Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Touring
Reload this Page >

Handlebars

Notices
Touring Have a dream to ride a bike across your state, across the country, or around the world? Self-contained or fully supported? Trade ideas, adventures, and more in our bicycle touring forum.

Handlebars

Old 12-12-20, 09:02 AM
  #1  
Jno
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Posts: 104
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 90 Post(s)
Liked 11 Times in 9 Posts
Handlebars

I am looking at handlebars and have discounted a number for one reason or another but I hope the forum can offer its opinion about touring-usefulness of the Trek elite isozone sf ($130 Canadian). Among the things I don’t know:
  • 1. does a typical touring cockpit require rounded bars for affixing gear?
  • 2. Would gel inserts or other bar scultping aspects (flat/aero features) make bar surface off-puttingly irregular over time?
  • 3. Is drop depth a factor for some reason beyond my body’s comfort/familiarity etc
  • 4. Is there a narrowness of bars at which a loaded bike is likely too difficult to steer comfortably, or which is too narrow to host a “typical” array of stuff?
Thanks forum
Jno is offline  
Old 12-12-20, 10:01 AM
  #2  
Tourist in MSN
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 8,496

Bikes: 1961 Ideor, 1966 Perfekt 3 Speed AB Hub, 1994 Bridgestone MB-6, 2006 Airnimal Joey, 2009 Thorn Sherpa, 2013 Thorn Nomad MkII, 2015 VO Pass Hunter, 2017 Lynskey Backroad, 2017 Raleigh Gran Prix, 1980s Bianchi Mixte on a trainer. Others are now gone.

Mentioned: 38 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2355 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 598 Times in 493 Posts
I have photos from three touring bikes and a rando bike below that have the bars that I like.

The touring bikes start out with my heaviest duty bike that I consider an expedition bike, that bike has a Rohloff hub with a shifter on the right bar end using the Hubbub adapter. This bike has a 35 degree stem, I cut the steerer as short as I could get it because this is an S&S coupled bike and I pack this in a airline sized case, thus wanted as short a steerer tube as practical. Otherwise, I like to keep the steerer tube as long as practical in case I want to raise the bars up higher later. Also, a longer steerer tube could aid re-sale value if I go to sell the bike.






My longest day on the bike above was 14 hours. And I have had several 12 hour days on it. I have not found any reason to change any of what you see based on that experience.

***

Medium weight touring bike below. Bar end shifters and derailleurs. The bars on this bike are sort of flattened on the tops and around the bend between the tops and hoods. Nice, but not that important to me.



Most of my week long tours were done on the above bike.

***

Light touring bike below, I recently changed the bar tape, now red and black. Bar end shifters. In this photo I have an elastic on the front brake lever as a parking brake. On this bike I used an adjustable stem to get the handlebar bag lower.



Older photo below, this was before I changed the tape, I used to have white and black tape.



Two days ago I did a 7 hour exercise ride on the bike above, I wanted to get some exercise in before a snow storm hit. I built that bike up in 2017, I have only done one tour on it, five days long.

***

Rando bike below, rear shifter is a Campy brifter, front shifter is friction downtube, front brake is a Tektro brake lever that looks very much like the Campy. These bars have a little more reach than my others, the hoods are further forward by maybe 2 cm or maybe 2.5 cm. I needed a fairly short stem to compensate for that. This bike is comfortable enough that I have done 200k brevets with this but I am old enough that I doubt that I will ever want to do anything longer than 200k.






I am not answering a lot of the questions here because I previously did so in a private message.

If you have not figured this out yet, I like to use a handlebar bag instead of stuffing everything into jersy pockets.
Tourist in MSN is offline  
Old 12-12-20, 07:39 PM
  #3  
Happy Feet
Senior Member
 
Happy Feet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Left Coast, Canada
Posts: 5,029
Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2163 Post(s)
Liked 1,237 Times in 671 Posts
Originally Posted by Jno View Post
I am looking at handlebars and have discounted a number for one reason or another but I hope the forum can offer its opinion about touring-usefulness of the Trek elite isozone sf ($130 Canadian). Among the things I don’t know:
  • 1. does a typical touring cockpit require rounded bars for affixing gear?
  • 2. Would gel inserts or other bar scultping aspects (flat/aero features) make bar surface off-puttingly irregular over time?
  • 3. Is drop depth a factor for some reason beyond my body’s comfort/familiarity etc
  • 4. Is there a narrowness of bars at which a loaded bike is likely too difficult to steer comfortably, or which is too narrow to host a “typical” array of stuff?
Thanks forum
As with some other questions about touring set ups, there is no "tour specific" guideline for what you use. The guiding principle should be what you are comfortable riding over a long period of time; hours per day and days per week. With that in mind:

1. Doesn't matter. Most stuff today fixes onto rounded or ergonomically designed bars. Some people use an accessory bar for additional stuff.
2. Gel inserts are for comfort. Some like them, some don't. Others (myself included) use two sets of bar tape to double wrap the bars for extra comfort.
3. Drop depth is totally dependent on what you prefer. Deep or shallow. I prefer shallow drops because the nose of the saddle (which is adjusted optimally for riding in the hoods) digs into the perineum too much if I go into a deep drop posture.
4. Narrow bars used to be pretty well all you could get but now there are a variety of dropbar designs. Everyone has their preference but I would say comfort above all else - what feels good for you. Touring, especially across Canada , involves long hours going relatively straight so quick turning isn't a priority. I like a medium width bar with some flare because I think it allows for a more natural wrist position in the drops.

But... ask ten people what they think and you will probably get ten different answers.



Here is my cockpit. Double wrapped bars with Brooks Cambium rubber tape on top. The cork layer is seen on the bars below.



Here you can see the difference between flared and non flared bars.



Happy Feet is offline  
Likes For Happy Feet:
Old 12-12-20, 08:11 PM
  #4  
saddlesores
Senior Member
 
saddlesores's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Bangkok...and....Hainan
Posts: 3,307

Bikes: inferior steel....and....noodly aluminium

Mentioned: 22 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 878 Post(s)
Liked 173 Times in 120 Posts
Originally Posted by Jno View Post
....I hope the forum can offer its opinion about....

i'm afraid the comfort aspects of your specific body do not lend
themselves well to crowd-sourcing from anonymous strangers
on the intertubes.

these are the sorts of things you'll need to figure out on your own.
saddle time and experience are the only way to know what
works best for you.

good lucky.
saddlesores is offline  
Old 12-13-20, 03:03 AM
  #5  
Germany_chris
Senior Member
 
Germany_chris's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Southern Germany
Posts: 1,453
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 290 Post(s)
Liked 417 Times in 226 Posts
I use VO Nouveau Randonneur bars because of the reach and the fact that they stay 31.8 all the way to the transition, they look a little funny but they’re comfortable
Germany_chris is offline  
Old 12-13-20, 08:59 AM
  #6  
djb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Montreal Canada
Posts: 11,722
Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2146 Post(s)
Liked 545 Times in 464 Posts
guess all I can say given that Ive never ridden with "aero" shaped bars is that I can't see that its worth spending the money 130 on these. I do have a bike with those gel bits under the bartape and they seem to help, but on a touring bike with wider tires than a road bike, Im not sure gel stuff is necesaary, with the larger tires on a touring bike, and the dampening effect of a loaded bike.

re width and flare. Again, I can only compare my 42cm regular drop bars that have shallow drop and short reach to my also 42cm Salsa Cowbells with 12 degree flare on my touring bike. For my shoulder size, 42 works well, but thats me, but I do like the flared out drops a lot.

you know, as the other guy said, you're going to have to try to get to a store in toronto or something that actually has diff bars in store and hold them and reckon and reckon...

also reckon and try to get an idea of how much stuff you'll need to buy, panniers, tent, etc etc etc and make some judgement decisions of where its better to put money.
djb is offline  
Old 12-13-20, 09:05 AM
  #7  
bktourer1
Senior Member
 
bktourer1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Western Ma.
Posts: 867

Bikes: Diamondback "parkway" Spec. "expedition

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 25 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 15 Times in 13 Posts
What handlebar bag is that? Looks good and I need to replace my Topeak bag
bktourer1 is offline  
Old 12-13-20, 10:22 AM
  #8  
Tourist in MSN
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 8,496

Bikes: 1961 Ideor, 1966 Perfekt 3 Speed AB Hub, 1994 Bridgestone MB-6, 2006 Airnimal Joey, 2009 Thorn Sherpa, 2013 Thorn Nomad MkII, 2015 VO Pass Hunter, 2017 Lynskey Backroad, 2017 Raleigh Gran Prix, 1980s Bianchi Mixte on a trainer. Others are now gone.

Mentioned: 38 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2355 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 598 Times in 493 Posts
Originally Posted by bktourer1 View Post
What handlebar bag is that? Looks good and I need to replace my Topeak bag
If that question was directed to me, in the photos there are three different Louis Garneau bags, none of which are still in production. I initially bought two over a decade ago from Nashbar that were clearance priced. Later, bought two more of a different model from someone else, again clearance price, at that time I mainly bought two more to get more Louis Garneau brackets so I could put them on more bikes. Later bought one more Louis Garneau at a swap meet, mostly to get a fifth mounting bracket.

All of them are not sufficiently waterproof so I need a rain cover, all of them sag with any weight in them so I added aluminum bars underneath to support the weight, and all three designs had poor stiffeners in the lid so I cut out a seam and put in stiffer plastic into the lid and re-sewed the seam.

If I was shopping for one now and if I was not locked into a bracket system that I already had on other bikes, I would probably buy the Ortlieb. But I have those LG handlebar brackets on five bikes so I am locked into that brand.

***

I should have mentioned this earlier and did not think of it. Handlebar bags do not always play well with brifters or bar end cable runs.

I have two bikes with Campy brifter for the rear. They work, but it is a tight fit. I am sure you noticed that I use a second stem to lower my bar bag. If I had not done that, this bag and this brifter would not work well because of the bag width.



And I am repeating this image from a post above, note that my bar end shifter cables do not run the typical way, instead they are under my bar tape for the full length of the tape. This way my cables do not interfere with the bag.



A friend of mine used to use the older style Shimano brifters where the cables came straight out of the side, he used V brake noodles to make his cable runs out of the brifters work better with his bar bag.



.
Tourist in MSN is offline  
Old 12-13-20, 07:38 PM
  #9  
veganbikes
Clark W. Griswold
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: ,location, location
Posts: 8,833

Bikes: Foundry Chilkoot Ti W/Ultegra Di2, Salsa Timberjack Ti, Cinelli Mash Work RandoCross Fun Time Machine, 1x9 XT Parts Hybrid, Co-Motion Cascadia, Specialized Langster, Phil Wood Apple VeloXS Frame (w/DA 7400), Cilo Road Frame, Proteus frame, Ti 26 MTB

Mentioned: 38 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2461 Post(s)
Liked 1,491 Times in 997 Posts
Originally Posted by Jno View Post
I am looking at handlebars and have discounted a number for one reason or another but I hope the forum can offer its opinion about touring-usefulness of the Trek elite isozone sf ($130 Canadian). Among the things I don’t know:
  • 1. does a typical touring cockpit require rounded bars for affixing gear?
  • 2. Would gel inserts or other bar scultping aspects (flat/aero features) make bar surface off-puttingly irregular over time?
  • 3. Is drop depth a factor for some reason beyond my body’s comfort/familiarity etc
  • 4. Is there a narrowness of bars at which a loaded bike is likely too difficult to steer comfortably, or which is too narrow to host a “typical” array of stuff?
Thanks forum
The bar is $10 (American) cheaper than my favorite drop bar the ZIPP Service Course SL-70 Ergo bars and 70g heavier but similar over all. I don't know if the foam will do much but it probably isn't so terrible. I like ergonomic bars so I don't find them off putting at all. I hate round bars personally as I am all about that comfort bout that comfort bout that comfort no treble (to quote that song that the kids like). I haven't had issues affixing stuff to the bars but I do find I don't have a ton of space but depending on what I am carrying I can use my Daija Cycle works Handlebar Accessory Mount for threadless stems to mount stuff (though it looks like Velo Orange discontinued that product?)

For my height and width and shoulders and comfort touring I generally prefer the 44cm bars. I found from my original Disc Trucker that I was not as comfortable on the narrower bars so I found some wide ones in the ZIPPs because I was on a ZIPP kick at the time and so glad I did. I figure if I had done the bar swap with now parts I would probably have looked for one of the really wide drop bars that are out now like Nitto and Crust were doing.

I find the compact drops to be OK for me though I am not frequently in that area but when I am it is comfortable enough dimension wise.

If you want drops ones like described would be great but if you are going with more a flat/alt bar set up I would highly look at the Koga Denham Bars or the Surly Moloko Bars (if you don't mind some weight...steel is real) or the Velo Orange Crazy Bars (which is what Alee Denham based his bars on) Multiple hand positions are great and sometimes for some a drop bar isn't the right positions for them but these bars could be?!
veganbikes is offline  
Old 12-14-20, 03:18 AM
  #10  
elcruxio
Senior Member
 
elcruxio's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Turku, Finland, Europe
Posts: 2,002

Bikes: 2011 Specialized crux comp, 2013 Specialized Rockhopper Pro

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 442 Post(s)
Liked 57 Times in 44 Posts
Funnily enough I just this morning received a package containing the Denham Bar. I'll try it out first on my utility bike and if it works i'll transfer it to my touring bike.

I've long used a drop bar on a tourer but I've recently come to consider other options. I rarely use the drops on tour but I'm always pining for a shorter position. Because my touring bike has been too long for me I've ended up going too fast to keep my composure up on the bike which has led to fast but short days on the bike. A shorter fit likely would allow me to go easier and longer for more distance.

The denham bar has a short leverage position, medium climbing position and a long stretched position. We'll see how it goes. I'm optimistic.

as an added bonus, straight bar mtb components are much cheaper than road components and also easier to fit wide gearing.
elcruxio is offline  
Likes For elcruxio:
Old 12-14-20, 04:35 AM
  #11  
djb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Montreal Canada
Posts: 11,722
Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2146 Post(s)
Liked 545 Times in 464 Posts
Originally Posted by elcruxio View Post
Funnily enough I just this morning received a package containing the Denham Bar. I'll try it out first on my utility bike and if it works i'll transfer it to my touring bike.

I've long used a drop bar on a tourer but I've recently come to consider other options. I rarely use the drops on tour but I'm always pining for a shorter position. Because my touring bike has been too long for me I've ended up going too fast to keep my composure up on the bike which has led to fast but short days on the bike. A shorter fit likely would allow me to go easier and longer for more distance.

The denham bar has a short leverage position, medium climbing position and a long stretched position. We'll see how it goes. I'm optimistic.

as an added bonus, straight bar mtb components are much cheaper than road components and also easier to fit wide gearing.
the denhams look neat, would be fun to try sometime. Keep in mind on your utility bike that they may be a theft draw.

re drops and your too long for you touring bike, this is a prefect example of how a well suited and set up bike with proper seat to bars distance, good bar level height (ie head tube not too low down and long enough steerer) , combined with shallow and short dropbars-- all combines that you can comfortably use the drops for periods of time.

long headwind or side wind days will make you appreciate a good drop bar setup. My troll with dropbars works well in drops with headwinds, and it's really down to height of bars.

have fun with those denhams
djb is offline  
Old 12-14-20, 05:52 AM
  #12  
elcruxio
Senior Member
 
elcruxio's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Turku, Finland, Europe
Posts: 2,002

Bikes: 2011 Specialized crux comp, 2013 Specialized Rockhopper Pro

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 442 Post(s)
Liked 57 Times in 44 Posts
Originally Posted by djb View Post
the denhams look neat, would be fun to try sometime. Keep in mind on your utility bike that they may be a theft draw.

re drops and your too long for you touring bike, this is a prefect example of how a well suited and set up bike with proper seat to bars distance, good bar level height (ie head tube not too low down and long enough steerer) , combined with shallow and short dropbars-- all combines that you can comfortably use the drops for periods of time.

long headwind or side wind days will make you appreciate a good drop bar setup. My troll with dropbars works well in drops with headwinds, and it's really down to height of bars.

have fun with those denhams
The main reason why I nowdays feel too stretched out on bikes which used to suit me "fine" is because I've started to pay more attention to all kinds of postural things. Started from pelvic posture (ie. how tilted the pelvis is on the saddle) to upper back posture (from yoga and kettlebell training and from riding with aerobars). I've come to realize that with all my road bikes I've had my shoulders rolled forward a bit. It's not untypical for road cyclists to do this and in the pro peloton I'd wager most roll their shoulders forward to reach the bars better and to also keep their pelvises a bit more upright.
This on the other hand has caused issues fro me with neck and shoulder pain and it has dawned on me, that if I have to reach for the bars with my shoulders the bike is too long. Hence, if the bike is too long, too much weight on hands and all the issues that causes.

The problem that arises is that there doesn't seem to be touring bikes on the market which are short enough for me to comfortably use a drop bar. The LHT I have has a reach of just over 400mm so a little more than the standard 400mm in my size range. I've calculated that I'd need a reach of under 380 to be able to use a drop bar. But the only bike I've found from any road class bike (road, gravel, tour, etc) that has short enough reach is the Trek Domane. Mostly it would seem that touring bikes err on the longer side. I've seen a lot of reach measurements in the region of 410 to 430mm in the stack numbers I'd be comfortable with.

The denhams shorten the cockpit considerably. Perhaps even so much, that I need to break out the 100mm+ stems. My 130mm hasn't seen action in years. But I haven't tried them yet so no idea how they'll work. If they don't they'll get a place on my utility bike and I'll start considering a custom frame for my next touring machine.
The utility bike doesn't get left alone much. Typically 15-30 minutes tops with a secure lock.

One thing the wider denham bar might prove useful with the the child trailer we recently got for our kid. We're planning to take him touring next summer when he's around one year old. The wider bar might be more stable with the loaded and trailered bike which trumps the speed benefit I'd get from using the drop bars.
elcruxio is offline  
Old 12-14-20, 06:53 AM
  #13  
djb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Montreal Canada
Posts: 11,722
Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2146 Post(s)
Liked 545 Times in 464 Posts
Originally Posted by elcruxio View Post
The main reason why I nowdays feel too stretched out on bikes which used to suit me "fine" is because I've started to pay more attention to all kinds of postural things. Started from pelvic posture (ie. how tilted the pelvis is on the saddle) to upper back posture (from yoga and kettlebell training and from riding with aerobars). I've come to realize that with all my road bikes I've had my shoulders rolled forward a bit. It's not untypical for road cyclists to do this and in the pro peloton I'd wager most roll their shoulders forward to reach the bars better and to also keep their pelvises a bit more upright.
This on the other hand has caused issues fro me with neck and shoulder pain and it has dawned on me, that if I have to reach for the bars with my shoulders the bike is too long. Hence, if the bike is too long, too much weight on hands and all the issues that causes.

The problem that arises is that there doesn't seem to be touring bikes on the market which are short enough for me to comfortably use a drop bar. The LHT I have has a reach of just over 400mm so a little more than the standard 400mm in my size range. I've calculated that I'd need a reach of under 380 to be able to use a drop bar. But the only bike I've found from any road class bike (road, gravel, tour, etc) that has short enough reach is the Trek Domane. Mostly it would seem that touring bikes err on the longer side. I've seen a lot of reach measurements in the region of 410 to 430mm in the stack numbers I'd be comfortable with.

The denhams shorten the cockpit considerably. Perhaps even so much, that I need to break out the 100mm+ stems. My 130mm hasn't seen action in years. But I haven't tried them yet so no idea how they'll work. If they don't they'll get a place on my utility bike and I'll start considering a custom frame for my next touring machine.
The utility bike doesn't get left alone much. Typically 15-30 minutes tops with a secure lock.

One thing the wider denham bar might prove useful with the the child trailer we recently got for our kid. We're planning to take him touring next summer when he's around one year old. The wider bar might be more stable with the loaded and trailered bike which trumps the speed benefit I'd get from using the drop bars.
re reach, I dont recall the numbers of the tt on my troll vs my cross bike (other dropbar bike I ride a lot) but I know the tt is longer on the troll, but I simply put a very short stem on the troll, like a 55mm or something. Contrary to common belief, this causes no issues whatsoever for "twitchiness" or overly fast steering at all. The troll already is a nice quick handling bike steering wise, being more of a mountain bike ish design, but I have another bike that I commute on with a long stem that is border line overly twitchy, whereas the troll even unloaded with that short stem steers very confidently and safe. So just saying, dont be afraid of going with a really short stem, although every bike is different and every rider is different as to what feels "overly quick" and "twitchy" and their comfort level.

To me, the big thing with the troll vs my crossbike is that even if the bars are slightly more forward on the troll, they are slightly higher than the other bike, so my back feels good with the strechout and pelvis position, but as the bars are higher, it means I can very much ride the drops comfortably, and do so at times for short stretches just to give my back a different position. The fact that the drops are also shallow AND back towards me more than some traditional drops , means they work wonderfully.

as for wider bars and kid trailers--I hear ya. I was doing this 20 years ago and still recall how my then dropbar bike with narrow bars (old school tourer) was rather sketchy feeling with trailer and then those pull behind one wheel kid bike things attached to your seatpost--so yes, wider bars will make a real positive impact when pulling a heavy trailer etc.
For this same reason of more leverage etc, I love my flared out Cowbells on my loaded up Troll, as in the drops I have more leverage and really like how it helps me slalom on downhills around potholes or whatever due to the extra leverage.
djb is offline  
Old 12-14-20, 07:57 AM
  #14  
Tourist in MSN
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 8,496

Bikes: 1961 Ideor, 1966 Perfekt 3 Speed AB Hub, 1994 Bridgestone MB-6, 2006 Airnimal Joey, 2009 Thorn Sherpa, 2013 Thorn Nomad MkII, 2015 VO Pass Hunter, 2017 Lynskey Backroad, 2017 Raleigh Gran Prix, 1980s Bianchi Mixte on a trainer. Others are now gone.

Mentioned: 38 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2355 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 598 Times in 493 Posts
Originally Posted by elcruxio View Post
Funnily enough I just this morning received a package containing the Denham Bar. I'll try it out first on my utility bike and if it works i'll transfer it to my touring bike.

I've long used a drop bar on a tourer but I've recently come to consider other options. I rarely use the drops on tour but I'm always pining for a shorter position. Because my touring bike has been too long for me I've ended up going too fast to keep my composure up on the bike which has led to fast but short days on the bike. A shorter fit likely would allow me to go easier and longer for more distance.
...
When I try to size a new bike or frame that I might purchase for use with drop bars, the first thing I look at is top tube length, and only after that do I look a stand over height. And now with sloping top tubes being so common, standover height is almost never a concern for me.

One of my bikes, the manufacturer did not make a drop bar version, so the sizing was a little more complicated as I was buying a slightly smaller frame than I would normally buy to get the top tube length that I wanted, which meant a lot of seatpost sticking out of the frame. I was rather nervous about ordering this frame, as it is the most expensive frame I have bought and I was buying it from Europe so shipping and customs would make a return very difficult.

I use the drops about 30 percent of the time, mostly for headwinds. There have been days with strong headwinds where I am so happy I have drop bars.

But it really is personal preference. A lot of people in Europe tour on flat bars so there is some regional variation too.

So, if you would prefer to sit more upright, go for it.
Tourist in MSN is offline  
Old 12-14-20, 09:29 AM
  #15  
Happy Feet
Senior Member
 
Happy Feet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Left Coast, Canada
Posts: 5,029
Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2163 Post(s)
Liked 1,237 Times in 671 Posts
Originally Posted by djb View Post
re reach, I dont recall the numbers of the tt on my troll vs my cross bike (other dropbar bike I ride a lot) but I know the tt is longer on the troll, but I simply put a very short stem on the troll, like a 55mm or something. Contrary to common belief, this causes no issues whatsoever for "twitchiness" or overly fast steering at all.
In the picture of my cockpit above, I have a very short stem and don't notice over twitchiness. My take on bike sizing is that the trend is for smaller frame sizes that are compensated for with longer stems. Sort of like old school rigid mtbs.
Happy Feet is offline  
Old 12-14-20, 08:19 PM
  #16  
veganbikes
Clark W. Griswold
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: ,location, location
Posts: 8,833

Bikes: Foundry Chilkoot Ti W/Ultegra Di2, Salsa Timberjack Ti, Cinelli Mash Work RandoCross Fun Time Machine, 1x9 XT Parts Hybrid, Co-Motion Cascadia, Specialized Langster, Phil Wood Apple VeloXS Frame (w/DA 7400), Cilo Road Frame, Proteus frame, Ti 26 MTB

Mentioned: 38 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2461 Post(s)
Liked 1,491 Times in 997 Posts
Originally Posted by elcruxio View Post
Funnily enough I just this morning received a package containing the Denham Bar. I'll try it out first on my utility bike and if it works i'll transfer it to my touring bike.
.
Originally Posted by djb View Post
the denhams look neat, would be fun to try sometime. Keep in mind on your utility bike that they may be a theft draw.

have fun with those denhams
Elcrux is in Finland, if I am going to travel all that way I might as well just go purchase them myself stealing them would be too much risk.

I don't normally condone stealing but the jerks at Koga refuse to let us sell those bars here in the U.S. and maybe just maybe if they saw an international theft ring they might reconsider since all the attempts I have tried to make over the past couple years and the attempts some other friends and co-workers in the industry have tried have failed.

They are really awesome bars I haven't had much time but having tried the VO Crazy Bars and the Molokos and then getting a short try on those I was like, yep those are the ones. I have even considered having them custom made in titanium but the cost is more than I can spend at the moment and while yes I can order them my last order through De Vakantiefietser had PayPal issues and I canceled and when I was going to order again they were out of stock and then COVID hit and I haven't tried again and now they have a 31.8 bar which is awesome as I can use the stem I wanted to originally but again no stock.
veganbikes is offline  
Old 12-19-20, 06:49 PM
  #17  
Jno
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Posts: 104
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 90 Post(s)
Liked 11 Times in 9 Posts
Spank handlebars?

Having decided I want dropbars, and basically conventional ones, I wonder if anybody has used these: Spank bars vibration-cancelling foam ones with slight flare (12 degrees). It is called “vibrocore” and the model is Wing. It is marketed for gravel riding.
Jno is offline  
Old 12-20-20, 12:04 AM
  #18  
Happy Feet
Senior Member
 
Happy Feet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Left Coast, Canada
Posts: 5,029
Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2163 Post(s)
Liked 1,237 Times in 671 Posts
Originally Posted by Jno View Post
Having decided I want dropbars, and basically conventional ones, I wonder if anybody has used these: Spank bars vibration-cancelling foam ones with slight flare (12 degrees). It is called “vibrocore” and the model is Wing. It is marketed for gravel riding.
Those look fine to me. A little pricey compared to other equivalents but not outrageously so. The vibracore is gimmicky. Just some fancily marketed expanding spray foam squirted in to "supposedly" dampen vibration. Ok sure meh...
Happy Feet is offline  
Old 12-20-20, 03:44 AM
  #19  
Germany_chris
Senior Member
 
Germany_chris's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Southern Germany
Posts: 1,453
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 290 Post(s)
Liked 417 Times in 226 Posts
If you want vibration dampening just go old school and wrap the bars with an old bike tube split long ways
Germany_chris is offline  
Old 12-20-20, 08:05 AM
  #20  
Tourist in MSN
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 8,496

Bikes: 1961 Ideor, 1966 Perfekt 3 Speed AB Hub, 1994 Bridgestone MB-6, 2006 Airnimal Joey, 2009 Thorn Sherpa, 2013 Thorn Nomad MkII, 2015 VO Pass Hunter, 2017 Lynskey Backroad, 2017 Raleigh Gran Prix, 1980s Bianchi Mixte on a trainer. Others are now gone.

Mentioned: 38 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2355 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 598 Times in 493 Posts
If you mean these:
https://www.wiggle.co.uk/spank-wing-...blackblack44cm

***

Vibration. I did a week long van supported trip with ACA in West Texas about two and a half years ago. For a week there was a very rough chip seal. I had my folding bike with 40mm wide Schwalbe Marathon tires. First day had between 55 and 60 psi in the front tire. My hands took a beating on that chip seal and my GPS started acting up, the GPS did not like the vibration either. Day two, I dropped my front tire pressure to between 40 and 45 psi. The vibration was litterally gone. And I was not perceptibly slower, some people in the group were faster than me, some slower and that remained the same on the second day as on the first day. I kept my front tire at that lower pressure for the rest of the week. I use one layer of cork tape on my bars. On most of my bikes, there is an extra layer of some cushioning foam under the tape on the tops of the bars.

My point is that in my opinion the tire pressure is the best way to deal with vibration, along with a good thick tape that does not feel hard to the touch.

And, I think having a front pair of panniers mounted on the fork adds some dead weight to the bike close to the hub, that might absorb some of the road vibration too when touring.

In my opinion, if some vibration dampening foam was that desirable, we would all have bought a can of expanding foam and done that decades ago on our bikes.

***

I think I prefer zero flair, but different people have different preferences. I use the drops when I am pushing into a headwind, I do not see any real advantage to the drops being wider than the tops. But I can see how on rough gravel, having part of the bars a bit wider for leverage could come in handy, but in my view I would not want my most aero position to be wider. I have never used time trial bars, but I would be scared to try them on an unknown road where my bike loaded down with a lot of weight. I know some people use them, but I think they are not for me.

From the photos, I did not see cable grooves in the bars.

I have one pair of bars with the flat top section, I thought that I would enjoy that more, but I do not ride with my hands on the tops of the bars there as much as I thought I did. In post number two above, I had a photo of the bars on one of my bikes, repeated that photo below. I think the bars are Bontrager which is a brand that Trek owns. You can see there is a slightly flatter area near the top that I refer to. I think I installed these bars about four years ago, I do not recall exactly but I think they also lacked cable grooves. I think I used filament strapping tape to hold the cables in place before I wrapped the bar tape.



Different people have different preferences for angle of the bar behind the brake levers, I prefer that to be horizontal. And different people have different preferences for how the brake levers are angled, I prefer mine to be angled up a bit more than most people. I am not saying you should replicate it, it is a personal preference thing.

Since you are having the bike built up, you will have the option to take the bike without bar tape and do a few rides, then you can decide exactly where you want the brake levers installed on the bars before the tape is put on. Otherwise you will get the preference bias that the bike shop employee had when your bike was set up. Alternatively, if you really like your setup on your road bike, you could have the bike shop employee check out how it is set up on your road bike before the tape is applied.

Other considerations, I do not know if you will have handlebar bag bracket clamps on your bars, a GPS, or anything else. But those bars do not have a lot of round bar in the middle to attach stuff. I like interrupter brake levers too, but most people don't use them, those levers also require some round bar that is reasonably close to the stem. And you can see in the photo that I use a second stem to lower my handlebar bag.
Tourist in MSN is offline  
Old 12-20-20, 08:21 AM
  #21  
djb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Montreal Canada
Posts: 11,722
Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2146 Post(s)
Liked 545 Times in 464 Posts
Tourist-- all really good points

jno, you're getting a lot of good advice here. This is why we are paid the big bucks eh !

really good points on bar and hoods position. I really recommend riding a lot in 2021 to figure stuff out. On my troll I initially had the hoods a bit up like tourists, but after a trip realized I'd like them a bit better more level.

but that's another example of small changes helping, or how as ride more,we see little changes that are worth doing, but all personal.

re slight flareout of bars, 12 degrees isn't much, not compared to some, and the bit of extra leverage is nice even with gusting side winds.
but again, only way to know is to live with them.
djb is offline  
Old 12-20-20, 08:50 AM
  #22  
Buddy Hall
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2020
Posts: 12
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
First, let me say that you really do need handlebars! In fact, I'd almost say that they are essential - a bike without handlebars just isn't a bike :>) And yes, it's early and I need coffee before I become a whole person. For touring, I'm a big fan of the Nitto Noodle handlebar - it has a nicely rounded curve into the drops, as opposed to the more abrupt change I see on other bars. I like the 46 cm size, I find these to not only be very comfortable but they also allow for plenty of room to attach a handlebar bag and not feel cramped. Best wishes, and regardless of the bars you select, don't tour without them!

Buddy Hall
Buddy Hall is offline  
Old 12-20-20, 08:55 AM
  #23  
djb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Montreal Canada
Posts: 11,722
Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2146 Post(s)
Liked 545 Times in 464 Posts
Others have mentioned this before, but the last fellow bringing up width is a good reminder-- about shifters and handlebar bag width.
keep it in mind about shift lever throw.
djb is offline  
Old 12-20-20, 11:31 AM
  #24  
Jno
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Posts: 104
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 90 Post(s)
Liked 11 Times in 9 Posts
Tip of the hat to the forum

I am leaning towards a more traditional Bontrager drop bar (no real flare) and, if I regret it after trying it for a while I can consider the flared ones, even though I will need to take into account the useable bar-terrain for mounting handlebar bag and Garmin.

As far as taping thickness, I like the idea of riding with bars without tape for a while - that will help clarify.
Jno is offline  
Old 12-20-20, 01:05 PM
  #25  
djb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Montreal Canada
Posts: 11,722
Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2146 Post(s)
Liked 545 Times in 464 Posts
Re vibrations, I've also found that different bike gloves are quite different in hand comfort, so try on and look at feel the different gel inserts, placement, thickness, how many.... all makes a difference. The ones I prefer tend not to be the most expensive, but some models have much better placement and thickness of gel inserts that make all the difference. Over the years now I know what works better for me, I always bring my old ones as a reference back to back when looking for new gloves.
djb is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.