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Touring eh? You’re going to need a pasty!

Old 05-18-22, 11:47 AM
  #26  
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Originally Posted by indyfabz View Post

V/S





I'll go for the eatable type...

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Old 05-18-22, 12:03 PM
  #27  
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Here in Montreal, I've seen either Chilean or argentinian places sell the same thing , but I forget what they call them.
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Old 05-18-22, 01:31 PM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by djb View Post
Interesting, once again we've had very similar experiences. I spent a few days in Pachuca, neat city to visit and yummy pastys indeed.
Did you happen to stumble upon the photography museum there? Excellent place, and I was really impressed by the guide who was taking a group of school kids through it--both for her great explanation of the film photography process, as well as showing them photos on the wall and getting them to think of how a great photo transmits feelings and experiences to us (these were 10, 12 year olds)
Fond memories of the place.
Cheers
Are you still doing what you wrote me of a few years back, I am.
(Apologies for not responding btw)

I don't recall a photography museum there. I was there about 6 years ago. The zocalo was mostly closed off due to construction.

Were you touring in Hidalgo? It's pretty mountainous. I wasn't touring there. We arrived by bus from El Tajin, an archeological site in northern Veracruz state near Papantla. The new road from Papantla to Hidalgo had stunning scenery.

A year ago, I read a novel titled "Mexican Gothic" by Silvia-Moreno-Garcia. She is from Mexico, and I believe lives in Vancouver now. She wrote the novel in English. Real del Monte (which has an English cemetery) was the basis for the village in the novel. To be honest, I don't like that genre of fiction, and this book did not change that.

Yup, I'm still doing what I was doing.


Originally Posted by djb View Post
Here in Montreal, I've seen either Chilean or argentinian places sell the same thing , but I forget what they call them.
Empanadas. Both countries make them, but the size is very different in each country. I think the Chilean ones are the big ones.
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Old 05-18-22, 04:07 PM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by axolotl View Post
I don't recall a photography museum there. I was there about 6 years ago. The zocalo was mostly closed off due to construction.

Were you touring in Hidalgo? It's pretty mountainous. I wasn't touring there. We arrived by bus from El Tajin, an archeological site in northern Veracruz state near Papantla. The new road from Papantla to Hidalgo had stunning scenery.

A year ago, I read a novel titled "Mexican Gothic" by Silvia-Moreno-Garcia. She is from Mexico, and I believe lives in Vancouver now. She wrote the novel in English. Real del Monte (which has an English cemetery) was the basis for the village in the novel. To be honest, I don't like that genre of fiction, and this book did not change that.

Empanadas. Both countries make them, but the size is very different in each country. I think the Chilean ones are the big ones.
I was in Pachuca I think in 2018, and I think I read about the museo de la fotografia somewhere and went walking and found it (was closed the day I went actually, but went back the next day)
I don't think it was new, in fact the super friendly (and very very short) Indio lady tour guide told me that she had worked there a good long time, 15, 20 years at least I believe, now that I recall more--so I believe their photo collection and museum have been there a long while. I spoke to the director for a few minutes to tell her also how impressed I was with the place, and how well the guided tour gave such a good overview of photography in general, and the aesthetic angle too.

I was touring in the area ish, I started in Oaxaca and made my way up to Leon, but took a wide berth around Mexico City, hence running into Pachuca. I like riding in mountainous areas, but we also hit a lot of biiiiiiiiiiiig open plain areas in central Mexico, which I found pretty darn cool also to ride through. Pachuca from memory wasnt that bad to ride into and out of, nothing compared to other cities.
I really liked seeing different parts of Mexico, and would love to return to tour again in some other areas. So many places to see , but also as you know, often family and stuff obligations. Good excuse though to stay in shape, hopefully still able physically to do this stuff as we age more and more, year by year.

will look up Mexican Gothic, curious now.
thanks
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Old 05-18-22, 05:50 PM
  #30  
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Empanadas?
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Old 05-18-22, 06:00 PM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by Pratt View Post
Empanadas?
Ya, you know , that hip Brazilian 60s tune, "The girl from Empanada"
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Old 05-18-22, 06:20 PM
  #32  
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She was probably wearing pasties.
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Old 05-18-22, 07:37 PM
  #33  
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Pasties are really common in NZ and Australia as well. There's a bakery in almost every town that does meat pies, sausage rolls and pasties, in addition to bread and cake type things. You get cheaper/worse versions from service stations, the Aussie version of a hotdog I guess. A pastie is sort of an interesting variation, where you have one every so often, as opposed to the regularity of pies. Still, for the mioners, I do believe they used to be baked with the meat/vegetable filling in the larger part, but with a smaller dessert section of fruit filling walled off with pastry in one corner, that would be eaten towards.
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Old 05-18-22, 07:44 PM
  #34  
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Originally Posted by PDKL45 View Post
Pasties are really common in NZ and Australia as well. There's a bakery in almost every town that does meat pies, sausage rolls and pasties, in addition to bread and cake type things. You get cheaper/worse versions from service stations, the Aussie version of a hotdog I guess. A pastie is sort of an interesting variation, where you have one every so often, as opposed to the regularity of pies. Still, for the mioners, I do believe they used to be baked with the meat/vegetable filling in the larger part, but with a smaller dessert section of fruit filling walled off with pastry in one corner, that would be eaten towards.
Yep, a bit of fruit filling at one end. The baker would mark that end somehow, so you don't accidentally start with dessert.

In families squeamish about the proper name (like mine), they were simply called hand pies.

I'd also heard Cornish miners spread them around the world, as they emigrated for jobs.
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Old 05-18-22, 07:51 PM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by djb View Post

I was touring in the area ish, I started in Oaxaca and made my way up to Leon, but took a wide berth around Mexico City, hence running into Pachuca. I like riding in mountainous areas, but we also hit a lot of biiiiiiiiiiiig open plain areas in central Mexico, which I found pretty darn cool also to ride through. Pachuca from memory wasnt that bad to ride into and out of, nothing compared to other cities.
I really liked seeing different parts of Mexico, and would love to return to tour again in some other areas. So many places to see , but also as you know, often family and stuff obligations. Good excuse though to stay in shape, hopefully still able physically to do this stuff as we age more and more, year by year.
I'm curious if the "biiiiiiiiig open plain areas in central Mexico" were in Puebla state? I recall that there are some pretty desert landscapes south of the city of Puebla on the way to Oaxaca. There's a very cool UNESCO world biosphere in southern Puebla/northern Oaxaca with a massive concentration of vertical cacti.
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Old 05-18-22, 07:53 PM
  #36  
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Originally Posted by djb View Post
Ya, you know , that hip Brazilian 60s tune, "The girl from Empanada"
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Old 05-18-22, 08:01 PM
  #37  
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Originally Posted by axolotl View Post
I'm curious if the "biiiiiiiiig open plain areas in central Mexico" were in Puebla state? I recall that there are some pretty desert landscapes south of the city of Puebla on the way to Oaxaca. There's a very cool UNESCO world biosphere in southern Puebla/northern Oaxaca with a massive concentration of vertical cacti.
Probably, will have to check when I'm back home if they wear in Puebla.
And I might have ridden through the cactus area, although I suspect there are numerous similar places.
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Old 05-18-22, 08:02 PM
  #38  
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Originally Posted by indyfabz View Post
Hay carumba Indy, that made me chuckle.
Obrigado
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Old 05-18-22, 08:14 PM
  #39  
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Cactus area. You can't really tell in this shot, but most of what you can see, even far off, are cacti cacti and more cacti.
Doesn't really give the feeling, but it was pretty damn cool in real life seeing this and realizing, holy crap, it's all cactus!

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Old 05-19-22, 08:18 AM
  #40  
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That 1st photo looks like the biosphere area. Further north in Puebla state, the landscape was flatter and the desert flora was more diverse.

There's a road from Zacatecas to San Luis Potosi which has the most amazing array of cacti I've ever seen. Mexico has more species of cacti than any other country.
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Old 05-19-22, 09:23 AM
  #41  
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Originally Posted by robow View Post
Stuart, the next time I'm out that way, I'll demand my touring buddy from Arvada take me down there for a western pasty. Thanks
You need to visit Tocabe’ (Indian tacos) in the same neighborhood, Chubbies for a Mexican hamburger, Highland’s Tap for pork rinds (so fresh they are still crackling), and Hops and Pie for an artisan pizza that changes every month. And that only scratches the surface of restaurants in my neighborhood.
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Old 05-19-22, 02:26 PM
  #42  
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Ax, ya the cacti area was near Tehaucan, and I saw from my journal that we passed from Oaxaca state into Puebla state that day.
like I said before, I'd love to return to Mexico and explore some other non touristy places.
One other memory of Pachuca, I'm pretty certain that I never saw another gringo while there. Nice traveling in non touristy places. When I got to San Miguel de Allende, holy kajeepers, elderly gringo central ! And lots of Mexican tourists too, just such a shock after being in little towns and villages nearly all the time.
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Old 05-19-22, 06:58 PM
  #43  
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Headed for Green Bay, Wisconsin The little guys were guarding the pasty shop.
Lunch




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Old 05-20-22, 06:29 AM
  #44  
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Apparently, there are variations of similar theme in other places as well - https://thetakeout.com/hand-pies-aro...s-t-1839895574

Meanwhile there are subtle differences between empanadas, pastys and pastes - https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paste_(pasty), e.g. dough used and whether meat is cooked before being wrapped...
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Old 05-20-22, 10:11 AM
  #45  
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Originally Posted by mev View Post
Apparently, there are variations of similar theme in other places as well - https://thetakeout.com/hand-pies-aro...s-t-1839895574
That is a fun article with one minor error, and 2 glaring omissions. The minor error is attributing cayenne pepper to Africa. All chile pepper species are endemic to the Americas, though now popular throughout the world, especially in tropical countries.

2 glaring omissions in the article are the Italian calzone, and the Central American pupusa, though the latter can be a bit messy to eat with the hands. The food in Central America is mostly pretty dull compared to Mexican cooking, but the pupusa is a sublime invention! Where I live, the Central American immigrant population is large, so it's easy for me to get my pupusa fix.
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Old 06-11-22, 06:33 PM
  #46  
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Old 06-25-22, 06:04 PM
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California also had an influx of Cornish miners who brought pasties with them in 1849. Still available today in what we call the Gold Country.

https://comstocksmag.com/web-only/ho...got-california

But Grass Valley is not just a run down tourist town, it’s also home to the GVG, a world leader in video equipment of all sorts. (Grass Valley Group).
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