Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Touring
Reload this Page >

Nitto Racks?

Notices
Touring Have a dream to ride a bike across your state, across the country, or around the world? Self-contained or fully supported? Trade ideas, adventures, and more in our bicycle touring forum.

Nitto Racks?

Old 05-04-23, 11:48 AM
  #1  
trailmix
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
trailmix's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 684

Bikes: 50+/-

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 63 Post(s)
Liked 80 Times in 48 Posts
Nitto Racks?

Anybody touring with Nitto racks?

I currently am riding a Long Haul Trucker with Nice racks which are fine. I bought a second LHT when I learned that it was going to be discontinued (I prefer the geometry of the rim brake frame) and I am thinking of using a Nitto MT-Campee on the back and a F25 up front. They are much more attractive than the Surly ones and the nickel plating should hold up better. Anybody have experience with these, or Nitto racks in general?
trailmix is offline  
Old 05-04-23, 03:04 PM
  #2  
indyfabz
Senior Member
 
indyfabz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 37,537
Mentioned: 208 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 17419 Post(s)
Liked 13,487 Times in 6,409 Posts
Only since 2011. Super strong. Iíve carried bundles of wood on both. Still look nearly new. But the Big front and rear are hard to find these days, and they have never been cheap.



indyfabz is offline  
Likes For indyfabz:
Old 05-05-23, 06:28 AM
  #3  
Tourist in MSN
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 10,578

Bikes: 1961 Ideor, 1966 Perfekt 3 Speed AB Hub, 1994 Bridgestone MB-6, 2006 Airnimal Joey, 2009 Thorn Sherpa, 2013 Thorn Nomad MkII, 2015 VO Pass Hunter, 2017 Lynskey Backroad, 2017 Raleigh Gran Prix, 1980s Bianchi Mixte on a trainer. Others are now gone.

Mentioned: 45 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3175 Post(s)
Liked 1,263 Times in 993 Posts
The only Nitto rack I have is a small rear one (R-14) that is only rated for 13 pounds, so my experience with Nitto is not applicable to touring loads. Very expensive, but I got mine used at a swap meet for a great price.

I bought the Surly racks soon after they came out almost two decades ago. But after a few years I decided they were just too big and too heavy for just using panniers on them. I replaced both with Tubus racks over a decade ago.

The front Surly was replaced with a Tubus Ergo (now discontinued). On another bike I have a Tubus Tara. As a pannier carrier, I find those are great and much lighter than the Surly. I donated my front Surly rack to a bike charity. On one of my bikes I have a decade old Nashbar tiny rack that mounts on the canti brake posts, so I have a tiny little front platform rack too.

The rear Surly, that rack was big and not as stiff as I wanted. I also wanted to put my panniers lower. I replaced it with a Tubus Logo EVO. The Tubus is half the weight and stiffer. The Logo is a great pannier carrier, but the platform is too narrow for rack top bag use without panniers, so the Logo is only used for touring, when I get home I put a different rack on the bike that has a wider platform for rack top bags.

My point is that you should also consider Tubus racks. And the tour I did last month, my rear rack was a Racktime Addit rack. Racktime has less capacity than Tubus, but they make good racks too.

Both Tubus and Racktime recently reduced their rated capacity for rear racks, on a different forum I learned that the reason for that has to do with liability for child seats in Europe. Old ratings, my Logo EVO was rated at 40 kg and my Racktime Addit was rated at 30 kg. Racktime racks are aluminum, Tubus are steel, stainless or titanium.
Tourist in MSN is offline  
Old 05-08-23, 08:07 PM
  #4  
trailmix
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
trailmix's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 684

Bikes: 50+/-

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 63 Post(s)
Liked 80 Times in 48 Posts
Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN
The only Nitto rack I have is a small rear one (R-14) that is only rated for 13 pounds, so my experience with Nitto is not applicable to touring loads. Very expensive, but I got mine used at a swap meet for a great price.

I bought the Surly racks soon after they came out almost two decades ago. But after a few years I decided they were just too big and too heavy for just using panniers on them. I replaced both with Tubus racks over a decade ago.

The front Surly was replaced with a Tubus Ergo (now discontinued). On another bike I have a Tubus Tara. As a pannier carrier, I find those are great and much lighter than the Surly. I donated my front Surly rack to a bike charity. On one of my bikes I have a decade old Nashbar tiny rack that mounts on the canti brake posts, so I have a tiny little front platform rack too.

The rear Surly, that rack was big and not as stiff as I wanted. I also wanted to put my panniers lower. I replaced it with a Tubus Logo EVO. The Tubus is half the weight and stiffer. The Logo is a great pannier carrier, but the platform is too narrow for rack top bag use without panniers, so the Logo is only used for touring, when I get home I put a different rack on the bike that has a wider platform for rack top bags.

My point is that you should also consider Tubus racks. And the tour I did last month, my rear rack was a Racktime Addit rack. Racktime has less capacity than Tubus, but they make good racks too.

Both Tubus and Racktime recently reduced their rated capacity for rear racks, on a different forum I learned that the reason for that has to do with liability for child seats in Europe. Old ratings, my Logo EVO was rated at 40 kg and my Racktime Addit was rated at 30 kg. Racktime racks are aluminum, Tubus are steel, stainless or titanium.
I looked into the Tubus racks and most of them are painted steel, like the Surly racks. I was looking at Nitto because they are nickel plated which would last much longer than paint. The stainless and Ti Tubus racks are even more expensive than the Nitto stuff.
trailmix is offline  
Old 05-09-23, 04:39 AM
  #5  
Tourist in MSN
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 10,578

Bikes: 1961 Ideor, 1966 Perfekt 3 Speed AB Hub, 1994 Bridgestone MB-6, 2006 Airnimal Joey, 2009 Thorn Sherpa, 2013 Thorn Nomad MkII, 2015 VO Pass Hunter, 2017 Lynskey Backroad, 2017 Raleigh Gran Prix, 1980s Bianchi Mixte on a trainer. Others are now gone.

Mentioned: 45 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3175 Post(s)
Liked 1,263 Times in 993 Posts
Originally Posted by trailmix
I looked into the Tubus racks and most of them are painted steel, like the Surly racks. I was looking at Nitto because they are nickel plated which would last much longer than paint. The stainless and Ti Tubus racks are even more expensive than the Nitto stuff.
If you lived on an ocean coast, I could see the concern about steel and paint. When I wear through the paint on one of my black racks, I use a small bottle of nail polish (brush built into the cap, very convenient) to touch up the wear spot. Takes no more than a couple minutes.

For touring, I put clear plastic hose slit lengthwise on my rack wear spots where the racks and panniers rub together, but I do not use my touring racks for around town riding near home. Near home, I use different racks. If I used the same racks near home for every day use that I use for touring, I would probably just use the nail polish, not use the plastic hose.
Tourist in MSN is offline  
Likes For Tourist in MSN:
Old 05-15-23, 04:22 AM
  #6  
HelpSingularity 
Full Member
 
HelpSingularity's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2022
Location: San Diego, California USA
Posts: 282

Bikes: 1974 Masi GC, 1982 Trek 728 (aka 720), 1992 Trek Multitrack 750

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 102 Post(s)
Liked 163 Times in 107 Posts
I have been using a Nitto rear rack for 20 or so years, purchased from Rivendell.
Most of those years the bicycle it was on was stored outside under a carport near Seattle, next to Lake Washington, fairly humid.
All the other metal items stored there were in various stages of corrosion.
To this day the rack still looks almost brand new, almost zero rust.
It is also fairly light weight for its carrying capacity.
Nitto products are a little spendy but you get what you pay for.
If you enjoy and appreciate quality and superb craftsmanship you won't be disappointed.
There is no better joinery, brazing and nickel plating on any rack anywhere.
I am also using the little Nitto front rack that supports my handlebar bag, also a fantastic piece of kit.
HelpSingularity is offline  
Likes For HelpSingularity:
Old 05-15-23, 10:17 AM
  #7  
phughes
Senior Member
 
phughes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 2,923
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 964 Post(s)
Liked 1,166 Times in 668 Posts
Originally Posted by trailmix
I looked into the Tubus racks and most of them are painted steel, like the Surly racks. I was looking at Nitto because they are nickel plated which would last much longer than paint. The stainless and Ti Tubus racks are even more expensive than the Nitto stuff.
My Tubus rack is 12 years old so far and still looks good. I believe it will still look good in another 12 years. Buy a rack that has the load capacity you need, the shape you need, and the mounting options you need. A Tubus rack will last longer than you most likely.
phughes is offline  
Old 05-15-23, 11:45 AM
  #8  
indyfabz
Senior Member
 
indyfabz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 37,537
Mentioned: 208 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 17419 Post(s)
Liked 13,487 Times in 6,409 Posts
Originally Posted by HelpSingularity
I have been using a Nitto rear rack for 20 or so years, purchased from Rivendell.
Most of those years the bicycle it was on was stored outside under a carport near Seattle, next to Lake Washington, fairly humid.
All the other metal items stored there were in various stages of corrosion.
To this day the rack still looks almost brand new, almost zero rust.
It is also fairly light weight for its carrying capacity.
Nitto products are a little spendy but you get what you pay for.
If you enjoy and appreciate quality and superb craftsmanship you won't be disappointed.
There is no better joinery, brazing and nickel plating on any rack anywhere.
I am also using the little Nitto front rack that supports my handlebar bag, also a fantastic piece of kit.
A good summary, though I must confess that one of the little CroMo stickers has started to peel a little after more than a decade of touring and commuting.

The other nice thing was that, at least as sold by Rivendell, the racks came with all sorts of hardware, including at least two different length rear rack stays and two different size p-clamps for the front rack. Was able to fit them to my LHT with no problem and nothing else to buy.
indyfabz is offline  
Likes For indyfabz:
Old 05-15-23, 12:30 PM
  #9  
irc
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Scotland
Posts: 109

Bikes: Surly LHT, Surly Pacer, Spa Steel Tourer, Kona Kula

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 36 Post(s)
Liked 39 Times in 23 Posts
The Logo rack now comes in stainless. Costs more but I'm guessing less than Nitto?

https://www.spacycles.co.uk/m5b0s79p4215/TUBUS-Logo-Classic-Stainless

My front and rear Tbus racks are painted steel. Still good 15 years on. I have two newer Logo racks on my local use bikes. Picked up on sale for about £25 each. Think the shop was discontinuing it's touring range or something.
irc is offline  
Old 05-15-23, 03:14 PM
  #10  
HelpSingularity 
Full Member
 
HelpSingularity's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2022
Location: San Diego, California USA
Posts: 282

Bikes: 1974 Masi GC, 1982 Trek 728 (aka 720), 1992 Trek Multitrack 750

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 102 Post(s)
Liked 163 Times in 107 Posts
I also purchased a stainless steel Tubus Nova low-rider front rack about 5 years ago.
I must have bought the very last one because it was discontinued shortly thereafter.
After receiving it I noticed it was designed in Germany but actually manufactured in China, not that there is anything wrong with that.
It has a good performance to weight ratio, i.e. it's pretty light.
I have zero complaints concerning performance.
One thing that did concern me was the quality of welds (probably MIG).
I remember my first reaction was: "Wow, they must have trained monkeys doing the welding".
The welds were amazingly rude and crude when compared to my (loverly ) brazed Nitto racks.
Also the steel has discolored a little bit due to some very minor surface corrosion.
I only mention it because my 20 year old Nitto, nickel plated, cro-mo rack, which spent most of it's life outside,
but covered, in a humid environment still looks almost brand new.
In contrast, the Nova rack has lived in a relatively low humidity environment, i.e. SoCal.
Having said all that, the Nova rack fits my 1992 Trek MultiTrack 750 very well.
I have used and abused the rack for 5 years now with zero issues.
I would purchase another one if I could.
I wish Nitto would make a low-rider rack like this.

Tubus Nova Low-Rider Front Rack (discontinued)
HelpSingularity is offline  
Old 05-15-23, 05:49 PM
  #11  
HelpSingularity 
Full Member
 
HelpSingularity's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2022
Location: San Diego, California USA
Posts: 282

Bikes: 1974 Masi GC, 1982 Trek 728 (aka 720), 1992 Trek Multitrack 750

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 102 Post(s)
Liked 163 Times in 107 Posts
Originally Posted by irc
The Logo rack now comes in stainless. Costs more but I'm guessing less than Nitto?

https://www.spacycles.co.uk/m5b0s79p...ssic-Stainless

My front and rear Tbus racks are painted steel. Still good 15 years on. I have two newer Logo racks on my local use bikes. Picked up on sale for about £25 each. Think the shop was discontinuing it's touring range or something.
The link above says the stainless steel rack is "currently unavailable"
The Tubus site only mentions the "Logo" rack is available in "silver", no mention of stainless steel.
The "Cosmo" rack page is prominently proclaimed to be available in stainless steel.
So I don't think the "Logo" rack is available in stainless steel anymore.
But that "Cosmo" rack is looking pretty cool.
I like that "second mounting level"
That leaves the top shelf free from any interference from the panniers.
HelpSingularity is offline  
Old 05-15-23, 10:32 PM
  #12  
irc
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Scotland
Posts: 109

Bikes: Surly LHT, Surly Pacer, Spa Steel Tourer, Kona Kula

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 36 Post(s)
Liked 39 Times in 23 Posts
Tubus stainless low rider in stock here.

https://www.sjscycles.co.uk/carriers...wheels-silver/

Very blingy. The difference in price is low enough I would buy one if I was buying a front rack.
irc is offline  
Old 05-16-23, 05:50 AM
  #13  
Tourist in MSN
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 10,578

Bikes: 1961 Ideor, 1966 Perfekt 3 Speed AB Hub, 1994 Bridgestone MB-6, 2006 Airnimal Joey, 2009 Thorn Sherpa, 2013 Thorn Nomad MkII, 2015 VO Pass Hunter, 2017 Lynskey Backroad, 2017 Raleigh Gran Prix, 1980s Bianchi Mixte on a trainer. Others are now gone.

Mentioned: 45 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3175 Post(s)
Liked 1,263 Times in 993 Posts
Originally Posted by HelpSingularity
...

Tubus Nova Low-Rider Front Rack (discontinued)
The black painted version of the above was called the Ergo, also discontinued. I found it to have more adjustability in mounting to get the horizontal bar horizontal because you had two choices of where to mount the horizontal bars on the hoop, but only one choice with the Tara.

I have an Ergo and it is a great rack. Shown below, plus I also have the small Nashbar canti brake post mounted mini-platform rack on that bike too. Bummer that the Ergo is discontinued.



Disregard the fitting on the top of the hoop, I had a battery powered headlamp that I could attach there. Photo is over a decade old.
Tourist in MSN is offline  
Old 05-16-23, 06:33 AM
  #14  
pdlamb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: northern Deep South
Posts: 8,497

Bikes: Fuji Touring, Novara Randonee

Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2375 Post(s)
Liked 1,691 Times in 1,065 Posts
Originally Posted by HelpSingularity
That leaves the top shelf free from any interference from the panniers.
You call it interference, I call it lateral bracing for the tent/sleeping pad.
pdlamb is offline  
Old 05-16-23, 09:48 AM
  #15  
HelpSingularity 
Full Member
 
HelpSingularity's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2022
Location: San Diego, California USA
Posts: 282

Bikes: 1974 Masi GC, 1982 Trek 728 (aka 720), 1992 Trek Multitrack 750

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 102 Post(s)
Liked 163 Times in 107 Posts
Originally Posted by pdlamb
You call it interference, I call it lateral bracing for the tent/sleeping pad.
Yup, if it all fits in between.
HelpSingularity is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell or Share My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2023 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.