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Tent - Freestanding or....not

Old 08-27-22, 05:22 PM
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Trueblood
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Tent - Freestanding or....not

I am intrigued by this tent -OneTigris Backwoods Bungalow Ultralight Bushcraft Shelter 2.0. Thinking of trying it with separate tent poles vs using trekking poles. It seems to have excellent reviews, and is reasonably priced. The disadvantages are that is is a single wall tent, and not freestanding. Not being freestanding, pavilion pitches would be problematic. I am thinking of using it for shorter rail trail tours, say the Erie canal, etc..

On the plus side, it is only 3.2 lbs minus the poles, actually 3 lbs per this guy's review -
The side panel functions as a tarp, eliminating the challenges of cooking in the rain in a small vestibule. He does indicate in the review that it may need some seam sealing, not a big deal. Does anyone have experience with this company, or specifically this tent?




In another video, he reviews the OneTigris quilt -
I am thinking of a sleep system involving a quilt. I see lots of backpacking videos swearing by them. Anyone touring with a quilt?

Thanks!

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Old 08-27-22, 05:37 PM
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Never heard but if you want lightweight and spacious:https://www.bigagnes.com/Tiger-Wall-UL3-Bikepack is an awesome option I have their Fly Creek UL2 but just didn't love the layout and wanted side doors and more space.
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Old 08-27-22, 05:43 PM
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There are work arounds when pitching within a pavilion or building so don't let that stop you. Single wall tents tend to retain more condensation vs. double wall but not always. There are tons and tons of new tents out there for every budget so if you like, give it a shot and let us know how it worked out for you.
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Old 08-27-22, 06:12 PM
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I have a One Tigris underquilt that works very well at the price point. The material, seams, construction, etc. is all good quality. As far I my observations go, their gear is well made and a decent choice for people on a budget.
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Old 08-27-22, 06:17 PM
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I have one tigris quilt and an under quilt for my hammocks. I have another brandís quilt that is stiffer and unwieldy in the hammock. Itís a bother on bed or bed roll as well. I do prefer the One Tigris

I like the tent there too, assuming the entry is through the big screen. . Narrow end entry is counter intuitive to me

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Old 08-27-22, 06:25 PM
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We've spent a month touring Yellowstone/Grand Tetons. My wife and I in a Big Agnes tiger wall and my daughter in a Zpacks duplex.

1. The Big Agnes suffered from condensation even more than the (single walled) Duplex. The difference is that vapor condensed on the fly. Getting out of the BA without rubbing against the wet fly was next to impossible, whereas it's easy to avoid touching the Duplex's ceiling.

2. We opted for the BA because it is free standing. And purchased the 3-person model so we could squeeze in if we'd been unable to set the Duplex. Turns out that we were never unable to set the Duplex. Rocks were enough in the one place where it's been impossible to hammer the pegs.

So: (A) condensation is function of ventilation. Some single-walled tents are extremely well ventilated and turn out to be dryer than double walled tents. (B) the vast majority of campers where using freestanding tents. Nice concept (easy to move around if there's a rock under your sleeping pad) but frankly not absolutely necessary in three seasons scenarios (pitching in snow is a different story l.
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Old 08-27-22, 07:20 PM
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Originally Posted by streetsurfer View Post
I have one tigris quilt and an under quilt for my hammocks. I have another brandís quilt that is stiffer and unwieldy in the hammock. Itís a bother on bed or bed roll as well. I do prefer the One Tigris

I like the tent there too, assuming the entry is through the big screen. . Narrow end entry is counter intuitive to me
Yes, the entry is through the big screen. The entire screen can be unzipped and rolled up during cooler months, when insects are less of a concern. Thanks for your feedback on the quilt and the company.
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Old 08-27-22, 07:44 PM
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Originally Posted by mtnbud View Post
I have a One Tigris underquilt that works very well at the price point. The material, seams, construction, etc. is all good quality. As far I my observations go, their gear is well made and a decent choice for people on a budget.
Sounds like a good value at 80 bucks. Putting together an equipment list. Thanks!
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Old 08-28-22, 04:50 AM
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I use a Big Agnes Scout Plus for bike touring, I think they stopped making it several years ago. Single wall roof, uses two trekking poles, not self supporting.

You are obviously on a budget and this tent cost a lot more than your budget when they still made them, I only mention it because of the single wall, poles and not self supporting. It was sold as a two person tent, I think for two it would be a disaster because you can't avoid rubbing on the ceiling when moving about, but as a solo it was great because sleeping in the middle gave me room to avoid rubbing on the wet (from condensation) ceiling.

The plank floor at this campsite was very inconvenient, but I managed to jam twigs into the gaps between the planks to substitute for stakes.

Bike touring, trekking poles make no sense, I cut tent poles to use, cut them with enough segments that when I folded the poles they were short enough to pack in my front pannier. Photo below is five years old and this is still my go-to tent for bike touring.



***

I also bought one of the tents shown below to use for backpacking (not bikepacking). Have only used it a little bit and it is small enough that it only works for me for backpacking. I want more space inside for bike touring than this tent offers. There is very little space inside this tent for stuff, it is essentially a tent to sleep in and that is all. There are several different brand names on this but they all share the name Lanshan 1. This version has a netting tent under a rain fly that is detachable from the netting, but there are similar looking ones that have the dreaded single wall ceiling condensation problem. I would not buy the single wall version, but am happy with the version with a detachable fly.
https://www.amazon.com/Ultralight-3-...8XVPJWTS/?th=1

Photo below is my Lanshan 1 from backpacking last year and I will be sleeping in this tent a week from now on another backpacking trip. Since I had some left over pole material, I cut a pole for this tent too, do not need to use my trekking pole for the tent which saves me some minutes when putting up the tent so I do not have to mess with adjusting the pole length.



The on-line reviews on that tent suggested there was a sewn thru seam that leaked in two places, I bought some sealer and sealed those seams before use.

They make a Lanshan 2 that is supposed to be a two person tent that uses two trekking poles if you need more space. I was not interested in that so I did not research it and know almost nothing about it.

I learned of this Lanshan 1 tent from a gal that had bought one three years ago, she was bike touring with it and very happy. That said, she was pretty small so for her it had a lot more interior space. I am about 6 foot and the Lanshan 1 works for me, but some people that are shorter complain that it is too short for them. She had the yellow version, shown below.



***

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Old 08-28-22, 07:21 AM
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No experience with that company, but lots with single wall shelters and a quilt.

I've been using Tarptent shelters. There is a learning curve to deal with condensation. After twenty years of using them, I think it's worth it. For one thing, it's easier to dry during a quick sun break during the day. I think freestanding shelters are not worth the extra weight for the benefits they provide, and don't like messing with long hoop poles.

I bought a quilt just for a bike tour, and it turns out it's my favorite backcountry gear purchase ever.
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Old 08-28-22, 03:06 PM
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As far as freestanding V.S. not freestanding. My experience has been that if it's going to rain or it has been raining and you would prefer to not deal with having muddy feet, a potentially muddy tent bottom, it is nice to have a freestanding tent to put up on concrete/ asphalt/ non mud surface. Side entry tents are easier to get into /out of, than end entry tents.
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Old 08-28-22, 08:02 PM
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Freestanding = fast set-up.
Also, stakes are not essential so you can do hardpan.

Pic - Payette River, Idaho, Sawtooth Mtns

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Old 08-29-22, 04:56 AM
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Originally Posted by headwind15 View Post
As far as freestanding V.S. not freestanding. My experience has been that if it's going to rain or it has been raining and you would prefer to not deal with having muddy feet, a potentially muddy tent bottom, it is nice to have a freestanding tent to put up on concrete/ asphalt/ non mud surface. Side entry tents are easier to get into /out of, than end entry tents.
Per message 7 up thread the entrance to the OneTigris Bungalow is the entire mesh side, not the end. Thinking of a Tyvek footprint which would extend a foot or two beyond the tent on the mesh side beneath the canopy.to form a 'porch'.
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Old 08-29-22, 05:02 AM
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“Way back here on the east coast” I much prefer free standing tents. Messing with the long loop poles means I get a pretty aerodynamic tent. No I’m not faster on the road but we must assume a thunderstorm is always a possibility. In a good blow a low wind cheating tent has a better chance. And the low to the ground tent fly helps manage driving wind. BTDT. My free standing tents also have openings on both sides for good ventilation.

We also have some very nice state and federal parks that have installed camping pads - level platforms or pads with packed gravel and screenings. Some are very difficult to drive tent pegs into. And any trees are outside the pad (primarily designed for trucks and campers. Oh well). With a free standing tent I’m at liberty to focus on water drainage and smooth level spots for tent placement. YMMV.
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Old 08-29-22, 07:48 AM
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basically there come situations when it's raining, its getting dark and you've spent a few hours riding and looking for a camp spot to no avail when at last minute you find some kind of gazebo or roofed patio and the last thing you want to do is to find out how to find some tie outs on the cement floor and you thank your lucky stars for purchasing a freestanding tent.

This past spring I toured Scotland and this exact scenario happened. It rained all day, wind blew 40mph, I stopped at two hotels that were full, and I found this roofed overhang and all I had with me on this trip was a Hilleberg Akto and I just could not pitch it there... so I kept going
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Old 08-29-22, 12:04 PM
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Non free standing tents are fine for the Erie Canal. They will work as long as you are on terrain that holds stakes securely. In barren areas where the ground is sandy, no.

I would look at Hennessy hammocks as well. Trees are plentiful in the north east and I've never had a problem setting up. Very fast, very light, and surprisingly comfortable.
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Old 08-29-22, 01:31 PM
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Non freestandong with hoops and where you just need to guy out two end points are not bad. In some cases you can get by with just putting something heavy in each end. Ones with vertical poles and more tie out points required are a pain.
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Old 08-29-22, 01:37 PM
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Yeah. I have had a few two hoop tents (still have 3) and I just love them. Minimal number of stakes. Fast up and fast down.
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Old 08-29-22, 02:10 PM
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Originally Posted by Yan View Post
.... In barren areas where the ground is sandy, no.
....
I have some snow stakes that work great in sand, but they work best if you put two in at different angles but you need twice as many that way. Have used them in beach sand.

Not sure why they only come with holes in them now, I have some of the longer ones that have no holes.
https://smcgear.com/smc-snow-stakes.html
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Old 08-29-22, 02:34 PM
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Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN View Post
I have some snow stakes that work great in sand, but they work best if you put two in at different angles but you need twice as many that way. Have used them in beach sand.

Not sure why they only come with holes in them now, I have some of the longer ones that have no holes.
https://smcgear.com/smc-snow-stakes.html
The holes are for tying your string. You get greater holding power by tying your string underground instead of at the surface. That's what people do in mountaineering.

On the product description they also say the holes let the snow freeze together solid.
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Old 08-29-22, 03:24 PM
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Freestanding onot

Originally Posted by PedalingWalrus View Post
basically there come situations when it's raining, its getting dark and you've spent a few hours riding and looking for a camp spot to no avail when at last minute you find some kind of gazebo or roofed patio and the last thing you want to do is to find out how to find some tie outs on the cement floor and you thank your lucky stars for purchasing a freestanding tent.

This past spring I toured Scotland and this exact scenario happened. It rained all day, wind blew 40mph, I stopped at two hotels that were full, and I found this roofed overhang and all I had with me on this trip was a Hilleberg Akto and I just could not pitch it there... so I kept going
This is pretty much the scenario I was referring to.
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Old 08-29-22, 03:50 PM
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Originally Posted by Yan View Post
The holes are for tying your string. You get greater holding power by tying your string underground instead of at the surface. That's what people do in mountaineering.

On the product description they also say the holes let the snow freeze together solid.
When I bought them, they came with or without holes. I doubt that the sand will freeze into the holes on a warm day.

Perhaps the non drilled or non-punch pressed variety sold too slow.
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Old 09-21-22, 02:25 AM
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I've used both non-freestanding and free-standing tents and I much, MUCH, prefer a free-standing tent as it's far more versatile in terms of terrain I can set up in. Plus, if it's not windy it doesn't even need staking before I get into it. Another advantage to a free-standing tent is the ease with which it can be moved if I discover something poking me when I lay down. That's a great advantage if I have to set up in very low light or in the dark.

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