Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Touring
Reload this Page >

Miyata 1000 original rear rack

Notices
Touring Have a dream to ride a bike across your state, across the country, or around the world? Self-contained or fully supported? Trade ideas, adventures, and more in our bicycle touring forum.

Miyata 1000 original rear rack

Old 11-06-23, 09:02 AM
  #26  
Senior Member
 
robow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 3,866
Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 595 Post(s)
Liked 281 Times in 192 Posts
The only thing I don't like about my Tubus rack, besides the weight, is the fact that it doesn't have a top cover built in. This can be somewhat easily rectified but since I don't run with fenders, the bottom of my tent bag becomes more easily soiled.
robow is offline  
Old 11-06-23, 10:23 AM
  #27  
gna
Count Orlok Member
 
gna's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: St. Paul, MN
Posts: 1,819

Bikes: Raleigh Sports, Raleigh Twenty, Raleigh Wyoming, Raleigh DL1, Schwinn Winter Bike

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 122 Post(s)
Liked 177 Times in 97 Posts
Originally Posted by cyccommute
Yea, no. There is no way that a welded tubular aluminum rack can carry nearly 3 times what the tubular steel Tubus can carry. I think there is a metric/imperial translation error there which is very common in rack ratings. They likely meant to say that it can carry 70 lbs…which is still a stretch…but translated the 70 into the kilograms column and then did the math to come up with 154 lb. It is likely a good rack but it won’t hold 154 lbs.
I assumed it was an typo-- I thought it was 54kg and they accidentally added a 1. Your explanation makes the most sense.
I agree; 70 lbs. is a stretch, 120 lbs. doesn't seem plausible.

Originally Posted by djb
Re pounds Vs kilos
look up the "Gimli glider" for a story about the air Canada flight in the early 80s? that ended well in the end, but was a eff-up with fueling and a mix-up of Imperial and metric
(wasn't long after we did the official switch, I recall it at school in the 70s)
It's an amazing story--for a time, everything went wrong. Then everything went right. Not only was it soon after the metric/imperial switch, the new planes didn't have a flight engineer so the captain had to figure out the fuel load, which was a new job.
I believe Air Canada originally was going to discipline the crew for the screw up, but they put other crews in a simulator under the same conditions and none of them succeeded in landing the plane, so the suspensions were quietly dropped.

Last edited by gna; 11-06-23 at 10:28 AM.
gna is offline  
Old 11-06-23, 12:07 PM
  #28  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 11,177

Bikes: 1961 Ideor, 1966 Perfekt 3 Speed AB Hub, 1994 Bridgestone MB-6, 2006 Airnimal Joey, 2009 Thorn Sherpa, 2013 Thorn Nomad MkII, 2015 VO Pass Hunter, 2017 Lynskey Backroad, 2017 Raleigh Gran Prix, 1980s Bianchi Mixte on a trainer. Others are now gone.

Mentioned: 47 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3452 Post(s)
Liked 1,452 Times in 1,131 Posts
Originally Posted by djb
Re pounds Vs kilos
look up the "Gimli glider" for a story ...
Great story.

I am surprised that cabin crew screwed that up.

Several years ago NASA sent a space craft to Mars and a contractor prepared instructions for the spacecraft based on the wrong units. Spacecraft was lost. Do an internet search for: Mars Climate Orbiter. Very expensive mistake.

As an engineer in USA that was trained in the 70s and early 80s, I had to learn all the engineering calculations in both SI units and at that time it was called English units, although I called them American units because the Brits were already using the SI system. In my day to day work before I retired, some measurements were in SI units, some in American units, and some were land surveyor units (feet, tenths, and hundredths).
Tourist in MSN is offline  
Old 11-06-23, 12:32 PM
  #29  
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2023
Posts: 136
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 97 Post(s)
Liked 44 Times in 28 Posts
In Canada we've ended up with a perpetual mix of units.

In everyday conversation, weather degrees, road speed and distances are metric but a person's weight and height are still mostly Imperial (british).
I've found that for woodworking, Imperial is far more useful than metric (for reasons probably not obvious to Europeans).
On bikes, everything is metric.
Hardware/construction is mostly Imperial with metric gaining ground.

In other words, it's a mess. But we manage somehow.
Paul_P is offline  
Old 11-06-23, 09:13 PM
  #30  
djb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Montreal Canada
Posts: 13,210
Mentioned: 33 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2735 Post(s)
Liked 969 Times in 792 Posts
Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN
Great story.

I am surprised that cabin crew screwed that up.

Several years ago NASA sent a space craft to Mars and a contractor prepared instructions for the spacecraft based on the wrong units. Spacecraft was lost. Do an internet search for: Mars Climate Orbiter. Very expensive mistake.

As an engineer in USA that was trained in the 70s and early 80s, I had to learn all the engineering calculations in both SI units and at that time it was called English units, although I called them American units because the Brits were already using the SI system. In my day to day work before I retired, some measurements were in SI units, some in American units, and some were land surveyor units (feet, tenths, and hundredths).
"According to NASA, the cost of the mission was $327.6 million ($515.39 million in 2021)"

Ouch
djb is offline  
Old 11-12-23, 10:34 AM
  #31  
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 119
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 63 Post(s)
Liked 28 Times in 18 Posts
Originally Posted by veganbikes
I am probably about to drop the coin on the Tubus Airy rack (which I recognize as slightly crazy) because it is such a neat rack. It weighs less than a pound (12.7oz) and can carry over 57 pounds which is ridiculous.
I found a used Tubus Airy which I put on my Miyata 1000 and I love it. I also had a titanium version of the Tubus Duo low rider racks (this was before Tubus started making a ti version of the Tubus Duo). I love both racks they're lightweight and strong and I've no issues with them.


univega.duder is offline  
Likes For univega.duder:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.