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Fenders for my 55mm x 700c tires ?

Old 06-08-22, 05:21 PM
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Originally Posted by djb View Post
Seems to me that you really don't have the room for fenders, going from the little I can see in side photo and your comment on toe overlap
My 26inch touring bike, surly troll, has the advantage of tons of room for up to 2.6 or 2.8 inch tires, but also for not having any toe strike even with my fenders set up with ample mud clearance space between tires and fenders.

My commuter with fenders and 700, and platform pedals has a bit of toe strike at times, but it doesn't cause a problem.
An old bike I had one with fenders had bad toe fender overlap and when it was brand new, within a block of the bike store, my foot hit the front fender, jamming it in the wheel and bending the fender into the front tire, folding the fender up, ruining it-- so do be wary, toe fender strike can be slightly annoying or can fold the fender under the wheel if fender is flexible enough.

Ps, I just put my 2inch ( 50mm) slicks back on my bike and use about 35 psi in them. Pressures slightly higher with loaded panniers.
I do only weigh 135.
Just watch pressures on these 55mm tires, over inflating defeats the purpose and ride experience.
What pressures are you trying, what is body weight?
I'm about 190 so maybe 200 lbs fully clothed, etc. I think they are at about 45 psi at the moment, but that was to make sure they seated properly. They roll fine but I think I can go a bit lower.

In retrospect, I think 650b wheels might work better. These are "borrowed" from another bike that really didn't need 3 wheel-sets, and I can see where having a dynamo hub could be nice.
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Old 06-08-22, 07:37 PM
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On my bike with 57mm wide tires, I run 45 psi rear and 35 up front when on an unladen bike. I weigh about 180 plus or minus 5 pounds. More pressure if loaded for touring, maybe up to 55 in rear with a heavy load.
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Old 06-08-22, 10:24 PM
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Originally Posted by Polaris OBark View Post
I'm about 190 so maybe 200 lbs fully clothed, etc. I think they are at about 45 psi at the moment, but that was to make sure they seated properly. They roll fine but I think I can go a bit lower.

In retrospect, I think 650b wheels might work better. These are "borrowed" from another bike that really didn't need 3 wheel-sets, and I can see where having a dynamo hub could be nice.
I find it is interesting to try different pressures with varying load weight, or not, and seeing how the ride is at different pressures. The main thing with wider tires like yours is taking advantage of how well they ride over bumpy stuff, and or looser surfaces too.

Have fun experimenting.
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Old 06-08-22, 10:54 PM
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Here is what the Rene Herse website says for these tires:


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Old 06-09-22, 03:05 AM
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Originally Posted by Polaris OBark View Post
Here is what the Rene Herse website says for these tires:


I am really surprised that they would say the same pressure in front as in rear. That company used to promote what they called the "15 percent tire drop", that looked at how much weight you had on each tire. I often ran higher pressures than they suggested, I treated their 15 percent as a minimum. Their suggestions maxed out at 37mm tire width, which was about the widest that most 700c bikes could take at that time. But I felt that their calculation had way too little pressure in the front wheel so I ran a much higher pressure. Later they changed their theory on front and suggested higher pressure was needed for braking, as braking would shift some of your weight to the front wheel. This article is before they suggested to raise the pressure higher in the front tire.
https://www.adventurecycling.org/def...SIRX_Heine.pdf

I typically run the front at about two thirds to three fourths as much pressure as I have in the rear. There was one exception, in West Texas I was on some really rough chip seal for a week and I dropped my front pressure to maybe 55 percent as much as I had in the rear to reduce the vibration in my handlebars.
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Old 06-09-22, 04:14 AM
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Re wide tires and rough roads-- I've shown this photo a bunch of times, but I was so glad to have wider tires (45-50mm) similar to the RH stuff when I did some long trips 4, 5 years ago.

This chipseal road in mid Mexico was the worst chipseal I've ridden on, and wider tires at proper pressures saved my hands that day.

And then there are sandy loose surface roads too.


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Old 06-09-22, 07:48 AM
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Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN View Post
I am really surprised that they would say the same pressure in front as in rear. That company used to promote what they called the "15 percent tire drop", that looked at how much weight you had on each tire. I often ran higher pressures than they suggested, I treated their 15 percent as a minimum. Their suggestions maxed out at 37mm tire width, which was about the widest that most 700c bikes could take at that time. But I felt that their calculation had way too little pressure in the front wheel so I ran a much higher pressure. Later they changed their theory on front and suggested higher pressure was needed for braking, as braking would shift some of your weight to the front wheel. This article is before they suggested to raise the pressure higher in the front tire.
https://www.adventurecycling.org/def...SIRX_Heine.pdf

I typically run the front at about two thirds to three fourths as much pressure as I have in the rear. There was one exception, in West Texas I was on some really rough chip seal for a week and I dropped my front pressure to maybe 55 percent as much as I had in the rear to reduce the vibration in my handlebars.
I think braking shifts almost all of the weight upon the front wheel, which is why about 80% of braking power comes from the front. Also, have you seen how Jan loads a bike up? Two huge low-riding front panniers.

Having said that, I typically use the Silca tire pressure calculator as a guide.
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Old 06-09-22, 07:59 AM
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Here is the Silca Tire Pressure calculator results for 55mm tires and the same combined weight of 260lbs (I don't want to take 30+ lbs of gear, I am just putting in some numbers and that is what I used last time for the RH calculator).


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Old 06-09-22, 08:03 AM
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So RH recommends a substantially higher tire pressure, which I would not have guessed. I think this is possibly because the sidewalls are so thin.

I've also noticed with my 42mm treaded tires that they work substantially better (no slipping) in loose gravel/dirt if they are inflated higher than recommended, which is completely counter-intuitive and contradicts their own recommendation to let air out for gravel.

The pressure calculators only get you so far.
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Old 06-09-22, 08:14 AM
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Originally Posted by Polaris OBark View Post
So RH recommends a substantially higher tire pressure, which I would not have guessed. I think this is possibly because the sidewalls are so thin.

I've also noticed with my 42mm treaded tires that they work substantially better (no slipping) in loose gravel/dirt if they are inflated higher than recommended, which is completely counter-intuitive and contradicts their own recommendation to let air out for gravel.

The pressure calculators only get you so far.
I've ridden a fair amount on varying surfaces, including riding on snow and ice all Canadian winter, and lowering pressures compared to harder surfaces always helps with traction, front and rear, but especially front.
I note pressures, but very much go by feel.
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Old 06-09-22, 08:28 AM
  #36  
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Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN View Post
I am really surprised that they would say the same pressure in front as in rear. That company used to promote what they called the "15 percent tire drop", that looked at how much weight you had on each tire. I often ran higher pressures than they suggested, I treated their 15 percent as a minimum. Their suggestions maxed out at 37mm tire width, which was about the widest that most 700c bikes could take at that time. But I felt that their calculation had way too little pressure in the front wheel so I ran a much higher pressure. Later they changed their theory on front and suggested higher pressure was needed for braking, as braking would shift some of your weight to the front wheel. This article is before they suggested to raise the pressure higher in the front tire.
https://www.adventurecycling.org/def...SIRX_Heine.pdf

I typically run the front at about two thirds to three fourths as much pressure as I have in the rear. There was one exception, in West Texas I was on some really rough chip seal for a week and I dropped my front pressure to maybe 55 percent as much as I had in the rear to reduce the vibration in my handlebars.
I think the idea of inflating the tires differently based on weight distribution was mostly carried over from Frank Berto, and Jan didn't seem to have as much of a problem with it at first. But he's definitely a sportier rider who will ride fast on steep roads and brake hard when necessary... perhaps there's also a liability element when suggesting really low pressures in the front?

Ever since I went down this rabbit hole years ago, I've been content with using a 45/55 weight distribution for my tires, and the new Rene Herse Tire Pressure Calculator unwittingly delivers that for me. I just use the "soft" recommendation in front and the "firm" recommendation in the back.
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Old 06-09-22, 10:08 AM
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Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN View Post
I typically run the front at about two thirds to three fourths as much pressure as I have in the rear. There was one exception, in West Texas I was on some really rough chip seal for a week and I dropped my front pressure to maybe 55 percent as much as I had in the rear to reduce the vibration in my handlebars.
Yeah, that Texas chip seal can be the worst! Did you only drop the pressure in the front? I usually lower both. I figure it makes sense to have a balance between front and back.

I like the idea of going by percentage drop, but am too lazy to calculate it. I think I wind up with a similar drop front and back without actually calculating it though.

I don't usually get very scientific with tire pressure. I used to just run them quite hard. In some cases a bit harder that the label listed as maximum. I noticed that over the long term rides tended to be a little faster on some of my regular around home rides when they were a bit softer due to my laziness in topping off pressure. Then I started watching the data more closely and found that didn't seem to be true for really smooth pristine surfaces. Since then I have tried to run the higher pressures on really nice surfaces and lower ones on slightly to very much rougher ones. I am pretty sure it works out better for both performance and comfort.

I suspect that rolling resistance on a glassy smooth surface is actually better with a tire that is inflated quite hard, but it is possible that the performance increase I observed was due to rider comfort.
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Old 06-09-22, 11:44 AM
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For a long while I ran my RH tires too soft. When you do this, the sidewall will occasionally collapse, and it degrades the tire. You can see this as dark cross-hatching, especially on the inside of tan sidewalls.
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Old 06-09-22, 11:53 AM
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Originally Posted by Polaris OBark View Post
For a long while I ran my RH tires too soft. When you do this, the sidewall will occasionally collapse, and it degrades the tire. You can see this as dark cross-hatching, especially on the inside of tan sidewalls.
​​​​​​
I've seen this, but from what I've seen, you really need to ride a lot under pressured to get that to happen. I've never had it myself, but have seen it on other people's tires
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Old 06-09-22, 12:17 PM
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Originally Posted by djb View Post
​​​​​​
I've seen this, but from what I've seen, you really need to ride a lot under pressured to get that to happen. I've never had it myself, but have seen it on other people's tires
The example on the left is 38mm Steilacoom and on the right, less severe, is a 38 mm Barlow Pass:


Last edited by Polaris OBark; 06-09-22 at 01:04 PM. Reason: spelling (Steilacoom)
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Old 06-09-22, 07:36 PM
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Originally Posted by staehpj1 View Post
Yeah, that Texas chip seal can be the worst! Did you only drop the pressure in the front? I usually lower both. I figure it makes sense to have a balance between front and back.
....
Tire width was 40mm, Schwalbe Marathons (plain version). Van supported ACA trip. So, all we had to carry was our food and water for the day. They suggested a lot of water, maybe four liters or so. I think I carried more than anyone else, carried about three liters. Almost everybody else was on skinny tire road bikes, did not have a way to carry much water. I think two with wider tire bikes had tires between 40 and 50mm, but recollection is fading over the past four years. I had my folding bike, two liters of water on the frame, Pendle bag on back with a liter or two of water in the bag, plus clothing as we shed it during the day. In other words, very lightly loaded bike.

I do not remember the rear pressure very well, that was four years ago, maybe high 70s or low 80s. Front, first day had high 50s for pressure, between 55 and 60. My hands really took a beating, my GPS started acting up and I was afraid that the vibration was damaging the GPS electronics. Second day, dropped the pressure to between 40 and 45 in front. But, did not change the rear pressure, as my folding bike with a tall extension to the seatpost and the sprung Brooks Conquest did a great job of smoothing out the road buzz from the rear. And that low 40s up front worked out so well for smoothing out the road buzz on my handlebars that I stayed with that for the rest of the week. My GPS still occasionally has problems from that day.

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Old 06-09-22, 08:03 PM
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Nice to see that I'm not the only idiot with a pile of extra tires in my garage
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Old 06-10-22, 11:14 PM
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Originally Posted by Polaris OBark View Post
I have 55mm 700c RH Antelope Hill tires and a (small bit of) clearance. Is this hopeless, or are their any fenders I can get that would work? (The frame is a Soma Saga Disc.)

[Yes, I know getting narrower tires is the correct answer, but I've now sunk a fair chunk of change and time into my beach cruiser blimps, including setting them up tubeless.]

Here is what I am dealing with.

If you have tools or materials already https://www.rei.com/blog/cycle/diy-bike-fenders but there are plenty DIY methods of making your own fenders or cutting a detergent container. You can get really creative!



Also how long have you been using that Brooks C17 Cambium, is there a reason why you have it?

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Old 06-11-22, 03:48 AM
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Full fenders probably won't fit, but have a look at SKS Velo 65 Mountain 29. Failing that, check out some of the SKS or Topeak MTB fenders and have a look at racks etc for zip tie mounting points, instead of mounting them as per the manufacturer's suggested method.

Even get some coroplast, corrugated plastic snadwich, like Real Estate sign plastic, and line the inner side of the rear rack. You could then maybe find a single front fender.
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Old 06-11-22, 08:35 AM
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Originally Posted by Frenzen View Post

Is this your bike that you want to try touring with Frenzen?
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Old 06-11-22, 09:58 AM
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Originally Posted by Frenzen View Post
If you have tools or materials already https://www.rei.com/blog/cycle/diy-bike-fenders but there are plenty DIY methods of making your own fenders
Thank you. I never would have thought of that.

Also how long have you been using that Brooks C17 Cambium,
I probably have fewer than 20 miles on it.

is there a reason why you have it?
They had it on sale. Blue rivets. Waterproof. It makes me appreciate all the more what I already have.

Is there a reason why you ask?
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Old 06-11-22, 10:12 AM
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Originally Posted by djb View Post
Is this your bike that you want to try touring with Frenzen?
You are funny, I would never tour with such suspension especially because it will probably be heavy. Itís a google search image!
Originally Posted by Polaris OBark View Post
Thank you. I never would have thought of that.


I probably have fewer than 20 miles on it.


They had it on sale. Blue rivets. Waterproof. It makes me appreciate all the more what I already have.


Is there a reason why you ask?
I was thinking of getting one as I do not want a leather seat but it being waterproof is already a bonus for me!
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Old 06-11-22, 10:32 AM
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Originally Posted by Frenzen View Post
I was thinking of getting one as I do not want a leather seat but it being waterproof is already a bonus for me!
Try before you buy. If I left on a tour tomorrow, I would switch it out for my heavy but otherwise perfect B-17. I've only just started playing around with it, but these don't break in. There is no reason it should feel any different at 10,000 km than on day 1.

I actually bought it for the bike with the B-17 on it, since it matches the color scheme and is a bit sleeker-looking, figuring I would use the B-17 to tour. But I thought I would put it on a different bike first, since the one with the B-17 is absolutely perfect, and I am worried I would never get it back into the ideal position if I don't like the C-17.

Here is the other bike with the B-17 (copper rivets).

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Old 06-11-22, 10:43 AM
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Originally Posted by Frenzen View Post
You are funny, I would never tour with such suspension especially because it will probably be heavy. Itís a google search image!

I was thinking of getting one as I do not want a leather seat but it being waterproof is already a bonus for me!
Ah ok, I get it.
Some people like the c17 fine, for me it's ok, not great but ok.
Like with lots of things, it depends--completely personal depending on the individual.
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Old 06-11-22, 11:56 AM
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Originally Posted by djb View Post
Ah ok, I get it.
Some people like the c17 fine, for me it's ok, not great but ok.
Like with lots of things, it depends--completely personal depending on the individual.
Funnily enough I found your comments from 2016 thread about it, saying how you wouldn't spend 230 CAD on it, and later on you bought it and was even offering to lend it to someone! My other concern is
after 2 years of using with jeans

Originally Posted by Polaris OBark View Post
Try before you buy. If I left on a tour tomorrow, I would switch it out for my heavy but otherwise perfect B-17. I've only just started playing around with it, but these don't break in. There is no reason it should feel any different at 10,000 km than on day 1.

I actually bought it for the bike with the B-17 on it, since it matches the color scheme and is a bit sleeker-looking, figuring I would use the B-17 to tour. But I thought I would put it on a different bike first, since the one with the B-17 is absolutely perfect, and I am worried I would never get it back into the ideal position if I don't like the C-17.

Here is the other bike with the B-17 (copper rivets).
Yeah I like the look of c17 as well, and I like the part that it doesn't need to be break it

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