any modern tent design is fast to put up.
Tarptents are most likely a bit more fragile than other tents that weigh more, given the weight of the materials, and then there still is the non free standing thing, which may or may not be a concern for each person, but they are astoundingly light and smart designs.
djb is offline  
Likes For djb:
Old 10-13-20, 01:24 PM
  #22  
Doug64
Senior Member
 
Doug64's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Oregon
Posts: 5,905
Mentioned: 29 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 932 Post(s)
Liked 298 Times in 172 Posts
Like mev, we fit the tent we use to the destination, season, and weather.

Try this with a non-freestanding tent-- my wife doing a little house cleaning before packing.


This is the packed size of that 2- person, 3-season tent (blue bag) compared to a water bottle.


My total sleep/shelter system including tent, rainfly, 6' x 8' tarp/ground cloth, 20 degree sleeping bag, Thermarest Pro 4 pad, compressible pillow and Ortlieb Rack Pack, weigh a little over 10 pounds.


If we use this semi-freestanding 2- person light weight tent, it reduces the weight by 2 lbs. Note that the tent stands up fairly well with no stakes.


Most tent's rainflies need to be staked out to be effective.

Last edited by Doug64; 10-13-20 at 01:40 PM.
Doug64 is offline  
Likes For Doug64:
Old 10-13-20, 02:23 PM
  #23  
djb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Montreal Canada
Posts: 10,790
Mentioned: 30 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1813 Post(s)
Liked 367 Times in 315 Posts
good point on how important it is to stake out a rainfly for it to work properly, so yes clearly stakes are an important part of any well working tent.

its those situations putting up the tent without the fly, either inside a structure, on wood or cement, or even on a bed, where self standing tents are handy.

my older hubba hubba was just before they put in those little ventilation openings at each end of the fly to avoid condensation (which really works great, have them on our 3 man tent) and I've attached new additional guidelines to the fly to help keep the fly away from the inner mesh , and to help with ventilation. It works, but now I need four more stakes to bring with me.....
djb is offline  
Old 10-13-20, 07:44 PM
  #24  
Twang -O- Doom
Member
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 30

Bikes: Cadex CFM-1

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Liked 8 Times in 7 Posts
Originally Posted by djb View Post
Y
Tarptents are most likely a bit more fragile than other tents that weigh more, given the weight of the materials, and then there still is the non free standing thing, which may or may not be a concern for each person, but they are astoundingly light and smart designs.
Actually Tarptents tend to be much stronger than other lightweight freestanding tents. The silnylon versions use a 30 denier fabric, while the light weight versions of many of the freestanding tent manufactures like Big Agnes, MSR, Nemo, etc.. might be using 20d or even thinner material in some cases. So thin in fact they started the idea trend of selling/recommending using ground sheets so as not to puncture the floor.

I have a Protrail, and it's faster to set up than any of the free standing tents I have used..

Oh many folks don't like the color of the Tarptents, but i have found the newer versions to be a bit greener than the light grey of the older versions, and they also seem to be to reflect the background a bit and look darker in a darker area. See back yard photo attached.

One thing to know about Tarptents is they are not factory seam sealed, You can do it yourself, or pay an extra 30 bucks for them to do it for you. (it's a manual process, but not hard to do)



Twang -O- Doom is offline  
Old 10-13-20, 08:11 PM
  #25  
djb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Montreal Canada
Posts: 10,790
Mentioned: 30 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1813 Post(s)
Liked 367 Times in 315 Posts
Originally Posted by Twang -O- Doom View Post
Actually Tarptents tend to be much stronger than other lightweight freestanding tents. The silnylon versions use a 30 denier fabric, while the light weight versions of many of the freestanding tent manufactures like Big Agnes, MSR, Nemo, etc.. might be using 20d or even thinner material in some cases. So thin in fact they started the idea trend of selling/recommending using ground sheets so as not to puncture the floor.

I have a Protrail, and it's faster to set up than any of the free standing tents I have used..

Oh many folks don't like the color of the Tarptents, but i have found the newer versions to be a bit greener than the light grey of the older versions, and they also seem to be to reflect the background a bit and look darker in a darker area. See back yard photo attached.

One thing to know about Tarptents is they are not factory seam sealed, You can do it yourself, or pay an extra 30 bucks for them to do it for you. (it's a manual process, but not hard to do)
interesting about fabric weight. I need to learn more about this, I don't recall all the details.
Odd that they don't seam seal them. Ive been seamsealing tents for ages.
djb is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.