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Tubus bike racks, rust?

Old 05-27-22, 05:13 AM
  #51  
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Just ordered the Tubus Grand Tour rack. 130 EUR is not too bad since I expect to use it for a long time.

The idea is to use the gravel bike as a touring bike on multi-day trips. Kind of a do-it-all bike. I might put a front rack on it as well.

The main factor was that I liked the design of it more than other racks, in terms of how I can adjust the panniers fore/aft, and the way the load on top would not be restricted. Also, it has the top bed narrower than most, and the panniers sit "angled inwards" which should improve bike handling with heavy panniers.

Thanks again for all the feedback.
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Old 05-27-22, 05:27 AM
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Originally Posted by maartendc View Post
The main factor was that I liked the design of it more than other racks, in terms of how I can adjust the panniers fore/aft, and the way the load on top would not be restricted. Also, it has the top bed narrower than most, and the panniers sit "angled inwards" which should improve bike handling with heavy panniers.
.
Some like a wider platform on top. I like to keep it narrow. I figure why have the load wider than necessary? Panniers aren't going to be aero but having them in tighter to the centerline of the bike has to help a little. I like the Axiom DLX Streamliner Rack for that reason. It keeps the whole load a good bit narrower.
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Old 05-27-22, 08:35 AM
  #53  
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Originally Posted by maartendc View Post
Just ordered the Tubus Grand Tour rack. 130 EUR is not too bad since I expect to use it for a long time.
....
You should be happy with it. It looks very similar to the Logo EVO that I have been using for a decade.
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Old 05-28-22, 04:42 AM
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Originally Posted by staehpj1 View Post
Some like a wider platform on top. I like to keep it narrow. I figure why have the load wider than necessary? Panniers aren't going to be aero but having them in tighter to the centerline of the bike has to help a little. I like the Axiom DLX Streamliner Rack for that reason. It keeps the whole load a good bit narrower.
Exactly, hadnt even thought about aerodynamics, good call. I just know that when I load up my Ortlieb Panniers to the brim on a grocery trip with my town bike, they tend to sway quite a lot and my bike gets top heavy and handling gets terrible. I can see how the load sitting lower and more centered would help this a lot.

Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN View Post
You should be happy with it. It looks very similar to the Logo EVO that I have been using for a decade.
Yes, they are very similar, just slightly different design. The Logo Evo was sold out everywhere, has been for a while it seems. The Grand Tour was really the only Tubus rack available from several online retailers.
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Old 05-28-22, 05:51 AM
  #55  
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Originally Posted by maartendc View Post
Exactly, hadnt even thought about aerodynamics, good call. I just know that when I load up my Ortlieb Panniers to the brim on a grocery trip with my town bike, they tend to sway quite a lot and my bike gets top heavy and handling gets terrible. I can see how the load sitting lower and more centered would help this a lot.

Yes, they are very similar, just slightly different design. The Logo Evo was sold out everywhere, has been for a while it seems. The Grand Tour was really the only Tubus rack available from several online retailers.
The lower down aspect is something that I notice, and partly why I got this rack. As you've seen, there are also aluminum models with similar lower pannier rails.
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Old 05-28-22, 06:04 AM
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Originally Posted by maartendc View Post
Exactly, hadnt even thought about aerodynamics, good call. I just know that when I load up my Ortlieb Panniers to the brim on a grocery trip with my town bike, they tend to sway quite a lot and my bike gets top heavy and handling gets terrible. I can see how the load sitting lower and more centered would help this a lot.
....
I try to put the most dense stuff in the bottom of the panniers, least dense stuff on top. Thus, my tools are in the bottom. Clothing, sleeping bag and other light stuff is on top.

I think the biggest advantage to the narrow top of the Logo EVO or Grand Tour is that the rack is much stiffer. When you look at the rack from the rear (middle graphic), to have any side to side flex would require that the top of the rack bends a lot.
https://www.tubus.com/fileadmin/user...our_3.0_01.pdf

Or the Logo EVO that I have.
https://www.tubus.com/fileadmin/user...Evo_TZ_2.0.pdf

Racks that have parallel sides, such as the Surly Nice rack that has a wide platform have a much less stiff design as the top does not need to bend much for a significant side to side movement. Initially I used a Surly rack for touring, switched to the Logo a decade ago, as the Logo only weighs half as much as the Surly but it is stiffer.

If you need to stow more on top, it is very easy with an elastic net to strap on a dry bag on top so that it sits on the two panniers. This works best if both panniers have an equal volume so they are the same height.

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Old 07-02-22, 08:00 PM
  #57  
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Originally Posted by robow View Post
So you come out of some cafe only to find your frame still locked up and panniers sitting neatly on the ground but your rear rack is missing, the hallmark of a thief well educated in metallurgy.
I'm just reading through this, and thinking there'd be a price-point where it would make sense to use "security bolts", and add a 5mm hex "security bit" and driver to my kit.


fwiw, I don't consider myself a high-mileage biker. I do 99% of my local transportation via biking and walking. Nonetheless, through "normal wear and tear" (whatever that means) I've managed to destroy two of Topeak's "toughest" Super Tourist DX racks; they've lasted a little over 5 years, on average. Both of them failed just above where they mount near the rear wheel. I live close enough to the ocean that salt is a concern with steel racks; not sure if it's an issue, but it is a concern. If price wasn't a factor, I'd go straight to stainless, and have them painted black by an auto-body shop; they use baked-on paints that are much tougher than anything I could apply. I'm not sure how titanium is suited for racks, compared to aluminum or steel, but I'll probably be going with aluminum or steel, and finding this thread helpful.
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Old 07-02-22, 08:15 PM
  #58  
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Old 07-03-22, 05:21 AM
  #59  
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Originally Posted by smasha View Post
I'm just reading through this, and thinking there'd be a price-point where it would make sense to use "security bolts", and add a 5mm hex "security bit" and driver to my kit.
...
The thieves in my area are mostly opportunists. The nicest looking bike that is also the easiest one to steal is the one that goes missing. But, I am basing that on living near a major university campus. There are some thefts of the higher end bikes but you see very few higher end bikes on campus. Many if not most of the bikes are decades old.

A neighbor is a bike mechanic, works at a bike shop on campus. He said that a couple decades ago when higher end brifters were rare, high priced, and every weekend roadie wanted the latest, that there was a string of burglaries where the thief would use a cable cutter, cut off all cables near the levers, remove the stem cap, loosen the two stem bolts and steal the handlebar/stem/brifters off of the higher end bikes. It probably took less than two minutes, if a short stem cap bolt was used it might have taken less than a minute to get some expensive parts.

But that is the only time I can think of that a security bolt like you cited would have actually prevented a theft, in the case I cited if you used that on the stem cap bolt. It is rare when I hear of something attached to a bike with several bolts being stolen instead of the entire bike.

When touring, I use bolt on skewers instead of quick release, as I am assuming the thief it an opportunist without a 5mm allen wrench in their pocket and my front wheel is often not protected with my lock. But I am most certain I would lose the special key if I used a skewer like the Pitlock. Thus, I only use the common bolt on skewers that any 5mm allen wrench will work on, keep a spare 5mm wrench with my spare tube to make sure I do not get stranded by a flat.
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Old 07-03-22, 05:44 AM
  #60  
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I have a cheaper axiom aluminum rack on my current main bike for over 10 years and it has done fine. Granted most of it's time is for commuting, errands, and shorter weekend/3-4 day trips. It was available at my LBS when I was finishing out my bike. I ended up ordering a tubus tara for front rack, planning on upgrading to tubus cargo in the back, but havent' really been pressed for the need to do it yet, as the axiom is working fine for my current needs - has a flat top, and carries loaded panniers well - some really heave (my full arkel shoppers can get heavy after I throw a 12 pack on top of the rack). Granted if I were going on an extended tour and depending on that bit of equipment - It may encourage me to upgrade
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Old 07-04-22, 11:11 AM
  #61  
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Originally Posted by maartendc View Post
Just ordered the Tubus Grand Tour rack. 130 EUR is not too bad since I expect to use it for a long time.

The idea is to use the gravel bike as a touring bike on multi-day trips. Kind of a do-it-all bike. I might put a front rack on it as well.

The main factor was that I liked the design of it more than other racks, in terms of how I can adjust the panniers fore/aft, and the way the load on top would not be restricted. Also, it has the top bed narrower than most, and the panniers sit "angled inwards" which should improve bike handling with heavy panniers.

Thanks again for all the feedback.
Those are all good points. They are smartly designed. Another reason that informed my choice for Tubus is that they can be repaired just about anywhere in the world. Welding rigs that can weld steel are a lot more common than those that can weld aluminum.
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Old 07-04-22, 06:58 PM
  #62  
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Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN View Post
When touring, I use bolt on skewers instead of quick release, as I am assuming the thief it an opportunist without a 5mm allen wrench in their pocket and my front wheel is often not protected with my lock. But I am most certain I would lose the special key if I used a skewer like the Pitlock. Thus, I only use the common bolt on skewers that any 5mm allen wrench will work on, keep a spare 5mm wrench with my spare tube to make sure I do not get stranded by a flat.
I've got those hex-key-skewers on my commuter. In terms of both price and practicality, they seem like a good compromise between quick-release and "high security" skewers.

I've been trying to find some for the new bike, but it seems like they've fallen out of fashion. I can't find any shops that carry them.
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Old 07-05-22, 04:14 AM
  #63  
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Originally Posted by smasha View Post
I've got those hex-key-skewers on my commuter. In terms of both price and practicality, they seem like a good compromise between quick-release and "high security" skewers.

I've been trying to find some for the new bike, but it seems like they've fallen out of fashion. I can't find any shops that carry them.
Have you tried Amazon or other on line shops? I got my last set at Amazon. But some of the Amazon ones have a five sided key, not hex, look for the word hex.

Some are more oriented towards road bikes with 130mm rear dropout spacing, others 135mm for mountain bikes or touring bikes. Halo brand comes in two sizes. The Halo ones only have one spring, there is a tab on one end that goes into the slot and you have to be careful to put that tab in the slot, otherwise if you are not careful you could bend that tab off. I think all others have two springs.

I think that things associated with conventional (not thru axle) wheels are getting harder to find, just like 36 spoke rims or hubs for rim brakes are getting hard to find.
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Old 07-06-22, 05:04 AM
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Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN View Post
Have you tried Amazon or other on line shops? I got my last set at Amazon. But some of the Amazon ones have a five sided key, not hex, look for the word hex.

Some are more oriented towards road bikes with 130mm rear dropout spacing, others 135mm for mountain bikes or touring bikes. Halo brand comes in two sizes. The Halo ones only have one spring, there is a tab on one end that goes into the slot and you have to be careful to put that tab in the slot, otherwise if you are not careful you could bend that tab off. I think all others have two springs.

I think that things associated with conventional (not thru axle) wheels are getting harder to find, just like 36 spoke rims or hubs for rim brakes are getting hard to find.
Politics aside, shipping from Amazon to NZ makes it not such a good deal, but I'll keep that in mind as an option.

Yeah, I've got Halos on my old commuter, but after 10+ years, I'm thinking it's time to get new ones, for the new bike.

And yeah, "legacy" QR axles/skewers are probably on the way out. I was hoping that this years model of my new commuter bike with have thru-axles, but it's QR. In another ten years, that'll be part of why I want/need to upgrade.
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Old 07-06-22, 05:49 AM
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Originally Posted by smasha View Post
Politics aside, shipping from Amazon to NZ makes it not such a good deal, ...

And yeah, "legacy" QR axles/skewers are probably on the way out. ....
I did not notice you are in NZ. Oops.

I am hoping I do not need to replace a bike, I have several with quick release, etc. One of my neighbors is a bike mechanic, he was admiring one of mine. I said that it was the last version of that model frame that used rim brakes and quick release. He said that now he regrets not stocking up on those frames when they were available. But I must admit I am somewhat shocked how fast through axles replaced conventional hubs.

I built up another dynohub wheel last year, considered future proofing it by buying a through axle version, plus the quick release adapter for it, but the cost was much higher so I stayed with a normal hub.
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Old 07-06-22, 06:58 AM
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Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN View Post
I did not notice you are in NZ. Oops.

I am hoping I do not need to replace a bike, I have several with quick release, etc. One of my neighbors is a bike mechanic, he was admiring one of mine. I said that it was the last version of that model frame that used rim brakes and quick release. He said that now he regrets not stocking up on those frames when they were available. But I must admit I am somewhat shocked how fast through axles replaced conventional hubs.

I built up another dynohub wheel last year, considered future proofing it by buying a through axle version, plus the quick release adapter for it, but the cost was much higher so I stayed with a normal hub.
People are often shocked to learn that there's no Amazon warehouse in NZ.

I suspect the fast move from QR to thru-axles is in no small part because of liability/insurance. This is especially relevant with suspension forks. Today I stopped by the shop that's putting together my new bike; they've got over a hundred bikes on the showroom floor, and no more than 2-3 had solid forks. That said, about 5 years ago I bought my kid a new solid-fork commuter bike, and that had thru-axles; now I'm buying a more expensive solid-fork bike for myself, and it's got QRs.

Rohloff, and other internal geared hubs, are going to be another thing that's left in a weird spot, with the industry quickly moving from QR to thru-axle.
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Old 07-06-22, 07:32 AM
  #67  
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Originally Posted by smasha View Post
...I suspect the fast move from QR to thru-axles is in no small part because of liability/insurance. ...

Rohloff, and other internal geared hubs, are going to be another thing that's left in a weird spot, with the industry quickly moving from QR to thru-axle.
I agree, a lot of people did not tighten the skewers enough and braking could shift the position of the hub in the dropouts.

And some people never learned that the lever on a quick release is a cam operated tightener, they thought that the lever was just a lever so you did not need a wrench. I saw one of my co-workers tighten her quick release that way, which really surprised me. She was smart, was a scientist with a masters degree, yet nobody ever told her how the skewer works and she just assumed she knew.

My Lynskey came with replaceable dropouts, either through axle or conventional quick release, I have the quick release on it. That frame was made that way five years ago. But that brake unit is on the chain stay, not seat stay, so the axle does not try to shift position when braking because of the way the forces are oriented.

I assume that Rohloff is trying to come up with a new way do to it. But Rohoff has another problem, the non-drive side of their hubs often weep oil and oil can contaminate a rotor and pads. My Rohloff is on a rim brake bike, not an issue for me.

But on the other hand, many if not most Rohoffs are installed on a frame that was designed in part to allow a Rohloff to be used. So, maybe they are not bothering to change, as what they have works fine and frame builders will probably keep making frames that it works on. My Rohloff frame does not even have a derailleur hanger, it is designed to be a Rohloff specific frame.
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Old 07-06-22, 04:37 PM
  #68  
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Originally Posted by Brett A View Post
Those are all good points. They are smartly designed. Another reason that informed my choice for Tubus is that they can be repaired just about anywhere in the world. Welding rigs that can weld steel are a lot more common than those that can weld aluminum.
I don't think that's accurate nowadays. Aluminum is everywhere now, so even remote areas can weld it well. A car backed into my bike and cracked my aluminum rack. I thought I was screwed but my hotel guy brought me to a guy who welded it back together. This was in quite a remote area.
Another time I was in Kyrgyzstan doing the old silk road, and fell. The rack cracked and I was led to a lady who welded it together in an hour!

Originally Posted by staehpj1 View Post
I haven't broken any of my "cheap" racks. Some certainly have well over 10k miles, but I don't keep track. I have run a variety of racks because they have been on a variety of bikes and carried a variety of loads. If they were all tubus I'd easily have spent $1000 in racks by now. Rat wouldn't be the end of the world, but on the other hand, all of the racks I have used have served well and none have failed. I especially liked the axiom streamliner, but it hasn't suited the bike and load on recent trips so it hasn't been used in ages.

My usage case probably isn't typical though. If I had bought one set of racks for a standard touring bike and toured with regular panniers from then on a set of tubus racks would have not been that big of an investment. Not a necessity, but not crazy over the top either.
I use the Axiom Streamliner 29er on my bikes for a while now and they are awesome. They allow the rack to be mounted 8 cm off the mount points, which allowed more space for longer bags. They are really nice.
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Old 07-06-22, 05:37 PM
  #69  
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Originally Posted by Sardines View Post
I use the Axiom Streamliner 29er on my bikes for a while now and they are awesome. They allow the rack to be mounted 8 cm off the mount points, which allowed more space for longer bags. They are really nice.
I have a streamliner and really like it too. I no longer have the bike it was on, but liked the rack so well that I kept it.
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