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How to handle rain on the road

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How to handle rain on the road

Old 10-06-23, 01:59 PM
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Originally Posted by abdon
First of, fenders, long ones. :'(
I think fenders are as important as an anything if you're ever going to ride where it might rain. and not just during the rain, but afterward when the road is still wet. It's a good feeling being able to be out when road surfaces are wet, or there are puddles and you don't have to worry about staying dry.
I always add some type of flap to the front fender that just about touches the ground. It keeps the spray off the cranks and off my toes.

As for wearing rain gear. I don;t bother. I just ride wet. The one downside, though is getting my shoes wet. I tour with SPD shoes that can take a couple days to dry. Some times I'll pack those away and pedal in camp shoes. I have dual-sided pedals so I can do that.
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Old 10-06-23, 03:02 PM
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Originally Posted by Brett A
I think fenders are as important as an anything if you're ever going to ride where it might rain. and not just during the rain, but afterward when the road is still wet. It's a good feeling being able to be out when road surfaces are wet, or there are puddles and you don't have to worry about staying dry.
I always add some type of flap to the front fender that just about touches the ground. It keeps the spray off the cranks and off my toes.

As for wearing rain gear. I don;t bother. I just ride wet. The one downside, though is getting my shoes wet. I tour with SPD shoes that can take a couple days to dry. Some times I'll pack those away and pedal in camp shoes. I have dual-sided pedals so I can do that.
I take it you haven't been on a multi day trip where if you get wet, you' stay wet?

One of my favorite long gone pieces of gear was my kayak touring jacket. Something that is meant to keep you dry while paddling will certainly keep you dry while riding in the rain. For my feet I went with waterproof socks and let the shoes fend for themselves.
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Old 10-06-23, 03:12 PM
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Originally Posted by abdon
I take it you haven't been on a multi day trip where if you get wet, you' stay wet?
.
Or gotten caught at 8,000 when a thunderstorm has rolled in with blowing rain, sleet and even snow as you start a 25 mile descent. Rain gear comes in handy in those situations.
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Old 10-06-23, 03:21 PM
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Originally Posted by abdon
I take it you haven't been on a multi day trip where if you get wet, you' stay wet?

One of my favorite long gone pieces of gear was my kayak touring jacket. Something that is meant to keep you dry while paddling will certainly keep you dry while riding in the rain. For my feet I went with waterproof socks and let the shoes fend for themselves.
I've had some pretty wet weeks through New England and Oregon. Although I don't always wear it, I always have spandex bike clothes with me, They feel the same whether it's raining or I'm just sweating. I don't mind being wet if I'm warm. A wind shell is important.
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Old 10-06-23, 06:29 PM
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There's a big difference between comfort and survival. My complete rain shell (cape, pants, shoe covers, helmet cover, nitrile gloves) weighs 2 lbs (880 g). This is to be worn on top of whatever thickness is necessary underneath to stay warm in cold weather. Trying to pare down my total weight, I've come to the conclusion I won't bring my rain shell with me unless rain with cold weather is possible. Otherwise I'll put my spd shoes in a bag, pedal in rubber sandals and get wet. I also replaced my cotton t-shirts with 100% polyester so they'll have a chance to dry out.
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Old 10-06-23, 07:26 PM
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Originally Posted by L134
]...it is out of production or soon will be due to environmental concerns. Supplies are limited and likely to become more and more so.
Seems so, yes: https://www.******.com/r/Ultralight/...ued/?rdt=48981
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Old 11-18-23, 08:25 AM
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I take it you haven't been on a multi day trip where if you get wet, you' stay wet?

One of my favorite long gone pieces of gear was my kayak touring jacket. Something that is meant to keep you dry while paddling will certainly keep you dry while riding in the rain. For my feet I went with waterproof socks and let the shoes fend for themselves.


I love my kayaking jacket too but it definitely does NOT breathe. My bike jacket is adequate for rain.
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Old 11-18-23, 09:08 AM
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Originally Posted by sbrudno
I love my kayaking jacket too but it definitely does NOT breathe. My bike jacket is adequate for rain.
Anybody ever try riding whilst wearing a wetsuit?

I bought one a year or so back for some planned cool-weather sailing activities that never actually panned out. Been thinking maybe I'll ask if I can try it out at the local indoor lap pool sometime, see if it improves my buoyancy any.
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Old 11-19-23, 09:04 AM
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I can't imagine wearing a wet suit on a bike. I disliked wetsuits for kayaking in cold water (Lake Superior) enough that I eventually bought a Goretex dry suit.

You would sweat in a wet suit, so what good would it be? You would be wet from sweat even when it is not raining.

Last edited by Tourist in MSN; 11-28-23 at 01:52 PM.
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Old 11-19-23, 09:21 AM
  #60  
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One rain jacket. If it rains too much, visit the next restaurant or bar and drink a bottle of wine. Preferible a Ribera de Duero.
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Old 11-19-23, 01:26 PM
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Originally Posted by str
One rain jacket. If it rains too much, visit the next restaurant or bar and drink a bottle of wine. Preferible a Ribera de Duero.
Will do on Tuesday. I have a 20% off coupon at a huge wine outlet that just happens to be on my drive home from work.
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Old 11-19-23, 06:11 PM
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Doug64: I haven’t done long distance touring yet but thinking to start in near future. I see beautiful photos of fleeting moments (as in two of your photos) and feel inspired but then the reality of clammy cold rain that usually lasts days, if not weeks in Washington state, and I become more realistic - and the answer becomes, no thank you, I’ll stay at home until rain stops or pick a different place to go bicycling. 😉

Next year when begin touring, I do have to pick my routes sensibly, based on my own limitations. I would target for only about 50 miles a day. I can do better, may be 65 mikes but I would much rather keep it comfortable. I don’t imagine it will be easy to find good and safe camping spots every 50 or 60 miles. We shall see…

Our area does become very cold in winters, some times getting 10 degree Fahrenheit below zero when I stop bicycling. But for short runs on the top of lakes, it can be fun. I am not adventurous enough to try riding on frozen lakes before seeing cars go on them and most importantly, come back.
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Old 11-26-23, 04:44 PM
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It's a no win situation

You may not get wet from the rain if you put rain gear on, but you certainly will get wet from your own sweat in short order. I learned the purpose of rain gear is NOT to keep you dry, but to keep you warm. BTW no rain gear is really "breathable" - you're going to get wet either from the rain or your sweat. If it is going to rain or is already raining ...consider taking a zero day and staying, preferably, inside.
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Old 11-26-23, 04:48 PM
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Agree completely.. I use sandals for touring and tossed my cycling shoes away a few years ago. When its cold I add a sock liner and waterproof socks.
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Old 11-26-23, 06:34 PM
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I dont agree. Top quality rain gear breathes a LOT better than mediocre stuff especially if you keep it clean. I have a Showers Pass century jacket that has a giant overlapping vent on the back and it both breathes very well and it is quite waterproof.

I am clearly soaked riding in the rain without rain gear but Im sort of normal sweaty riding in my rain gear. Big difference and Id rather not be soaking wet and hypothermic. Rain gear is like almost anything else, you get what you pay for.
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Old 11-28-23, 01:30 PM
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Yesterday I rode with a long underwear top, fleece top, insulated vest, and my rain jacket: and I did not sweat. The temperature was in the mid 30F. A couple days ago it was cool and started raining toward the end of our ride. I was not warm and did not sweat even wearing my rain jacket. A good rain jacket is worth the price.

When it was new 20+ years ago, the faded outside back of my rain jacket was bright yellow like the front and inside trim is today. It is the same jacket I wore yesterday, and it is still breathing and keeping me dry after all these years. However, I use a newer jacket on tours.

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Old 12-02-23, 01:32 AM
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Originally Posted by tcs
Something I think about when evaluating tents: could I pitch this in a rain & have the interior be dry when I get it erected?

The answer is usually 'no', but it's still something I consider.
Take a look at these videos...It really works. You can buy the corner pieces from him, make your own or just use 'O' rings. Some people use paracord instead of strapping.

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Old 12-05-23, 03:21 AM
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Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN
I have often taken full days off due to rain. But that is on trips where I have either an open end on the schedule or where I could adjust my route to make up lost time.

On my Canadian Maritimes trip I took advantage of the wifi on the ferry to PEI, I saw five consecutive days of rain in the forecast. I chucked my plans, made reservations to spend several nights in the hostel in Charlottetown, PEI. It was really nice to have a dry indoor place to sleep during part of those five days of rain. I was only there for two days and three nights, but that made the rain before and after less daunting.

I usually tour in colder regions, thus use rain pants, rain jacket, shoe covers, rain cover for helmet, etc. Full finger gloves can be really nice to have when it is in the 40s (F) and raining. I like yellow lenses on my glasses in rain.



In the photo below, if I recall correctly on this day it was warm enough that I only used a helmet rain cover and rain jacket, no rain pants. Had several days of rain. On the first dry day after those rain days, I wore my campsite shoes on the bike and gave my cycle shoes a chance to rest and air out.


I did the C&O/GAP twice and at times the trail picture above represented a good day of riding😕.
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