Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Touring
Reload this Page >

Do you use powdered nutrition mix?

Notices
Touring Have a dream to ride a bike across your state, across the country, or around the world? Self-contained or fully supported? Trade ideas, adventures, and more in our bicycle touring forum.

Do you use powdered nutrition mix?

Old 12-10-20, 02:28 PM
  #1  
Jno
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Posts: 109
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 92 Post(s)
Liked 11 Times in 9 Posts
Do you use powdered nutrition mix?

Do people who tour (tourists?) use powdered nutrition in their water bottles, or do you grab food as opportunities arise because nutritional supplement is not worth the weight penalty?
Jno is offline  
Old 12-10-20, 02:42 PM
  #2  
Steve0000
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: New Zealand
Posts: 225

Bikes: LHT disc, Cannondale CAAD8, Cannondale Super 6, Avanti Agressor MTB

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 18 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 6 Times in 5 Posts
Used to when I first started, never do now. Water is fine for me and if I need energy, I eat a muesli bar.
My partner still uses them but I think a lot of it is psychological.
Less weight to carry.
Steve0000 is offline  
Old 12-10-20, 03:07 PM
  #3  
Happy Feet
Senior Member
 
Happy Feet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Left Coast, Canada
Posts: 5,093
Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2216 Post(s)
Liked 1,273 Times in 687 Posts
Not me. The whey powder shakers get clumpy and it takes extra water to wash them clean, too much hassle and nutrition is met from normal food.
The only thing I buy on the road in the summer is a gatorade type drink daily (one only) as my preventative electrolyte replacement strategy. There are other electrolyte forms such as powders or tablets but I find those drinks pretty easy to find on route.
Happy Feet is offline  
Old 12-10-20, 10:22 PM
  #4  
veganbikes
Clark W. Griswold
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: ,location, location
Posts: 8,946

Bikes: Foundry Chilkoot Ti W/Ultegra Di2, Salsa Timberjack Ti, Cinelli Mash Work RandoCross Fun Time Machine, 1x9 XT Parts Hybrid, Co-Motion Cascadia, Specialized Langster, Phil Wood Apple VeloXS Frame (w/DA 7400), Cilo Road Frame, Proteus frame, Ti 26 MTB

Mentioned: 38 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2503 Post(s)
Liked 1,548 Times in 1,033 Posts
I use Nuun and Camelbak Elixir tablets (and in the past used CocoHydro) because they are quite important but I don't use like protein powders or anything like that.

Water is only part of the equation, if you are just drinking water you are missing out on electrolytes and such that you need. Plus after a time water can become unpalatable. A lot of people don't get it but when you hit that wall you will know. I remember my first tour I just couldn't do it and I felt like crap until we ate dinner and one of our friends had met us to bring food and drinks that weren't water.
veganbikes is offline  
Likes For veganbikes:
Old 12-10-20, 11:00 PM
  #5  
Carbonfiberboy 
just another gosling
 
Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Everett, WA
Posts: 17,863

Bikes: CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004

Mentioned: 106 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3112 Post(s)
Liked 1,025 Times in 777 Posts
Bike touring, we carry as little with us as we can, therefore no powdered protein, drink mixes, etc. We do bring along a bottle of Endurolytes. We don't buy bottled sports drinks, either. Water's fine. In the Czech Republic and Germany, I'd have a half liter of beer with lunch, In Czechia, beer was cheaper than water. In the US, we just drink water.

Backpacking though, we bring that sort of stuff, since we have to carry it no matter what it is and powdered stuff is at least dry, so per pound that's as light as it gets. It's all just calories in and out when we're backpacking. But even backpacking, we only drink plain water on the trail.
__________________
Results matter
Carbonfiberboy is offline  
Old 12-11-20, 04:40 AM
  #6  
indyfabz
Senior Member
 
indyfabz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 31,815
Mentioned: 201 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 14186 Post(s)
Liked 7,340 Times in 3,699 Posts
Occasionally. If I plan a trip that has a long and/or hard day with few or no services Iíll bring a single serve packet of Hammer Perpetuem and start out with it in one of my bottles. Iím not a big user of products like that because I prefer regular food, but the stuff actually works for me.
indyfabz is offline  
Old 12-11-20, 07:37 AM
  #7  
Tourist in MSN
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 8,659

Bikes: 1961 Ideor, 1966 Perfekt 3 Speed AB Hub, 1994 Bridgestone MB-6, 2006 Airnimal Joey, 2009 Thorn Sherpa, 2013 Thorn Nomad MkII, 2015 VO Pass Hunter, 2017 Lynskey Backroad, 2017 Raleigh Gran Prix, 1980s Bianchi Mixte on a trainer. Others are now gone.

Mentioned: 38 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2434 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 654 Times in 534 Posts
Originally Posted by Jno View Post
Do people who tour (tourists?) use powdered nutrition in their water bottles...
Nope.

Instead I suggest something like this:



Or this:




But you can expect to pedal a bit slowly for a couple hours after eating the above.

I often try to buy some granola bars or something like that as a backup plan for long days on the bike where you need the calories but do not have lunch fixings or conveniently located restaurants.

I think you are thinking a bit like a road biker here, not so much like someone on a long tour. A road bike rider is more likely to be riding at a higher wattage level for shorter period of time. Bike touring, often lower wattage but longer hours. Read this. Think about it. Read it again in a week or two.
https://www.roadbikerider.com/energy...e-intensities/

Bike touring you are relying much more on fats to fuel your ride than a road bike rider. Your hourly carb consumption can be much lower on a bike tour.

Plus you need some protein at end of day to aid muscle recovery. Most athletic trainers will tell you that you should have some protein within 30 to 45 minutes after strenuous exercise for better muscle recovery. I often try to have a protein bar soon after the end of a long day on the bike, thus often try to keep some in my pack. I often forget to eat them, but it is on my list of things I need to remember to do.

And, bike tourists can suffer electrolyte loss just like a road bike rider, so it can be a good idea to have some salty foods in your pack in case you start to bonk.

And occasionally some of this too:


Tourist in MSN is online now  
Old 12-11-20, 07:52 AM
  #8  
Tourist in MSN
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 8,659

Bikes: 1961 Ideor, 1966 Perfekt 3 Speed AB Hub, 1994 Bridgestone MB-6, 2006 Airnimal Joey, 2009 Thorn Sherpa, 2013 Thorn Nomad MkII, 2015 VO Pass Hunter, 2017 Lynskey Backroad, 2017 Raleigh Gran Prix, 1980s Bianchi Mixte on a trainer. Others are now gone.

Mentioned: 38 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2434 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 654 Times in 534 Posts
Speaking of water, I usually try to carry up to three liters of water on my bike. I do not recall if Smartwater one liter sized bottles are sold in Canada, I do recall seeing Life Water sold in one liter sizes. Those bottles fit well in water bottle cages. But the smaller sizes from those brands do not. The one liter size bottles do not have flip top lids, I use flip top lids from smaller bottles.

Many bikes can't take that large a bottle in the cage under the downtube, often smaller bottles needed down there. If your bike can fit that large a bottle in that cage, a velcro strap or something like it to keep it in the cage can keep it from falling out, the cages are not designed for that tall a bottle.



In the photo, the upper two bottles are labeled Life WTR. I bought those in USA. But when I was in Canada I saw the same brand labeled as Life Water in stores.

The bottles are intended to be disposable, but I bring empty ones from home when I go somewhere for a bike trip, I reuse them.
Tourist in MSN is online now  
Old 12-11-20, 08:15 AM
  #9  
andrewclaus
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Golden, CO and Tucson, AZ
Posts: 2,259

Bikes: 2016 Fuji Tread, 1983 Trek 520

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 487 Post(s)
Liked 255 Times in 183 Posts
I don't either. I keep handy a bag of raisins and a bag of nuts for snacks, and eat something that actually occurs in nature every time I stop for a break.

Many of the supplements use HFCS as a major ingredient. I just stay away from that stuff. And if you're not careful in warm weather, the inside of your water bottle starts looking like an art project.
andrewclaus is offline  
Old 12-11-20, 08:46 AM
  #10  
djb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Montreal Canada
Posts: 11,876
Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2205 Post(s)
Liked 576 Times in 485 Posts
Originally Posted by andrewclaus View Post
And if you're not careful in warm weather, the inside of your water bottle starts looking like an art project.
this is very true. On day rides I used to regularly use gatoraid powder that you buy in large cans at the grocery store, and thats fine, but the few times that I took this powder on actual bike tours, I really had to be on top of washing out my bike bottles well or else you start to get growy stuff going on. I even took a little long dishwashing brush thing once on a trip to try to properly clean the bottom and sides of inside the bike bottles. Was a pain to have, so just now use my scrubby thing in my kitchen kit and a borrowed long wooden spoon or whatever once in a while and it does a good enough job--but importantly I try not to put sugary etc drinks in my bottles.

One exception to this however was in my Central America trip, where at times I could recognize that I really needed extra electrolytes, so I always had with me pharmacy bought little packets of electrolyte powder, very common in stores there because of diarrhea issues being so common with locals and for kids, so I when absolutely needed I would use ONE bike bottle for this and make sure I rinsed it out really well as soon as the day was done.

I also found that bananas are a great thing for hot days. Have become my go to snack, and I while Im not usually a salt person, I do listen to my body and buy and eat salty stuff , salted peanutes, chips etc easily found in corner stores. Mexico in particular has the best small salted and (HOOOT) pepper powdered peanut packages, they were a staple for me also.
So yes, its possible with regular store bought stuff to help keep things in control, but be aware, a cross canada trip will entail lots of areas where you'll have mucho distances between stores, and a lot of times only gas stations. We drove across Canada once and I certainly remember noticing this and realizing that on bike you'd really want to have snacks with you a lot.
Don't worry, you'll figure out next summer how your fueling and drinking needs are with lots of training rides and some short test tours. Get it sorted out beforehand and you'll feel a lot more confident about if you and your friends do this Canada trip.
And also dont worry, after a week on the road, you figure stuff out.
djb is offline  
Old 12-11-20, 08:54 AM
  #11  
djb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Montreal Canada
Posts: 11,876
Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2205 Post(s)
Liked 576 Times in 485 Posts
Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN View Post
I often try to buy some granola bars or something like that as a backup plan for long days on the bike where you need the calories but do not have lunch fixings or conveniently located restaurants.

I think you are thinking a bit like a road biker here, not so much like someone on a long tour. A road bike rider is more likely to be riding at a higher wattage level for shorter period of time. Bike touring, often lower wattage but longer hours. Read this. Think about it. Read it again in a week or two.
https://www.roadbikerider.com/energy...e-intensities/

Bike touring you are relying much more on fats to fuel your ride than a road bike rider. Your hourly carb consumption can be much lower on a bike tour.

And, bike tourists can suffer electrolyte loss just like a road bike rider, so it can be a good idea to have some salty foods in your pack in case you start to bonk.
all really good points
Jno, I didnt read the link, but he's right on about lower wattage but for longer hours.
You really just need to listen to your body and fuel when needed. For me, little snacks when my body says "now" is important and makes all the difference. Not going along with your riding partners and waiting 30mins or an hour to eat, have snacks nearby , easy ones, quick to have, and this is what makes all the difference for me. Plus a little snack break for a few mins gives your arse a break, nice too.

Listen, you'll probably take maybe too much food with you sometimes, but running out of snacks when no stores in sight for hours is a drag. I still remember on my very first bike trip totally bonking and not having any food, not fun and heck, this was in 1989....so the memory stayed clear. I've had similar situations a few times , but this is life, we learn and adjjust from mistakes, and figure out what works for us, as everyone is different for fueling or whatever.
djb is offline  
Old 12-11-20, 09:36 AM
  #12  
Tourist in MSN
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 8,659

Bikes: 1961 Ideor, 1966 Perfekt 3 Speed AB Hub, 1994 Bridgestone MB-6, 2006 Airnimal Joey, 2009 Thorn Sherpa, 2013 Thorn Nomad MkII, 2015 VO Pass Hunter, 2017 Lynskey Backroad, 2017 Raleigh Gran Prix, 1980s Bianchi Mixte on a trainer. Others are now gone.

Mentioned: 38 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2434 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 654 Times in 534 Posts
Originally Posted by djb View Post
... but be aware, a cross canada trip will entail lots of areas where you'll have mucho distances between stores, and a lot of times only gas stations. We drove across Canada once and I certainly remember noticing this and realizing that on bike you'd really want to have snacks with you a lot.
....
Really good point. I would not be surprised if in Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, if you at times went a long distance between small towns with good stores. And at times your route might bypass the good stores by significant distance. Trip logs from CrazyGuyOnABike might help on this.

When a friend and I did the Pacific Coast, we brought about a day of freeze dried as a backup plan for food. We never ate it and brought it home. It stayed in the bottom of a pannier and just having that as a contingency meant that we never obsessed about where the next grocery store was. And not having to worry about the location of your next grocery store stop can reduce some stress.

When I did my Maritimes trip, my research indicated that the North End of Cape Breton Island can be a food desert. So, before I left home I tried to find the grocery stores in the area and put them into my GPS. I am not suggesting that you do this for a distance of three provinces, but it would be a good idea when you are riding to know how far in time it is to the next major community that is likely to have grocery stores so each time you shop, you know how many days of food you need to buy.

In the photo, I think this was the first grocery store I saw for about five days on North Cap Breton Island, it was about a km or two off my route but I knew it was there because I had put it in my GPS when still at home.

Tourist in MSN is online now  
Likes For Tourist in MSN:
Old 12-11-20, 10:30 AM
  #13  
Happy Feet
Senior Member
 
Happy Feet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Left Coast, Canada
Posts: 5,093
Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2216 Post(s)
Liked 1,273 Times in 687 Posts
For western Canada, especially the prairies, I find google maps to be useful. I look at each days expected route (approx. 100km's for me) and see which towns are there. Then I zoom in and use street view to look at the store front. One thing I found was that many smaller prairie towns are now hamlets with or without basic services. There's a name on the map but really only a collection of houses. You should expect 50 km jumps between a garage or store and plan to hit them during business hours and maybe not on Sunday. The larger towns have normal services.

As a rule of thumb I keep a one day reserve of food just in case I missed a store. Only one though, it's not a wilderness

Last edited by Happy Feet; 12-11-20 at 10:36 AM.
Happy Feet is offline  
Old 12-11-20, 12:20 PM
  #14  
axolotl
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 1,889
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 219 Post(s)
Liked 52 Times in 39 Posts
Originally Posted by Jno View Post
Do people who tour (tourists?) use powdered nutrition in their water bottles, or do you grab food as opportunities arise because nutritional supplement is not worth the weight penalty?
Your question makes the assumption that touring cyclists need "powdered nutrition", and that if we don't use it, it's because of its weight. I don't use "powdered nutrition" because IMO it's completely unnecessary, regardless of whether I'm touring.
axolotl is offline  
Old 12-17-20, 11:18 PM
  #15  
MarcusT
Senior Member
 
MarcusT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: NE Italy
Posts: 1,144
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 516 Post(s)
Liked 271 Times in 163 Posts
Real food is my touring diet. With the occasional cereal bar on the fly
MarcusT is offline  
Old 12-28-20, 11:43 PM
  #16  
Machka 
In Real Life
 
Machka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Down under down under
Posts: 52,071

Bikes: Lots

Mentioned: 140 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3183 Post(s)
Liked 479 Times in 280 Posts
Originally Posted by Jno View Post
Do people who tour (tourists?) use powdered nutrition in their water bottles, or do you grab food as opportunities arise because nutritional supplement is not worth the weight penalty?
I use food ... not powdered nutrition ... for touring. In fact, food is part of the joy of touring.

If I were doing a century ride or a randonnee, I might go with the powdered nutrition, but I've even gone off using it in those situations.
Machka is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.