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Help an old tourer understand something

Old 01-18-24, 06:11 PM
  #151  
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Originally Posted by djb
last spring I was out where in the morning it was maybe 5, 6, 7c, low 40s I guess, and it was nice having a warmer top.
I also am a big fan of neckups/buffs, that and a thin beanie make a real difference, and a pair of thin gloves--all stuff that is really compact and doesnt weigh much.
Funny about Louisiana, I've ridden in Mexico a few times and the second time, in january, a big cold front from the states came down even where we were in Oaxaca and at night it got down to 5c . I had to go buy a toque and gloves (toque is a winter hat, Canadian term eh) after a few days--pretty funny for a Canadian with loads of toques and gloves and all that jazz back home.
December 2022 a cold front went all the way to the gulf coast. Right before Christmas, and it lasted for five days with temps averaging in the 20's. My gear was good for about 28 degrees, sleeping. No way I was tangling with that so I holed up in a motel for a few days. I liked riding in 45-60 degree temps, that was my comfort zone. Buffs work great, wish I had brought one.
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Old 01-18-24, 06:18 PM
  #152  
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Originally Posted by chief9245

10,520 mile perimeter tour of the US. 323 days of bliss. Used a combo of Tailfin panniers and rear rack bag, Apidura for the rest. Worked perfectly on a 1x11 10-42 with a 38 tooth chainring. Wheels were 650b"s with 47mm WTB Byways. Rode like a Cadillac on pavement and thousands of miles of trails. Didn't have any issues, no swaying , rattling, or durability issues. The best thing about bikepacking gear is how stout it is. The abuse it can take makes it a great all around choice. Plus there are so many options on capacity, bike location, and mounting options. Definitely a fan of the handlebar "chum buckets". They're so handy they stay on the bike all the time now.
We're huge fans of the Tailfin stuff and were original supporters on the Kickstarter campaign. We've been all over with the stuff on self guided and then on self supported touring and it just works great. The stuff is seriously waterproof - we rode with it for days in constant rain on one trip.

Saw an interesting youtube video by Francis Cade where he took it into the wind tunnel and found the Aeropack on the back by itself actually was 8w faster than without it because it helped fill up the turbulence behind the rider.

Originally Posted by rivers
Tailfin kit just works. It's well thought out, robust, and rock solid on the road and off the road. My aeropack and a 22 litre pannier get used daily for commuting, a few bikepacking trips a year, and anything else I may get up to on my bike.
Yep, we also find it very versatile. Their latest design for their front panniers has me drooling. Nice design.

Originally Posted by john m flores
Some people see the reduced volume as a feature, not a bug. If you have the cash, Camping gear weight and volume have decreased a lot in the past 25 years.
Yes, this. As an example, I had a state of the art 2 person backpacking tent in 1981 and it weighed 4 pounds. Same tent today is going to go to two pounds. Pretty much most of the clothing issues follow in line with that especially insulated gear. While I did that trip with 25lbs per bike fully self supported for 6 weeks, I bet I could cut that down by 30-40% today. I'd posit that that is partly what has made bikepacking practical.
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Old 01-18-24, 06:26 PM
  #153  
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Originally Posted by JohnJ80
We're huge fans of the Tailfin stuff and were original supporters on the Kickstarter campaign. We've been all over with the stuff on self guided and then on self supported touring and it just works great. The stuff is seriously waterproof - we rode with it for days in constant rain on one trip.

Saw an interesting youtube video by Francis Cade where he took it into the wind tunnel and found the Aeropack on the back by itself actually was 8w faster than without it because it helped fill up the turbulence behind the rider.



Yep, we also find it very versatile. Their latest design for their front panniers has me drooling. Nice design.



Yes, this. As an example, I had a state of the art 2 person backpacking tent in 1981 and it weighed 4 pounds. Same tent today is going to go to two pounds. Pretty much most of the clothing issues follow in line with that especially insulated gear. While I did that trip with 25lbs per bike fully self supported for 6 weeks, I bet I could cut that down by 30-40% today. I'd posit that that is partly what has made bikepacking practical.
I picked up the 5 liter packs. I love the Apiduras on the front but the Tailfins go on and come off so easy. Those are for the next trip!
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Old 01-18-24, 06:41 PM
  #154  
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Originally Posted by chief9245
I like the setup, it looks really comfortable. The gray bag setup looks really manageable. And who doesn't like a Surly? Beautiful machines. How do you like the Brooks saddle? I was plagued with saddle sores for years and spent thousands of dollars trying to find a saddle that worked. Was going to try a Brooks but I found a place in California called Infinity bike seat. I picked one up and have never looked back. The best thing about it is it's designed so you don't wear bib shorts, just a pair of compression shorts from Andiamo and a pair of regular shorts over them. It's bizarre looking but the only seat i'll ever use now.
its an old Surly Troll, 26 incher, a nothing special bike with old school 9 spd triple mtb stuff, but I am very fond of the bike. Its been a reliable, stable and competent partner over many trips and countries and when visiting family in Scotland, I really wanted to do an offroad trip in the Highlands, so took a few things like the light panniers and revelate designs harness (should have taken my apidura frame bag too, its so light) and bought some wide XC tires and it was a blast. Super fun little 4 day adventure, mix of on road and dirt, double, singletrack.
I first tried a Brooks maybe in 2010, bought one and figured if I didnt like it Id just sell it, but soon found I had the same opinion as you with your seat. Bought a number of used ones over the years to put on other bikes, just cuz they work for me. I do use padded shorts though, Assos ones. More expensive but they work, and life is too short to have a sore arse or whatever, so I get what you say, when it aint broke, dont fix it, stick with what works.
This Brooks has been on this bike mostly since I got it in 2016 and it is still in great shape.

but hey, they are just bike seats, so whatever works for you.

ps, about cold weather or whatever, its often worth it to just buy stuff you need if weather is cold. I remember in 93 or 94 riding down the west coast, oregon, Cali, in June, and here in Montreal its often rather hot in June, but that trip was pretty cool most of the time. I ended up buying some long warmer socks cuz I had only brought short ones, thinking the weather would be like here.

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Old 01-22-24, 01:36 AM
  #155  
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Originally Posted by djb
chief, and while your setup is great, light, narrow etc and worked for you, it still has a rather limited volume capacity that will have an effect on what one can carry, and depending on the trip and what one person considers important to them for either comfort or whatever.

no right or wrong answers here, but not a lot of volume is a real factor.
Kind of like the gearing question here, your low gear worked for you, but I know from lots of touring in various guises over decades that a lower low and a higher high is better for my knees etc, even with the same total bike weight as yours.

What volumes do your various individual things hold, and what is the total volume together?
Hey djb ... what¿? thats "whole household" touring to me. ))
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Old 01-22-24, 07:17 AM
  #156  
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Originally Posted by str
Hey djb ... what¿? thats "whole household" touring to me. ))
"whole household" touring-- I like that. Funny.
When I went to Scotland last year to visit family, it was handy to have the four panniers because I took a bit more civilian clothes, regular shoes etc for the visiting stuff, plus I had room to take the stuff for doing the little bikepacking trip I did.
Also panniers are still very practical for easy on easy off in trains and having your stuff with you.

but yes, I am slowly figuring out how to reduce the household, and really appreciate less of a household frontal area with big headwinds, especially getting older and even slower than ever.....
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Old 01-22-24, 08:02 AM
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Originally Posted by djb
"whole household" touring-- I like that. Funny.
When I went to Scotland last year to visit family, it was handy to have the four panniers because I took a bit more civilian clothes, regular shoes etc for the visiting stuff, plus I had room to take the stuff for doing the little bikepacking trip I did.
Also panniers are still very practical for easy on easy off in trains and having your stuff with you.

but yes, I am slowly figuring out how to reduce the household, and really appreciate less of a household frontal area with big headwinds, especially getting older and even slower than ever.....
If you're slower than ever (LIKE ME! ..... wind is secondary ;())
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Old 01-22-24, 05:06 PM
  #158  
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Originally Posted by JohnJ80
We're huge fans of the Tailfin stuff and were original supporters on the Kickstarter campaign. We've been all over with the stuff on self guided and then on self supported touring and it just works great. The stuff is seriously waterproof - we rode with it for days in constant rain on one trip.

Saw an interesting youtube video by Francis Cade where he took it into the wind tunnel and found the Aeropack on the back by itself actually was 8w faster than without it because it helped fill up the turbulence behind the rider.



Yep, we also find it very versatile. Their latest design for their front panniers has me drooling. Nice design.



Yes, this. As an example, I had a state of the art 2 person backpacking tent in 1981 and it weighed 4 pounds. Same tent today is going to go to two pounds. Pretty much most of the clothing issues follow in line with that especially insulated gear. While I did that trip with 25lbs per bike fully self supported for 6 weeks, I bet I could cut that down by 30-40% today. I'd posit that that is partly what has made bikepacking practical.
Back in the 60s there were a lot of guys pushing over 110 pounds of gear with less gears! Humans were monsters back then, we're weak in today's world.
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Old 02-01-24, 11:58 AM
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