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I'm curious - why frame bags versus water bottle cages?

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I'm curious - why frame bags versus water bottle cages?

Old 05-21-24, 08:13 AM
  #151  
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Originally Posted by imi
I guess when everything had to be as light and fast as possible, narrow rims that can’t seat wider tires was the norm. So why design frames with more clearance.

Then came MTB’s and 130, 135mm hubs (where are we at now?)

I still think of 32mm as ’wide’, but have ordered 37mm for my Volpe which should arrive any day soon. 37mm is getting into balloon-tractor-sand territory in my world! 😆
Old road bikes didn’t really come with that narrow a tire. For touring bikes, 1 1/4” (32mm) tires were OEM. “Racier” touring tires were 1 1/8” (28mm). Even race bikes tended towards tires that were 1”(25mm). I recall putting on 3/4” (19mm) razor blades on one of my bikes and those were extremely narrow for the day.
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Old 05-21-24, 08:47 AM
  #152  
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Originally Posted by cyccommute
Old road bikes didn’t really come with that narrow a tire. For touring bikes, 1 1/4” (32mm) tires were OEM. “Racier” touring tires were 1 1/8” (28mm). Even race bikes tended towards tires that were 1”(25mm). I recall putting on 3/4” (19mm) razor blades on one of my bikes and those were extremely narrow for the day.
I never rode 19mm. 23/25 was roadie size, then 28/32 for touring. The only 35mm tires I have are Schwalbe spiky ones for snow and ice. I barely think of that as ”riding”… it’s more ”getting where I have to get to in winter” (I live in Sweden) 🥶
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Old 05-21-24, 08:59 AM
  #153  
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MSN's yellow Thorn bike is 100% a hard tail MTB, yah used for off road mountainous touring. ZERO in common with gravel bike. << Knobby balloon tire 26er with flat bars, steep sloped unisex frame and bungie fork.

Hybrid has become a jack/ joke of all bikes term, completely useless. At first a hybrid was like that Thorn, but with 700 x 37 tires NOT knobby, straight bars, adjustable stem, alu steep sloped frame and 3x8. Now they call any bike not a race bike a hybrid, more likely to have 700 x 28 tires. As in a poor man's triathloner/ randonneur.
Gravel = 650B or 700c 35 to 50 mm mix tread tires, less slope frame, load mounts, 1x or 2x, and drops.

Last edited by GamblerGORD53; 05-21-24 at 10:05 AM.
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Old 05-22-24, 05:30 PM
  #154  
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Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN
I have never understood why road bikes had to have frames that only allowed really skinny tires. Although that did improve slightly over the past decade or two, my road bike that I bought in 2018 has room for 28mm tires without fenders, which was an improvement over the earlier bikes. One positive thing about the gravel craze is that you have a bike that is capable of being a good road bike with clearance for wider tires.
+1, and I agree. However it's good to know, that as tire section height increases, so does fork trail, increasing stability, but also steering heaviness if loaded. Conversely, smaller section height reduces trail and "adds lightness". Which is why, on 20" wheels which tend to be less stabil, if I ordered a Bike Friday intending it for road tires, it might be foolish to order the All-Packa (for its other features) but designed for big cushy tires, then mount smaller tires that will result in less fork trail (assuming the All-Packa has different fork geometry from the New World Tourist).

I have thought for years about a fork with two droputs, for different trail for different tires and loading conditions. Recently someone posted of a bike with a fork with an eccentric dropout insert, to change the trail by simply reversing the insert. Smart. I hope that becomes common in the industry.
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