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Rim brake touring bikes extinct?

Old 03-11-21, 04:31 PM
  #26  
AeroGut
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Originally Posted by Nyah View Post
I checked for that on the Fuji USA site already but only saw the QR-disc version there.
There's only an image of the disc version, but the text says "Available in flat-mount disc or linear-pull brake versions."
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Old 03-11-21, 05:14 PM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by Nyah View Post
Apparently it does.
It exists and is a great bike. My parts hybrid is a Privateer frame and it has been fantastic over the years highly recommend it.

Rim brakes will be dead when Paul stops making them and eeBrakes stop existing until then rim brakes are still around even if a lot of folks are moving to discs (which is not a bad thing).
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Old 03-11-21, 05:46 PM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by tyrion View Post
If your bike breaks down in the middle of Kazakhstan it would be hard to find those exotic rim brake parts.
I really think that canti brakes are very unlikely to cause your breakdown. And it has to be pretty steep downhill to need both front and rear brakes.
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Old 03-11-21, 07:43 PM
  #29  
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Rodriguez Adventure comes with cantilever brakes.
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Old 03-11-21, 07:48 PM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by AeroGut View Post
I second the suggestion to look for used, maybe even vintage, depending on your preferences. Lots of great canti brake bikes out there in good condition and often underpriced precisely because they don’t have discs.

The Surly LHTs seem to still command a premium for some reason, but other comparable bikes often do not.

PS it looks like Fuji still sells their touring bike in a rim brake version if you want something new
Thanks. I'm actually fairly rich in that department. I have a '89 Miyata 618GT (next model down from the 1000) that took me cross-country; it takes a 35mm tire (maybe 38). And last year I picked up an almost never used Fuji Touring Series III on eBay. But neither of those bikes will haul a load without twitching like the Surly would, or take as big a tire. I've had my fill of "shimmy" bikes for loaded touring. But if I decided to go with a lighter kit or ditch camping altogether, I guess I'd be OK with what I've got.

Last edited by Fuji1986; 03-11-21 at 07:55 PM.
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Old 03-11-21, 08:39 PM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by Fuji1986 View Post
Thanks. I'm actually fairly rich in that department. I have a '89 Miyata 618GT (next model down from the 1000) that took me cross-country; it takes a 35mm tire (maybe 38). And last year I picked up an almost never used Fuji Touring Series III on eBay. But neither of those bikes will haul a load without twitching like the Surly would, or take as big a tire. I've had my fill of "shimmy" bikes for loaded touring. But if I decided to go with a lighter kit or ditch camping altogether, I guess I'd be OK with what I've got.
that's a pretty good assessment of older touring bikes, newer stuff is generally more composed.
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Old 03-11-21, 10:18 PM
  #32  
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Soma still makes the Pescadero and Grand Randonneur framesets.
Maybe check out the New Albion Privateer
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Old 03-12-21, 07:55 AM
  #33  
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I just picked up a LHT from Hoopdriver Bicycles in Toronto Canada. Last time I checked stock, they had a few 58 cm (26" wheel) LHTs (complete bikes though). His biggest LHT frame only was 54 cm unfortunately.

Martin is the owner there, he's a good dude to deal with.

I don't know if he'd ship international and getting over the boarder right now (if you are close enough) is not possible thanks to COVID. But if you want one bad enough perhaps you can make it happen.

Good luck.

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Old 03-12-21, 09:15 AM
  #34  
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https://www.ebay.com/itm/SOMA-FABRIC...cAAOSw~jlgPrKk
https://blackmtncycles.com/shop/fram...v5-5-frameset/

The first is a lightly used Soma Saga frame.
The second is technically a gravel/monstercross/doitall frame.

I have a Black Mountain MC frame that was built up for gravel riding for a handful of years and is now my touring/commuting bike. Its a 65cm size and there is no twisting or shimmy on it, so a smaller frame size shouldnt shimmy either.
There are proper mounting points for front and rear racks, 3 bottle mounts, you can fit up to a 50mm tire if you want, and the chainstays can be up to 450mm long. Its heat treated double butted 8/5/8 tubing and has a killer fork crown.
58 and 60 sizes are available in olive oil and 58 is available in bright blue.
I have set mine up with fenders and a rear rack in the past and currently have it set up with fenders and a front rack. Its stable either way.

As an added bonus, the guy who owns the brand, Mike, is really helpful and seems like someone who is doing good in this hobby. He has decades of experience with frame design and spec, and has run his own shop for the past 12 or so years.
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Old 03-12-21, 09:30 AM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by veganbikes View Post
It exists and is a great bike. My parts hybrid is a Privateer frame and it has been fantastic over the years highly recommend it.

Rim brakes will be dead when Paul stops making them and eeBrakes stop existing until then rim brakes are still around even if a lot of folks are moving to discs (which is not a bad thing).
So your threshold for when rim brakes will be dead is when a couple of boutique goofy expensive brakes are no longer made?
Shimano may still make Ultegra caliper rim brakes, TRP may still make long reach caliper rim brakes, Tektro may still make 710 and 720 brakes- but rim brakes are dead once CC no longer makes eeBrakes for the 6 people that buy them each year?

Your elitism becomes more difficult to mask by the day.
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Old 03-12-21, 09:49 AM
  #36  
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I read through all the posts to see if anyone recommended buying a vintage mountain bike frame as an option. If you can find a good rigid mtb frame in your size, you could build it up into a very capable touring bike.
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Old 03-12-21, 10:03 AM
  #37  
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I like the Black Mountain-- looks as strong as the Surly and not much more expensive. Seems to check all the boxes. Thanks for the recommendation.
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Old 03-12-21, 10:20 AM
  #38  
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Originally Posted by mtnbud View Post
I read through all the posts to see if anyone recommended buying a vintage mountain bike frame as an option. If you can find a good rigid mtb frame in your size, you could build it up into a very capable touring bike.
Those things are getting harder to find as time goes by. I have an 83 original stumpjumper, first generation mountain bike, that was used on the trails in the Canadian Rockies. I put dropped bars on it and toured several thousank kms in New Zealand. It was awesome.Then I used as a commuter, summer and winter for over 20 years. Now it is an ebike. Those were some of the most versatile bikes ever made.
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Old 03-12-21, 10:35 AM
  #39  
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Originally Posted by mtnbud View Post
I read through all the posts to see if anyone recommended buying a vintage mountain bike frame as an option. If you can find a good rigid mtb frame in your size, you could build it up into a very capable touring bike.
Yeah, I tried that about ten years ago with a Miyata Terra Runner. It definitely carried the load without whimpering, but man, it was slow. I also couldn't get enough upper-body extension even with the longer Dirt Drop stem I used. So I prefer 700c I guess.


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Old 03-12-21, 11:04 AM
  #40  
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Originally Posted by Fuji1986 View Post
I like the Black Mountain-- looks as strong as the Surly and not much more expensive. Seems to check all the boxes. Thanks for the recommendation.
Mike has blogged about how it isnt a touring frame, and I completely understand the owner of a brand saying that for liability/warranty, but clearly dont agree with it in practice. The frame has mounting points, has comfortable stable geometry, and has tubing that can handle weight. Its as much a touring frame as my old Fuji built touring frame from '90.
I will say that my frame was built with 9/6/9 top and down tubes since it was an early version of the largest size. All other sizes are 8/5/8 heat treated tubing for top and down tubes, so ever so slightly lighter and less stiff. At the same time, the frame size is smaller which will greatly offset the ever so slightly less stiff tubing since smaller triangles are stiffer. I mention this because I am guessing the LHT in your size is probably 9/6/9 or so. Whatever it is, its the same or thicker than the Black Mountain's tubing which simply means stiffer.
Just something to keep in mind.

In general, the stiffness talk is funny to me since I am 215# and with gear, thats 240-250# on the bike. I dont notice twist and flexing with this large diamond frame and high total weight, but others hate similar frames due to flex even though they are smaller and there is less overall weight. Preferences and what we notice is just interesting in general.
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Old 03-12-21, 04:41 PM
  #41  
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I would use a rim brake bike again, if the bike had steel wheels, so you didn't have to replace the rim after every 2 years. I can't justify, an alum. wheel, that wears away, and having to be replaced all the time. Steel wheels lasted forever, and if you keep it in good nick, wouldn't rust. But even if it did rust, it would still be working as it is intended 20 years later.
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Old 03-12-21, 05:05 PM
  #42  
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Originally Posted by ricrunner View Post
I would use a rim brake bike again, if the bike had steel wheels, so you didn't have to replace the rim after every 2 years. I can't justify, an alum. wheel, that wears away, and having to be replaced all the time. Steel wheels lasted forever, and if you keep it in good nick, wouldn't rust. But even if it did rust, it would still be working as it is intended 20 years later.
If you are talking about the chrome plated steel rims of a half century ago, in rain their braking capability was terrible.
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Old 03-12-21, 05:12 PM
  #43  
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I still have memories of braking in the rain with rims like that and the bike just kinda shrugging its shoulders and saying, "huhhh? You wanna slow down??"

and who has to change their rims every two years?
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Old 03-12-21, 05:46 PM
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Yeah, I have never completely wore out a rim brake track. I have noticeable wear on a couple rims, but still quite safe.

I build up my own wheels, so if I wore out a rim, I would complain a bit to myself, and then order a new rim to transfer the hub and spokes over to. Would have it done and all trued up in less than two hours of listening to some mindless tv show while enjoying some red wine.

A fried of mine that is a better mechanic than me thinks that his rims last much longer with Koolstop Salmon pads, I am slowly changing most of my bikes over to those pads. I hope he is right.

But, I do not commute on a bike in bad conditions, if I did I am sure my rims would have a shorter life.
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Old 03-12-21, 07:52 PM
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Originally Posted by ricrunner View Post
I would use a rim brake bike again, if the bike had steel wheels, so you didn't have to replace the rim after every 2 years. I can't justify, an alum. wheel, that wears away, and having to be replaced all the time. Steel wheels lasted forever, and if you keep it in good nick, wouldn't rust. But even if it did rust, it would still be working as it is intended 20 years later.
...or just spend $160 every 2 years(in reality, the average is much higher) and buy a couple new quality aluminum rims. Wild idea, I know.
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Old 03-12-21, 07:57 PM
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My Speedwell, lasted 40 years, a little bit of rust on the bike. The brakes were okay. I was not riding at 60km an hour, so didn't need to stop that hard. The only bad thing about that bike was it was stolen on a tour, otherwise today, another 15 years later, I would still be using it.
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Old 03-12-21, 07:58 PM
  #47  
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really, the worst case scenario for rim brakes is riding loaded on big downhills, on a wet dirt, gritty road where you just have no choice but to brake a lot.
I find commuting easy, rim life wise, just cuz if I ride in the rain, 1- Im not fully loaded riding down mountains, and 2- when I get home, I always wipe the rims with a rag and get all that accumulated gunk off right away before it dries, and do the same to the pads.
Makes a huge difference to helping rim life.
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Old 03-12-21, 11:31 PM
  #48  
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Originally Posted by ricrunner View Post
I would use a rim brake bike again, if the bike had steel wheels, so you didn't have to replace the rim after every 2 years. I can't justify, an alum. wheel, that wears away, and having to be replaced all the time. Steel wheels lasted forever, and if you keep it in good nick, wouldn't rust. But even if it did rust, it would still be working as it is intended 20 years later.
My wife's touring bike has just gone over 25,000 miles (10 years) on the original rims; and she runs linear brakes, which are harder on the rims. I've used cantilever brakes for a long time and my aluminum alloy rims are still in good shape. My oldest aluminum alloy wheels are 19 years old with a lot of hard miles on them. At my age I doubt if I'll ever have to change them

IMO opinion and experience based on using steel rims when I was a kid is that they have less stopping power, especially when wet, than alloy rims. Changing a rim at 25,000+ miles is a small price to pay. We also use KoolStop Salmon brake pads on all our bikes.

A wheel's useful life should be measured in miles not years.

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Old 03-13-21, 02:54 AM
  #49  
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Originally Posted by djb View Post
really, the worst case scenario for rim brakes is riding loaded on big downhills, on a wet dirt, gritty road where you just have no choice but to brake a lot.
I find commuting easy, rim life wise, just cuz if I ride in the rain, 1- Im not fully loaded riding down mountains, and 2- when I get home, I always wipe the rims with a rag and get all that accumulated gunk off right away before it dries, and do the same to the pads.
Makes a huge difference to helping rim life.
This scenario has killed more than a few disc setups too. When the pads are gone and you are out of spares, it is not easy to walk a loaded bike downhill.
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Old 03-13-21, 07:05 AM
  #50  
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I did not put new pads on my bike before I rode Pacific Coast, but i was surprised how many times each day I would have an 8 percent downhill grade followed by the uphill for a couple hundred feet of elevation every time I passed another creek flowing to the ocean. I brought one spare set of pads for one wheel in my spares bag, but did not get to the point where I needed them.

At the end of the trip, I am sure that there was more wear on the rims, but I could not see it or feel it when rubbing my fingers on the brake track.

But the pads were toast at the end of that trip.



The grooves between the blocks were gone, but during the last half of that trip we never got any rain so the lack of the grooves did not impair braking. Every few weeks on that trip I would inspect the pads and clean them a bit, dig any debris out of the pads, etc.



This was the trip I had a bike with bad shimmy and defective frame that Surly refused to warranty. Thus I used a lot more brake pad than I otherwise might have used because I had to brake harder to keep speed lower on descents. The bike frame went into the metal recycling bin when I got home. That was seven years ago. The rear wheel from that trip is still in use on my rando bike. Still have the front wheel but that wheel lacks a dynohub and is in semi-retirement.
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