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Possible tour of South America while writing/working?

Old 12-21-20, 07:46 AM
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afrowheels
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Possible tour of South America while writing/working?

Hi All,

I'm a newcomer to this forum - used to be on LonelyPlanet's TT. Looking for some informed thoughts on an idea for a possible long tour. I have experience of one 6 month solo tour in East & Southern Africa (although that was a long time ago) and some shorter, easier touring in Europe. Would be reusing a lot of that equipment and a lightly-used Surly LHT that I need to rebuild in parts since the first effort was rushed and I'm not especially happy with it (will likely post on that later when I get to it).

The basic idea: solo touring South America from Columbia/Ecuador down to Patagonia over about 12-18months while working/writing on the road as an academic 'in-between jobs'. Budget is not a very tight constraint but I'd prefer to live frugally most of the time: part of the point is to do something more interesting and cheaper than just staying where I am to write academic papers.

Some specific questions:

1. My Spanish is non-existent and I'd like to be able to communicate to some degree and have the foundations to learn along the way. So I was thinking of finding a relatively cheap base for the first 2-3 months and taking Spanish lessons. I've seen Ecuador recommended as a good option - would people agree with that? What's a reasonable budget for this part?

2. Has anyone else tried to do something like this in the sense of doing a significant amount of writing/remote work (besides blogging - not that I'm knocking that) while on the road? Is it a silly idea or could it be workable? One option is to do a little regularly, the other that I lean towards is alternating between cycling and finding a nice spot to rest and write for a while.

3. I know it can be quite variable, but what are the going estimates for daily costs for cycle touring in this region using either cheap accommodation or camping most of the time?

Those are my own questions for now, any thoughts/advice would be welcome.

Cheers,

AW
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Old 12-21-20, 09:01 AM
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Originally Posted by afrowheels View Post
... One option is to do a little regularly, the other that I lean towards is alternating between cycling and finding a nice spot to rest and write for a while
I’ll comment just on this

On a three month tour, I stayed at a campsite in the south of Portugal for a month to write part of my second book (nothing to do with bicycles). I only write in the mornings, usually for no more than two hours, so I had tons of time to explore on bike and foot without having to build and break camp every day.

In the future, I may try writing in the mornings, then moving in the afternoons. The other way round wouldn’t work for me.

If you’re the kind of writer who works a disciplined eight hour day, then it might be hard to move every day, so staying in one spot for a longer time might work better to get into routines.
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Old 12-21-20, 12:42 PM
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I love S. America. I have never bike toured there but have traveled for multiple weeks. Most of my time has been in Chile or Colombia, both wonderful countries.
Chile, while not expensive is not cheap. Their wine is very inexpensive and delicious. They have some incredible scenery, great beef and seafood. One main N/S road, head east and you will high into the Andes, head west and you go to the ocean. Make sure to go to Valparaiso
Colombia is very inexpensive, B&B was $20 including breakfast. Colombians are some of the most friendly people you will ever meet. The hills are incredibly steep in Colombia, no wonder Quintana is such a great cyclist, in fact Colombia has some of the best cyclists in the world. They love cycling there.

Internet:
Chile, very good in the bigger cities and smaller villages.
Colombia: I found it decent but not great.

I have a friend who has done what you are proposing. He biked across the U.S., around Thailand, then rode from the NW of U.S. to S.A. through Mexico, Central America and S. A. He stopped a few times (Panama, Nicaragua and Colombia) for extended stays (months) and also took classes in Spanish. He speaks Spanish very well these days. He did not like the roadside trash in many areas, I agree as it can be overwhelming at times. He seldom camped as the rentals were so cheap. Unfortunately he did get mugged/robbed in Colombia. I think it was near Santa Marta. I did not care for Santa Marta either, much preferred Cartagena. Apparently he rode alone in an area people told him not to ride. He is fine but it left a bad impression on him. I am not trying to scare you but do your homework on the different areas you plan to ride, most are great but some are sketchy.
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Old 12-22-20, 08:15 AM
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Afro feller, interesting idea, but what I can add is that from my experience living and travelling in Latin America, not only are you dealing with simply being on a bike tour, which takes mental and physical energy (ie not a hell of a lot of oomph left at the end of the day) which would apply to travelling by bike in Ontario, Canada or Florida U, S and A, but you'd be dealing with a lot of other factors being in far off countries.

I'm referring to the regular stuff, dealing with change of cultures, figuring out slowly when to be wary, when to not worry, figuring out language and communication, be verrrrrrrry wary of security overall, keeping track of your stuff (even moreso when on your own).
I've travelled on my own in Central America, but even back then I had the advantage of being somewhat familiar with "stuff" and had a reasonable take on the language.
I've also biked in the area, but both times with a riding partner, which made things easier security wise.

On my bike trips in the last few years, I can say that it takes a lot of energy to write after biking in the day. And yes, you can hold up in places for X days and work, so of course things are doable, but given that you havent bike toured before, its easy to imagine you "working and travelling" at the same time.
re security, you'd have to be very careful of thinking out the nuts and bolts of stuff also, ie keeping a device working and safe, keeping work backed up and safe, what if worst case scenario happens and some dude stops and sticks a gun in your face and steals everything? Is your work backed up, will spotty or non existent wifi allow you to backup stuff properly? Not fun scenarios but necessary crap to think about if you're responsible.

heck, and then we get to the whole covid thing. Developing countries are going to be down on the low rung for vaccines, and this may even exacerbate the whole "rich gringo" thing that as rich gringos that we are frankly, we have to be aware of being there in how we are seen and perceived, so if its "rich effing gringo who also has had a vaccine while I've / we've been suffering here and even poorer than before"----you get my drift.

just throwing out ideas here, don't want to rain on your parade, but there's a certain amount of truth in my views.
In reading over what I wrote, I think the covid thing may be the biggest obstacle. The mierda going on in both of our countries (I assume you are a Yanqui) aint over, and the fat lady wont be singing for a while , and being fat and with high blood pressure and all, I hope she can still sing if she gets covid going to the local Walmart.....

you know, if you're at all serious of this idea, I highly recommend that you start working on acquiring some Spanish. It's a slow process, that's normal, and worth it if you have more time and can stick at it gradually. Getting even the basic use of another language always has pluses in life anyway, so there's no real downside to starting now, even if you decide to go to Albania or Singapore to work and travel.
cheers
---------------------------------------------------------
ps, from your previous touring experience, which I didnt really register to be honest, you've got lots of experience being in other cultures, so you're very aware of all of this side of things. Sorry I didn't catch that properly.

I can only give rough estimates of daily expenses for some Central American countries and Mexico, but it would be very easy for you to check out recentish Crazy Guy on a Bike South American journals to get good cost estimates for various countries. Check out Tim Towers stuff, he's an older guy who has biked a lot in Central and South America and is a prolific note taker, great for details and costs etc.
At least with cgoab you'll get a good idea of costs from the last few years, which should be relevant still.

Last edited by djb; 12-22-20 at 08:28 AM. Reason: added the p.s.
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Old 12-22-20, 10:13 AM
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I highly recommend Spanish language schools. The cost is variable, mostly depending on the country you want to study in. It's easy to find the costs online. I attended language schools in Mexico & Costa Rica, both of which are more expensive countries than Ecuador. I did "homestays" each time, that is, living with a host family. Each country has its own version of Spanish. I have found the Spanish in Colombia, Ecuador, Costa Rica, & Mexico easy to understand. Chilean Spanish was the most difficult for me. Argentine & Uruguayan Spanish are heavily influenced by the substantial Italian immigration to both countries, but I still found it easier than Chilean Spanish. Also, touring costs are extremely variable in Latin America, once again depending on the country, and how you're living I've toured in multiple countries in Latin America but never camped there, so I can't help you with that. My most recent tour was in Colombia (note the spelling) in early 2019. Gorgeous country, friendly people, exhausting cycling, and fairly inexpensive if you've got western currency. Some parts of the country are quite safe (such as the "zona cafetera" where I was touring, and other parts of the country are not at all safe. Various government websites have information, along with guidebooks. My first tour in S. America was in Chile & northern Patagonia in Argentina. That region would be conducive to camping, though I stayed mainly in hospedajes (bed & breakfast). Stunning scenery. I was in Ecuador many years ago, but it sounds like quite a few things have changed since I was there.

I would hope that you're not considering this trip until Covid ceases to be a major issue. The situation is pretty dire in much of Latin America.
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Old 12-22-20, 11:36 AM
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Originally Posted by afrowheels View Post
[...snip...] as an academic 'in-between jobs'.
If you are an academic (i.e. with PhD), depending on your field and vitae, I'd ask around for a visiting position -- RA/TA/lecturer -- or something like that. Perhaps not asking for a salary but some kind of stipend to cover housing and basic necessities. You may also/instead want to write a few emails to some faculties, telling them about your personal story and goals, and asking for suggestions. Perhaps start by creating a web page that would describe your African trip.

WRT writing on the road, just a thought: touring with a laptop is no fun for at least 2 reasons. Every day (1) you'll have to get near an outlet to recharge the battery; (2) you'll worry about theft. Well, actually, three reasons: (3) a laptop is bulky/heavy. You may want to experiment with a Moleskin and a pen, taking notes on the road rather than attempting complete a manuscript while on the move.

Great project. Have fun.
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Old 12-28-20, 03:59 PM
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Thanks Timi.

Good to know that it can be done. Still trying to figure-out my best writing strategy (even after many years!) but what you describe sounds feasible.
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Old 12-28-20, 04:04 PM
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Thanks Charlie, happy to have some recommendations. And $20 for a B&B is not bad. My experience touring in African countries was often similar: accommodation cheap enough I rarely camped.

The crime story is also useful. Always tricky to know when to take local advice: sometimes it's just people thinking their neighbours are less trustworthy than they are! But I know Colombia has some serious issues.
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Old 12-28-20, 04:12 PM
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Originally Posted by djb View Post
Afro feller, interesting idea, but what I can add is that from my experience living and travelling in Latin America, not only are you dealing with simply being on a bike tour, which takes mental and physical energy (ie not a hell of a lot of oomph left at the end of the day) which would apply to travelling by bike in Ontario, Canada or Florida U, S and A, but you'd be dealing with a lot of other factors being in far off countries.

I'm referring to the regular stuff, dealing with change of cultures, figuring out slowly when to be wary, when to not worry, figuring out language and communication, be verrrrrrrry wary of security overall, keeping track of your stuff (even moreso when on your own).
I've travelled on my own in Central America, but even back then I had the advantage of being somewhat familiar with "stuff" and had a reasonable take on the language.
I've also biked in the area, but both times with a riding partner, which made things easier security wise.

On my bike trips in the last few years, I can say that it takes a lot of energy to write after biking in the day. And yes, you can hold up in places for X days and work, so of course things are doable, but given that you havent bike toured before, its easy to imagine you "working and travelling" at the same time.
re security, you'd have to be very careful of thinking out the nuts and bolts of stuff also, ie keeping a device working and safe, keeping work backed up and safe, what if worst case scenario happens and some dude stops and sticks a gun in your face and steals everything? Is your work backed up, will spotty or non existent wifi allow you to backup stuff properly? Not fun scenarios but necessary crap to think about if you're responsible.

heck, and then we get to the whole covid thing. Developing countries are going to be down on the low rung for vaccines, and this may even exacerbate the whole "rich gringo" thing that as rich gringos that we are frankly, we have to be aware of being there in how we are seen and perceived, so if its "rich effing gringo who also has had a vaccine while I've / we've been suffering here and even poorer than before"----you get my drift.

just throwing out ideas here, don't want to rain on your parade, but there's a certain amount of truth in my views.
In reading over what I wrote, I think the covid thing may be the biggest obstacle. The mierda going on in both of our countries (I assume you are a Yanqui) aint over, and the fat lady wont be singing for a while , and being fat and with high blood pressure and all, I hope she can still sing if she gets covid going to the local Walmart.....

you know, if you're at all serious of this idea, I highly recommend that you start working on acquiring some Spanish. It's a slow process, that's normal, and worth it if you have more time and can stick at it gradually. Getting even the basic use of another language always has pluses in life anyway, so there's no real downside to starting now, even if you decide to go to Albania or Singapore to work and travel.
cheers
---------------------------------------------------------
ps, from your previous touring experience, which I didnt really register to be honest, you've got lots of experience being in other cultures, so you're very aware of all of this side of things. Sorry I didn't catch that properly.

I can only give rough estimates of daily expenses for some Central American countries and Mexico, but it would be very easy for you to check out recentish Crazy Guy on a Bike South American journals to get good cost estimates for various countries. Check out Tim Towers stuff, he's an older guy who has biked a lot in Central and South America and is a prolific note taker, great for details and costs etc.
At least with cgoab you'll get a good idea of costs from the last few years, which should be relevant still.
Thanks djb. No problem re raining on the parade: good to get a range of views. If I set myself on doing it then I will - not easily put off - but want to be well-informed.

Yeah, I'm reasonably well-travelled so in that sense I am aware of the difficulties. If I did this tour the way I did my last long one then academic writing would not be feasible IMO for the reasons you mention. So I would need to either have shorter days/mileage or longer stop overs (or both).

I also live in a developing country with crime rates to rival Colombia so reasonably street smart. But touring does make one more vulnerable and securing or/and not drawing attention to myself with a device is a significant consideration.

With my last tour I thought I was going to be cycling in West Africa so I took French lessons...then ended-up in East Africa instead and had to learn Swahili from scratch. Just want to try and avoid that situation again if possible.

Re Covid: this tour would probably only start in 2022, so hopefully the worst will be over by then and people will be happy to have anyone spending money... Not sure if I'll have been able to access a vaccine myself by then but frankly hoping I've had it already!

Will check out those sources on costs.

Cheers
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Old 12-28-20, 04:16 PM
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Originally Posted by axolotl View Post
I highly recommend Spanish language schools. The cost is variable, mostly depending on the country you want to study in. It's easy to find the costs online. I attended language schools in Mexico & Costa Rica, both of which are more expensive countries than Ecuador. I did "homestays" each time, that is, living with a host family. Each country has its own version of Spanish. I have found the Spanish in Colombia, Ecuador, Costa Rica, & Mexico easy to understand. Chilean Spanish was the most difficult for me. Argentine & Uruguayan Spanish are heavily influenced by the substantial Italian immigration to both countries, but I still found it easier than Chilean Spanish. Also, touring costs are extremely variable in Latin America, once again depending on the country, and how you're living I've toured in multiple countries in Latin America but never camped there, so I can't help you with that. My most recent tour was in Colombia (note the spelling) in early 2019. Gorgeous country, friendly people, exhausting cycling, and fairly inexpensive if you've got western currency. Some parts of the country are quite safe (such as the "zona cafetera" where I was touring, and other parts of the country are not at all safe. Various government websites have information, along with guidebooks. My first tour in S. America was in Chile & northern Patagonia in Argentina. That region would be conducive to camping, though I stayed mainly in hospedajes (bed & breakfast). Stunning scenery. I was in Ecuador many years ago, but it sounds like quite a few things have changed since I was there.

I would hope that you're not considering this trip until Covid ceases to be a major issue. The situation is pretty dire in much of Latin America.
Thanks axolotl. I had not actually thought about variation in Spanish across countries - useful to know. Also hadn't thought about a homestay: nice idea.

Yes, would only be touring from sometime in 2022. Things are pretty bad re Covid where I am too.
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Old 12-28-20, 04:21 PM
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Originally Posted by gauvins View Post
If you are an academic (i.e. with PhD), depending on your field and vitae, I'd ask around for a visiting position -- RA/TA/lecturer -- or something like that. Perhaps not asking for a salary but some kind of stipend to cover housing and basic necessities. You may also/instead want to write a few emails to some faculties, telling them about your personal story and goals, and asking for suggestions. Perhaps start by creating a web page that would describe your African trip.

WRT writing on the road, just a thought: touring with a laptop is no fun for at least 2 reasons. Every day (1) you'll have to get near an outlet to recharge the battery; (2) you'll worry about theft. Well, actually, three reasons: (3) a laptop is bulky/heavy. You may want to experiment with a Moleskin and a pen, taking notes on the road rather than attempting complete a manuscript while on the move.

Great project. Have fun.
Thanks gauvins.

Yeah, the laptop thing is something I was going to ask about at a later stage. (Though I need to check for existing threads here, I'm sure it's been discussed). On my previous trip I did mu blogging by writing in notebooks and then typing up at internet cafes. Problem with academic writing is that one often needs bibliographic software, references, typesetting software, etc. It is possible to do a lot of that virtually, or carry it on a USB, but that would require quite a big change in my approach to work so would prefer to figure out a way to carry a laptop or equivalent.

Good suggestion re a visiting position. I know there are some departments in Colombia that might be a good match, not sure about elsewhere.

Cheers
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Old 12-28-20, 07:41 PM
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where do you live?
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Old 12-29-20, 08:59 AM
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Everyone is different, but here’s a few things that work for me:

I write with pencil on paper. Every day I take photos with my phone and mail them to myself as a back up.

I only work ”creatively” in the first few hours of the day. Depending on where I am in the process, I’ll have an old iPad and bluetooth keyboard with me to transcribe to (emailing daily backups as well) though this is just in ”notepad” format.

Back home, I do all the layout and formatting in Indesign on a desktop computer.

Then comes the editing, re-editing, and more editing (rinse and repeat) on computer screen, iPad (in pdf format), print outs and proof copies from the publisher as I find different mediums give different reading experiences.

Basically, I’m ”creative” on the road, and do the ”donkey work” at home.

Last edited by imi; 12-29-20 at 09:02 AM.
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Old 01-19-21, 07:53 PM
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My brother (John Otis, NPR & WSJ) is a journalist and cyclist, and lives in Colombia. I remember at the beginning of his career (1980's) he came and visited us in Mexico, and he was hiking through the Sierra Madre carrying a typewriter in his backpack. I don't think he actually got much writing done at that point, although we were all very impressed.
The great thing about Latin America is that with one language you can get around just about everywhere. Take advantage of this, you have lots of time, so take a Spanish course somewhere. If you speak only/mostly Spanish every day, after a few months you'll be able to talk about pretty much anything with anyone, and this will enrich your stay immeasurably.
As for cycling, South America is huge, and most of the northern part is either rugged mountains or sweltering jungle lowlands, which makes it seem even bigger. It's definitely adventure touring, and to cross the entire continent on a bike is a major undertaking in itself. I'm having a hard time imagining doing that plus doing serious research and writing at the same time, especially in the more isolated places. Not to say you can't do both, but I think it would be a lot easier to switch off between the two: do some biking, then some research and writing, then some more biking. When you find a nice place and a good situation, rent a house or a room for a couple weeks or a month. Staying put should help cut costs, plus you can figure out the internet better, you won't be exhausted from a day on the road, etc.
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Old 11-21-21, 07:00 AM
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Afro, you've gone awol on this.
rereading your posts, it's clear that you can express yourself well in writing, and you seem to be a naive English speaker, although I could be wrong about that.
If you see this message, have your plans evolved at all?
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Old 11-21-21, 05:18 PM
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I just stopped moving after trying to do a history masters and touring at the same time. It was doable, but not very fun either. It's a ton of reading and writing and it's just too draining to ride your bike all day, pick a wild camp, cook dinner, then have to worry about writing. I decided to take a month off the tour to finish up my final papers instead of trying to do them while touring. I did complete a decent amount of this semester while touring, but it wasn't great for either the touring experience or the grad school experience.
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