Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Touring
Reload this Page >

Motion sensitive alarm to go in panniers

Notices
Touring Have a dream to ride a bike across your state, across the country, or around the world? Self-contained or fully supported? Trade ideas, adventures, and more in our bicycle touring forum.

Motion sensitive alarm to go in panniers

Old 11-20-22, 07:06 AM
  #26  
Tourist in MSN
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 9,885

Bikes: 1961 Ideor, 1966 Perfekt 3 Speed AB Hub, 1994 Bridgestone MB-6, 2006 Airnimal Joey, 2009 Thorn Sherpa, 2013 Thorn Nomad MkII, 2015 VO Pass Hunter, 2017 Lynskey Backroad, 2017 Raleigh Gran Prix, 1980s Bianchi Mixte on a trainer. Others are now gone.

Mentioned: 43 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2898 Post(s)
Liked 1,041 Times in 839 Posts
Originally Posted by djb View Post
I guess I don't get it because when I set up my tent, I then set up camp mat and sleeping bag, which cone out of a pannier, so just easier to take it over tent. Reverse also for packing, just pack my things inside tent. Other panniers have clothes etc, so again, just easier inside tent unpacking and repacking in morning. Faster too.
Same goes with my sleep clothes, electronics that I use in tent or whatever. Just more convenient to have panniers in tent, and weather can and does change during night.
There are several people on this forum that have described how they leave the panniers on the bike and take stuff out as needed, etc. Some of them use a bivy sack instead of tent.

I agree with you, I get to a campsite, my tent comes out of my front right pannier and gets set up. Then handlebar bag and all panniers come off the bike.

A few months ago I did a two week backpacking trip, took a tiny little light weight tent, which worked great. Except it did not work so good the morning where there was a steady rain and I had to pack up my backpack out in the rain, getting even the dry stuff damp. Backpacking, I was carrying minimal stuff, so only took a few minutes to pack the backpack but the rain was quite steady so everything got wet.

I like a two person tent for solo travel on a bike, when it is raining in the morning I can pack up my gear inside the tent into the panniers. Then pack up the tent last. My first three tours were with a solo tent, but that third tour was pretty rainy and was my last tour with a solo tent. But panniers are smaller than a backpack, even a solo tent with a small vestibule can be used to pack stuff in rain, unlike my backpacking trip where the backpack could not be packed in the tent or vestibule.

The topic of this thread is theft. I like to have all my panniers and handlebar bag out of sight in a tent. I think leaving panniers on a bike invites problems when you are outside of your campsite area.

When I leave my campsite I want it to look like this, all you see is a tent and a bike with nothing on the bike to steal, bike locked to a picnic table or tree. Sorry the photo is dark, it was sunset.



That said, I try to always camp in developed campgrounds with water and showers, etc. But if you are wild camping, I can see leaving panniers on a bike and not worrying about people walking past your site because it is not really a site.
Tourist in MSN is offline  
Old 11-20-22, 08:36 AM
  #27  
djb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Montreal Canada
Posts: 12,582
Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2490 Post(s)
Liked 778 Times in 648 Posts
Originally Posted by indyfabz View Post
Let me ask you a question: How tall are you, and what size tent do you use?

Im 62 with linebacker shoulders. The Quarterdome tent has a little more room than the Fly Creek, but not a whole lot more. Getting changed in either is difficult. But if I need to, the clothes Im going to ride in in the morning are in my sleeping bag sack serving as a pillow. The panniers are waterproof, and the only device out is my phone. The Kindle gets stowed before I turn in.
Ah, of course that's it, makes sense.
While I'm over 5'10", I'm a beanpole, and my wife is vertically challenged, so it's a lot easier to put the stuff in the tent.
Thanks
djb is offline  
Old 11-21-22, 07:37 AM
  #28  
indyfabz
Senior Member
 
indyfabz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 36,005
Mentioned: 204 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16546 Post(s)
Liked 11,476 Times in 5,544 Posts
Depending on where I am, I might toss my paniers in my tent and put things like my stove out of sight under the fly if I leave my site for an extended period. (E,g,, not simply to shower.) That often happens with the bike, so that is not a concern. Thing is, a lot of times there are things left out at other sites that a far more valuable than my cooking gear. For example, ever see what a Yeti cooler costs?

I have told this story before, but the only time someone attempted to steal anything from me was in DuBois, WY. Stupidly left the stove out at the tenting area of a private campground. That area was not secure and was right along a road leading to some sort of housing development. Car stopped in broad daylight. Passenger got out and started to climb the low, post rail fence. Fortunately, I was outside the laundry room and saw everything. When I got up and started walking quickly towards my tent, the kid made a bee line back to the car and the two sped off. Not even sure why the stove was out. The night before I camped at a primitive site. It may have been that I didn't do dishes that night due to limited water supply and had done them when I got to DuBois that day.
indyfabz is offline  
Old 11-21-22, 07:48 AM
  #29  
djb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Montreal Canada
Posts: 12,582
Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2490 Post(s)
Liked 778 Times in 648 Posts
I've been surprised many times by middle of the night showers, so it's even pretty rare that I'll leave the rain fly off. In really hot and sticky weather, I'll some have the fly just off to one side for better ventilation, so if woken up by rain, it's faster to get it fully on properly.
Kinda same reason I'd rather have the panniers in tent or vestibule over night, so if raining I can pack up without going out into rain.

And yes, I'm the same for throwing stuff out of sight if gone for a bit, but that really depends on the specific situation.
djb is offline  
Old 11-21-22, 08:42 AM
  #30  
indyfabz
Senior Member
 
indyfabz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 36,005
Mentioned: 204 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16546 Post(s)
Liked 11,476 Times in 5,544 Posts
Originally Posted by djb View Post
I've been surprised many times by middle of the night showers, so it's even pretty rare that I'll leave the rain fly off.
One thing I really liked about my June Vermont trip were the lean-tos at state parks. I didn't have to use the fly until my last night, when I camped at the municipal campground in Newport. And I did get some rain during the trip. One day it started raining around 5 a.m. Rain lasted until around 5 p.m. Swapped days off. It was nice to have a roof over my head. It rained another night as well, after I had gotten a good fire going.
indyfabz is offline  
Old 11-22-22, 04:59 PM
  #31  
stardognine
Partially Sane.
 
stardognine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Sunny Sacramento.
Posts: 3,534

Bikes: Soma Saga, pre-disc

Mentioned: 22 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 968 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 631 Times in 459 Posts
I "kinda" like the idea of an alarm, but I prefer the idea of just setting very large mouse traps. 😁 That oughta cure that particular thief, anyways. As long as you don't forget about them, and "catch" yourself. 😲😁😉
stardognine is offline  
Old 11-24-22, 09:02 AM
  #32  
denis_987
Newbie
 
Join Date: Apr 2021
Posts: 40
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 26 Post(s)
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
To prevent theft from opportunist, I use the anti-theft cables from ortlieb ( https://www.ortlieb.com/en_us/anti-theft-device+E124# ). Also from time to time, I add zip ties around the buckles. I know, that doesn't stop determined thief. But nothing can be done to stop those except stay home ... and even!
denis_987 is offline  
Old 12-22-22, 06:52 PM
  #33  
stevepusser
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 765
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 58 Post(s)
Liked 4 Times in 4 Posts
It depends on where you are camping. I wish the California coast was as crime-free as the interior of Iceland. It's far from that.

Many campgrounds also have trash pandas that, if they are polite, have learned to open zippers on panniers; otherwise they will just chew a hole in your expensive panniers to get at your foods. They'll probably get spooked and annoyed by the alarm--tests needed. Also tests with black and grizzly bears...

I have this wdscam alarm on my seatpost, since it's a good tail light and brake light too. Almost bright enough to be a daytime running light. I got it on sale a few months ago for less than $20.

https://www.amazon.com/WSDCAM-Rechar...ef_=ast_sto_dp

It doesn't come with a handle bar mount for the remote, so the horn is pretty much useless unless you McGuyver your own. Other than that, it's great, and you can mess with kids from a distance as they walk by the bike.
stevepusser is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell or Share My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2023 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.