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Microshift BS-M10 Barcons

Old 12-11-20, 03:22 AM
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Germany_chris
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Microshift BS-M10 Barcons

The day before yesterday I made the switch to 10sp with a new XT rear derailleur and cassette thinking that my Dia-Compe Ene would shift the full range of the cassette but they didn't. I emailed Velo Orange and asked them if it was a problem with my shifters or if I was being an idiot and they let me know that the shifters would not pull 10sp mountain bike. In my google searching for a set of shifters that would pull 10sp mountain there seemed to be only one the Microshift BS-M10 so I ordered a set. The internet and pro reviewers seem either hot or cold on Microshift, what does the bike forums touring section know about or think about Microshift barcons?
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Old 12-11-20, 06:06 AM
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I've got the BS-M11 (I think same as yours with a different index plate or whatever they call it) paired up with SLX 11 speed and think it's great. I expect to use microshift bar ends should I build up any other bikes with compatible derailleurs in future.
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Old 12-11-20, 09:04 AM
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FWIW, REI is using these shifters on the ADV 1.1. I like bar-end shifters a lot, and I would really like to try them to see how they compare to the 9-speed BS77 Dura Ace shifters I have now.
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Old 12-11-20, 01:57 PM
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I think these are the same ones that are on the Konacado, which have worked very well for me so far. The front is a "micro-index" friction. It feels like exactly that, which results in a light, snappy shift. I'm not really sure how that compares in durability to the classic Shimano friction. The rear Microshift lever is supposed to become friction after you adjust it with a #4 allen wrench. I'll let you test that out yourself.
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Old 12-11-20, 02:21 PM
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I have MicroShift BS-T09 bar ends on a tandem we tour on, the rear is indexed for 9-speed but I use it in friction mode with no issues. The change between friction and index is simple and easy to do with a 4mm hex. I've had the expander nut come loose on a ride one time over 2 years but it was a quick fix with a multitool. The overall fit and finish of them is way nicer than expected.

IIRC some of the bar end models don't have the ability to be switched from index to friction, but I think the M10 does have that capability so that should be fine.

I've also used a set of their Brifters when working on an older 3x8 bike, those were less attractive but fully functional and sturdy.

Basically just saying that MicroShift would be my choice when you're unpretentious and want to get the job done, and when it comes to something like a friction shifter at least it wouldn't be hard to repair if you found it wanting in the wilderness.
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Old 12-11-20, 02:48 PM
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I have Shimano DA 9sp bar ends on a bike and for 4 years used Microshift 11sp bar ends on my gravel bike.

The Microshift work great- they are precise, easy to set up, and well finished.
...its a bar end shifter, if it indexes properly its plenty good for me.
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Old 12-11-20, 02:55 PM
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I've had both the 9 speed and 10 speed Microshift bar end shifters. They're fine. Simple and rugged. They're stock components on many touring bikes.
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Old 12-11-20, 04:17 PM
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A friend of mine was getting ready for Northern Tier in 2017. His brifters died on his bike, he was in a hurry to get is bike working, nine speed system. He knew that I had bar ends on two touring bikes, he asked me. I suggested Shimano bar ends, he tried one of my bikes for about 10 miles to test them out. Decided to get bar ends. He hired someone to replace his shfters, that person installed Microshift instead of Shimano. They worked fine for Northern Tier. Later, they worked for Pacific Coast from Canada to Mexico. He still has them on his touring bike.

I have never used them myself, I can only relay the experience of a friend of mine.
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Old 12-12-20, 07:28 AM
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I have the above referenced REI ADV1.1 with Microshift bar end shifters and they have been flawless for near 8k miles this year. I spend almost all my time on the hoods and was worried about bar ends but after a few days it was second nature just like transitioning to clipless pedals from flats was.
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Old 12-12-20, 09:49 AM
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Originally Posted by mbusky View Post
I have the above referenced REI ADV1.1 with Microshift bar end shifters and they have been flawless for near 8k miles this year. I spend almost all my time on the hoods and was worried about bar ends but after a few days it was second nature just like transitioning to clipless pedals from flats was.
My problem is I quickly adjust to bar ends (which I also had on a bike back in the 90s) and keep reaching for them to shift when I'm on a bike with brifters.
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Old 12-12-20, 06:52 PM
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Originally Posted by Marylander View Post
My problem is I quickly adjust to bar ends (which I also had on a bike back in the 90s) and keep reaching for them to shift when I'm on a bike with brifters.
hey, once in a blue moon my hand reaches down to change non existent dt shifters, which makes me chuckle.
So you're not the only one. My excuse is that I've kept my dt touring bike and use it as my indoor trainer bike, so I actually still do shift dt, but only sometimes in the winter.
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Old 12-13-20, 01:22 AM
  #12  
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Have read this entire short thread and have things to add.

First I have a Microshift 11 speed barcon on a bike which for at least a dozen years had 9 speed Ultegra barcons on it and a triple crankset.

Last year I switched it to a 1x drivetrain. I lost a lot of range, but it's okay for my needs. Not part of the discussion.

I agree with the general approval of Microshift I read here. I also installed a Microsoft XCD 11 speed rear derailleur.

It's only been a year, so long term, who knows.

Compared to Shimano they feel very different. When I first used the Microshift bar con I was surprised by how far upwards the lever travelled to get into the low gears on the cassette. The detents or clicks are much crisper on the Microshift than Shimano.

On my old Shimano the plastic cover on the right lever fell off and was lost. At first I was sad, but actually I liked it and took the cover off the left paddle to match. I wonder how long the cover will stay on the Microsoft. Of course the shifter is in a place exposed to potential damage so one must be careful.

The main issue I have with my installation, which I did myself, is that the system didn't come with any barrel adjuster on the derailleur, which forced fine adjustment by the cable clamp. Not good.

I did consider putting an inline adjuster, and probably will when I have to change the housing or sooner if I end up getting the regular cable changes I expect.

The Microshift rear derailleur appears to have a suboptimal cable path that will cause wear.

Anyway the Shimano stuff was very good. I just got tired of the front derailleur.

Even though it was a triple, I hardly ever used the small ring.

But the worst thing was that the front gear cable on my bike was that as a cross bike the cable went around a pulley behind the seatstay for a bottom pull mech.

I commuted daily on it. The switching from middle to big ring at every stop light was for years a pleasure. It did however degrade and require many cable and housing replacements of which over the years became a chore I abhorred.

It's off topic, but I don't think my 11 speed.is as smooth as the old 3x9 was, however I like riding the bike still.
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Old 12-13-20, 06:38 AM
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Originally Posted by djb View Post
hey, once in a blue moon my hand reaches down to change non existent dt shifters, which makes me chuckle.
So you're not the only one. My excuse is that I've kept my dt touring bike and use it as my indoor trainer bike, so I actually still do shift dt, but only sometimes in the winter.
One derailleur touring bike, bar ends front and rear, front derailleur is low normal.
Other derailleur touring bike, bar ends front and rear, front derailleur is high normal.
Folding bike, bar ends front and rear, but the front is indexed, not friction.
Rohloff bike, twist grip on right side bar end.
Rando bike, friction downtube for front, brifter for rear.
Road bike, brifters front and rear.
Vintage bike I rarely use, when I do it is friction down tube front and rear.
Errand bike, flat bars, ratchet shifters front and rear.
I think that is it, ... for the ones that work.
Trainer bike, never shift it, it has an adjustable magnetic resistance lever I use instead. I do not know how to shift it.

It usually takes about 50 miles to remember how to shift, but the errand bike with flat bars is more obvious due to the bar shape. But, the high vs low normal front derailleurs are the most confusing.
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Old 12-13-20, 08:46 AM
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ahh, so thaaaat explains your state of general confusion ;-)
fun list though

ya, we can adapt fairly quickly, same with driving different vehicles, automatic, standard, how they brake and turn, car, truck, motorcycle etc. I think some people are just better at adapting than others, or it comes more easily.
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Old 12-13-20, 09:11 AM
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The fun part is when you are a riding zombie and fish around for imaginary gears that don't exist which causes you to consciously surface from your reverie. I single speed a lot, and it happens sometimes when I'm complete immersed in riding that I forget I'm on a single speed and seek a lower or higher gear.

We have a tandem that uses a friction shifter for the rear drum drag brake. The bar con is at the end of the right drop. I must confess that I've pulled up on it at the worst time looking for a lower gear. The result is never an enhancement.
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Old 12-13-20, 09:33 AM
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Originally Posted by Sorcerer View Post
We have a tandem that uses a friction shifter for the rear drum drag brake. The bar con is at the end of the right drop. I must confess that I've pulled up on it at the worst time looking for a lower gear. The result is never an enhancement.
I've done similar but in a car. Taking my Mom, in her car, on a long drive I took a highway exit and slammed on the brakes hard. I thought I was pushing in the clutch! That's what the left pedal is supposed to be!

I've got no trouble switching between motorcycles and bicycles at least.
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Old 12-13-20, 09:57 AM
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Originally Posted by djb View Post
ahh, so thaaaat explains your state of general confusion ;-)
fun list though

ya, we can adapt fairly quickly, same with driving different vehicles, automatic, standard, how they brake and turn, car, truck, motorcycle etc. I think some people are just better at adapting than others, or it comes more easily.
Many many decades ago, I decided to not ride any motorcyles other than my Triumphs, they had the shifter on the right side (where it belongs) and after few close calls on a bike with a shifter on the wrong side, I decided it was safest to stick with one system.
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Old 12-13-20, 07:13 PM
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Like Shimano or SRAM they make crap but they also make good quality stuff as well. I will say I like the company as they still make bar end and thumb shifters that the big S' has said not for us. Sorry those Tourney garbage are not what I am talking about. Microshift stuff seems to be good stuff as far as I can tell. I haven't mounted them but I have a set of the 11 speed mountain thumbies and just playing with them they seem really solid and quality.
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Old 12-13-20, 08:00 PM
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Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN View Post
Many many decades ago, I decided to not ride any motorcyles other than my Triumphs, they had the shifter on the right side (where it belongs) and after few close calls on a bike with a shifter on the wrong side, I decided it was safest to stick with one system.
ya, every time you mention that I just shudder of how weird that must be, so I get your take on it, although you have to admit that the setup of that era bikes that goes against every other bike since when Triumph abandoned that (early 70s no?) is a real dodo sort of thing.
I think Ive mentioned that for a long time, Grand Prix bikes have had the shifting pattern opposite of road bike stuff, ie slam down for an upshift, toe up for a downshift---the idea that the tenths saved on upshifts is more important.
I'm fairly certain that I've already mentioned that when I raced my two stroke Yamaha on track, I didnt really use the rear brake that much, just concentrated on the front, downshifting and blipping right. Mind you I was a backmarker all in all, so take that with a grain of salt. I think though that top 2 strokers of the time didnt use it much either. For me it just simplified things and allowed me to get my foot properly positioned going into right handers. It was a production bike after all so dragged the pegs pretty significantly, and my boots too if not careful).
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Old 12-14-20, 01:41 PM
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Well theyíre kinda ugly but they do seem to work. Iíll wrap both ends with twine when Iím sure they work which will hopefully make them more attractive


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Old 12-14-20, 06:50 PM
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chris, I don't think they are ugly at all, they look fine.
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Old 12-22-20, 04:55 PM
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I also have a CO-OP ADV1.1 (REI) with 10 speed Microshift bar end shifters, and I am completely satisfied with them. I also used Microshift 9 speed on my Trek 520 with complete satisfaction. Durable, precise and reliable.
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Old 12-23-20, 08:32 AM
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Originally Posted by KFC View Post
I also have a CO-OP ADV1.1 (REI) with 10 speed Microshift bar end shifters, and I am completely satisfied with them. I also used Microshift 9 speed on my Trek 520 with complete satisfaction. Durable, precise and reliable.
They've been good so far even on a day where I went to work and it was 40 and raining, the bike stayed outside and when I left it was in the mid 20's and snowing. I did get everything twined up and sealed up..

Unfortunately they're still ugly I may have to figure out how to make them silver
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