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Keeping Feet Dry

Old 01-03-23, 10:32 AM
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gpshay
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Keeping Feet Dry

On my last tour I used clip-less pedals I found them problematic on starting up on grades .. I decided on BlackSpire flat platform pedals with pins .. the only shoe I have found that holds up to the pins are Vans Old School skating tennis shoes .. NOW here is my question .. How do I keep them dry in a down pour .. My Gore shoe covers come in contact with a few of the pins and will destroy the fabric .. I have thought of removing the pins on one side of the pedal BUT I think the pedal would have no grip and might create a "slipping off" problem .. I first thought of applying some rubberized coating i.e. flex seal .. not sure if that would just peel off .. then I contemplated some of that "peel and stick" traction type tape .. the kind that is used on outdoor steps .. however there is not a lot of area on the pedal to adhere the tape too ... I worry about it staying put also ... I have even done a little research on those "running gaiters" but they seemed to be glued to the shoe .. so that doesn't seem very practical .. putting on wet cold shoes in the tent, in the morning is really something I would like to remedy .... can you think of a solution ?
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Old 01-03-23, 11:02 AM
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Originally Posted by gpshay
NOW here is my question .. How do I keep them dry in a down pour ..
You don't. I have been touring wearing Crocs. Your fee will get wet, but they dry in a very short time after the rain. Crocks also provide a great surface for the pins to grip. Others wear sandals like Keens. They will also dry fairly quickly. Vans, though I like them and have commuted using them, will be wet for over a day.
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Old 01-03-23, 11:37 AM
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Being not fond of socks in summer, I tour with bike (clip-less) sandals. I carry thin neoprene socks for cold/wet weather, but rarely use.
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Old 01-03-23, 12:17 PM
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The pins would be on the fabric on the sole side of the shoe, that should not matter if the sole gets wet. That said, I have no clue what a skating tennis shoe is so maybe that has a permeable sole?

I use clipless shoes with SPD cleats when I tour, but I use pedals that are platform on one side, cleat hardware on the other side of the pedal. If you wanted to try clipless again, that would be an option.

I think my covers are Gore, am happy with them. You can see the platform side of the Shimano M324 pedal, but there are plenty of other pedals that are platform on one side, cleat on the other.

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Old 01-03-23, 12:29 PM
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As far as keeping feet dry...
There is a difference between a cold downpour in damp conditions and downpours in other conditions. For situations where it isn't cold, I don't worry too much about it and just let my feet get wet and then dry again. When it is cold, I've used shoe covers though have difficulty finding them in my shoe size so have also improvised with plastic bags inside the shoe.

As far as slipping from the pedals including wet:
My bikes still have a few different attachment mechanisms. My Trek 520 still has toe clips so that also addresses the slipping issue. My Trek 4500 has two sided pedals - platform on one side and clipless on the other. Most of the time, when commuting or around town, I use the platform side. They can be more slippery when wet but it hasn't been a big issue.
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Old 01-04-23, 08:00 AM
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Ditto on the plastic bags inside the shoe, also known as "Bagtex." Bread bags work well, cost nothing, weigh nothing. Use a shoe with a nylon mesh upper and it'll dry quickly, and won't feel so damn cold in the morning.
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Old 01-04-23, 09:49 AM
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I don't try to keep them dry. I found that after years of riding, trail running, and other outdoor stuff it was best, for me at least, to just wear footwear that drained well and didn't soak up much moisture. Pair them with socks that did the same and I have been happy. For me that means shoes with enough mesh and made of something that leaves my feet pretty dry after a socks change. My sidi shoes and cheap poly socks work pretty well for me.
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Old 01-04-23, 11:07 AM
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Plastic bag inside the shoe, outside your sock.

I used to use booties but they where a pain in the ass and inevitably fall apart.
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Old 01-07-23, 03:42 PM
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How about half toe clips? MKS makes some metal ones. Zefal makes plastic ones. They essentially just keep your feet on the pedal and you don't need the pins. They should accomodate shoe covers.
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Old 01-07-23, 07:46 PM
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Most of the water that gets your feet wet comes from the front tire. A full coverage fender does better than any shoe cover keeping your feet dry, except in downpours. Shoe covers will stop some of that but I've found that water will eventually find its way in. Like others have said, get shoes and socks that dry quickly and always try to have a pair of dry socks to slip into at the end of the day.

I like lightweight running shoes, Altras for me, and large flat pedals with pins (Oneup composites are grippy and cheap).
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Old 01-07-23, 08:09 PM
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Two tricks. In cooler to cold weather, double bags on your feet. First goes against your skin. Your usual socks, then a second bag, then I pull the thinnest stretchy sock I can find over that. Socks stay dry and insulating. You will want to wash your now soaking feet at the end of the day and rinse the insides of that pair of bags.

And cycling gaitors. I make them from windblock, slightly stretchy outdoor fabric. I make them as a wrap around my ankle. Top half is ankle circumference plus the width of velcro take. Bottom half is slightly bell shaped and about an inch bigger than the ankle section. Similar velcro. Tights or legwarmers go on over the gaitors.

I made mine for cycling boots. Work really well there. Then I discovered they also made my shoes far warmer in the rain but I wish I'd thought of that before I cut the fabric and I'd tailored them better for shoes. Even with the poor fit, my feet stay a lot drier and much warmer.
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Old 01-07-23, 08:19 PM
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Originally Posted by niknak
Most of the water that gets your feet wet comes from the front tire. A full coverage fender does better than any shoe cover keeping your feet dry, except in downpours. Shoe covers will stop some of that but I've found that water will eventually find its way in. Like others have said, get shoes and socks that dry quickly and always try to have a pair of dry socks to slip into at the end of the day.

I like lightweight running shoes, Altras for me, and large flat pedals with pins (Oneup composites are grippy and cheap).
+1 to full front fenders with good, deep flaps. The matching full rear fender does wonders for keeping your bike cleaner.

If you have to wear wet socks, let the ones next to your skin be silk. (REI and not expensive.) I find there is virtually never a time when riding with silk socks is worse than without and sometimes it is far better. (Wet, hot, cold, blister conditions.)
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Old 01-08-23, 12:18 AM
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Originally Posted by andrewclaus
Ditto on the plastic bags inside the shoe, also known as "Bagtex." Bread bags work well, cost nothing, weigh nothing. Use a shoe with a nylon mesh upper and it'll dry quickly, and won't feel so damn cold in the morning.
My partly mesh bicycling shoes take forever to dry if soaked and that's with the shoes being indoors to dry. Therefore i try to avoid getting the shoes wet in the first place. Some Naugahyde, basic sewing skill and time will allow a person to make their own custom waterproof over-booties. It's no harder than making a moccasin-type slipper from leather. In fact you can make the over-bootie from leather then waterproof it.

Cheers
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Old 01-11-23, 03:04 PM
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Originally Posted by gpshay
On my last tour I used clip-less pedals I found them problematic on starting up on grades .. I decided on BlackSpire flat platform pedals with pins .. the only shoe I have found that holds up to the pins are Vans Old School skating tennis shoes .. NOW here is my question .. How do I keep them dry in a down pour
I use studded flat pedals with FiveTen Freerider shoes similar to your Vans, I have a few pairs of Sealskinz socks; they're really comfortable, breathable and so far totally waterproof. That one time I was caught in heavy rain wearing shorts, no mudguards and no waterproofs in the panniers; spray ran down my legs and inside the socks. I'm usually better prepared, but wet feet weren't uncomfortable, the socks acted like a wet-suit. I also use Crank Brothers clipless pedals with MTB shoes and overshoes, starting uphill isn't that difficult, Admittedly I've not tried it with a seriously loaded touring rig, the last time I went tent touring I was still using toe clips.
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Old 01-11-23, 05:07 PM
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I'm also in the camp that doesn't worry about wet feet in warm weather, but in cold and snow wet feet can be both painful and dangerous. I have a pair of Shower's Pass knit waterproof gloves that have a waterproof middle layer that gives them a bit of a Marigold washing up glove feel when pulled off, but they work very well when riding in the wet and the cold. Shower's Pass makes similar socks and those might be a good choice. Also Seal Skinz are popular.
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Old 01-11-23, 05:07 PM
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I never use clips or anything like that (blasphemy, lol), so platform pedals & hiking boots, in about 60įF or colder. I have chronic arthritis, so keeping warm is a necessity, not just a choice. 😉
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Old 01-12-23, 12:15 PM
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Originally Posted by grumpus
I use studded flat pedals with FiveTen Freerider shoes similar to your Vans, I have a few pairs of Sealskinz socks; they're really comfortable, breathable and so far totally waterproof. That one time I was caught in heavy rain wearing shorts, no mudguards and no waterproofs in the panniers; spray ran down my legs and inside the socks. I'm usually better prepared, but wet feet weren't uncomfortable, the socks acted like a wet-suit. I also use Crank Brothers clipless pedals with MTB shoes and overshoes, starting uphill isn't that difficult, Admittedly I've not tried it with a seriously loaded touring rig, the last time I went tent touring I was still using toe clips.
I just looked those up, but they do not mention them being waterproof. How long have you actually ridden in the rain at a time. Curious because if they are in fact waterproof, they would be a good option. Or is it simply the Sealskinz? I am familiar with the Sealskinz, but still prefer to not have damp shoes even with the Seaskinz.
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Old 01-12-23, 01:50 PM
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Originally Posted by phughes
I just looked those up,
You didn't have to look them up, I put a link there for you to click on.
Originally Posted by phughes
but they do not mention them being waterproof.
If you click on this link you'll see the page is titled "100% Waterproof, Windproof & Breathable Socks" and every sock on that page is called "Waterproof" with a variety of warm weather, all weather, cold weather and extreme cold weather options, and low/medium/high styles.
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Old 01-12-23, 02:33 PM
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Originally Posted by grumpus
You didn't have to look them up, I put a link there for you to click on.

If you click on this link you'll see the page is titled "100% Waterproof, Windproof & Breathable Socks" and every sock on that page is called "Waterproof" with a variety of warm weather, all weather, cold weather and extreme cold weather options, and low/medium/high styles.
Sorry, I didn't make my post clear. I looked up the shoes, not the socks. I am very familiar with Sealskins, they are great. I was inquiring about the shoes. When touring I hate soggy shoes, even with Sealskins. Shoes take forever to dry.
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Old 01-12-23, 03:55 PM
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I just remembered the lesson I learned my first season of racing. If you have to ride when it's pouring and it is too warm for full leggings and gaiters, shoes are going to get wet. Do yourself a big favor and provide a means for that water to leave. Traditional cycling shoes had 1 to 3 holes at the front of the sole between the toes and front of the ball of the foot. I never thought about those holes. Rode my first "real" (open) race in a steady, not light rain. Rain started 10pm the night before and was still going when we finished. By the end of the first hour we were completely soaked. 3 1/2 hours to go.

I never thought about my feet. But after the race we all heard loud and clear the complaints of those whose shoes didn't have those drains. They spent hours squishing water around inside their shoes at race RPM. And not a single one was a happy camper. (I've been known to drill those holes in shoes that did not come with them.)
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Old 01-12-23, 06:12 PM
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In a pinch you can do what this young women did on a very wet start in the morning-- improvise. They were a tough couple. They were riding the Icefield Parkway in Alberta, Canada from Jasper to Banff and back to Jasper during a long weekend. It was cold and the guy rode in shorts. We were camping near each other during a cold wet night.




We met them on their return trip two days later, and I noticed the guy was wearing a new looking pair of long-underwear under his shorts.


My wife in her wet weather gear on that cold rainy day: helmet cover, rain jacket, rain pants and gloves. In a pinch, we will use plastic bags, but usually good wool socks work well for us.

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Old 01-13-23, 06:49 AM
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Originally Posted by phughes
Sorry, I didn't make my post clear. I looked up the shoes, not the socks.
It was the socks I recommended, because socks don't care about pedal studs.
Originally Posted by phughes
I am very familiar with Sealskins, they are great. I was inquiring about the shoes. When touring I hate soggy shoes, even with Sealskins. Shoes take forever to dry.
IME when my feet are comfortable in good socks I don't care if my shoes are wet.
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Old 01-13-23, 08:17 AM
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trapping foot sweat inside a plastic bag isnt clammy and wet?
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Old 01-13-23, 11:14 AM
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Originally Posted by grumpus
It was the socks I recommended, because socks don't care about pedal studs.

IME when my feet are comfortable in good socks I don't care if my shoes are wet.
Yeah, I get that. I read your post too quickly while I was busy and distracted. Completely my fault.

The Sealskinz are a fantastic product. On a tour I just don't like soggy shoes. That is a personal thing though. In colder weather it becomes more of an issue, but most of us tour when it is warmer. Waterproof sock like Sealskinz are a very good thing to have no matter what kind of shoes you wear, for biking, hiking, or any other activity that takes you out in the elements.
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Old 01-13-23, 11:48 AM
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I use dog **** bags over my socks. They are the perfect size. Yes, feet will get wet, but stay warm.

Dog **** bags have many other uses as they donít let smell through.

Put newspaper in your shoes overnight to help them dry.

edit: censor didnít like that 🤨 Canine hygiene bags then 😉
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