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Handlebar Bag Stand-Off?

Old 04-26-24, 07:56 PM
  #26  
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This is what I came up with. There's a good 2 inches / 8 cm of clearance over the tire, and nothing rubs. It's ugly, but should do the trick.


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Old 04-26-24, 08:13 PM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by UnCruel
This is what I came up with. There's a good 2 inches / 8 cm of clearance over the tire, and nothing rubs. It's ugly, but should do the trick.
Damn good job, and ugly it ain't. It's actually fairly elegant looking and you did a nice even job of bending the aluminium tubes equally .Nice touch with the clear tubing to stop scratching/rubbing.
And no matter what you think of the aesthetics, it's unseen under your tent and out of sight. You don't need to put the tent bag in a plastic bag or something? Or is the msr bag waterproof?
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Old 04-26-24, 08:20 PM
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Originally Posted by djb
Damn good job, and ugly it ain't. It's actually fairly elegant looking and you did a nice even job of bending the aluminium tubes equally .Nice touch with the clear tubing to stop scratching/rubbing.
And no matter what you think of the aesthetics, it's unseen under your tent and out of sight. You don't need to put the tent bag in a plastic bag or something? Or is the msr bag waterproof?
Thanks. Yes, the bag is waterproof.
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Old 04-27-24, 05:33 AM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by UnCruel
Thanks. Yes, the bag is waterproof.
handy, I kind of figured it would be if it is designed to go right onto bars.
I would watch for pressure point / rubbing spots where the two rods touch the bag, just because they are quite narrow, so "could" abraid the bag material over thousands of cycles of perhaps friction type movement. If you have concerns, you can easily put some sort of something between the two rods and the bag where you see rubbing occurs.
A small piece of foam, whatever is light and would do the job. Again, it would be out of sight under the bag. Foam doesnt absorb water and is perfect for vibrations.
Improvisation is an important thing in bike touring, and you've shown you can already think up of things and make them.
Have a fun trip when you go.
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Old 04-27-24, 08:50 AM
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Originally Posted by UnCruel
This is what I came up with. There's a good 2 inches / 8 cm of clearance over the tire, and nothing rubs. It's ugly, but should do the trick.

ugly? not hardly.
it's gorgeous!
good job.
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Old 04-27-24, 10:31 AM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by UnCruel
This is what I came up with. There's a good 2 inches / 8 cm of clearance over the tire, and nothing rubs. It's ugly, but should do the trick.
... ...
It is only ugly if you have put your tent up so the support is no longer covered up with the tent bundle and some non-bicyclist looks at your bike. The bikers will admire your ingenuity.

You might need to bend the bottom segments out wider if your load is not perfectly balanced for weight in the center, but that is something you could do on a trip if needed.

Very nice.

If it bounces on bumps, you might need to run a strap to the back side of the steerer tube to hold the tent from moving forward. I suggest you bring a strap or piece of cord that it a couple feet long on your trip, just in case it is needed.

You deserve the award for best DIY project for the year for this forum, but unfortunately no such award exists.
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Old 04-27-24, 10:35 AM
  #32  
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oh, perhaps think about putting some layers of electric tape or whatever on the bars under the top curve of the tubes, in case even with the tubing it rubs off some of the black paint on the bars. Easy insurance.
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Old 05-10-24, 10:38 AM
  #33  
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An update, for anyone who is curious. The hanger (and the tent/bag) survived the trip, which turned out to be 6 days of mostly gravel. The hanger deformed a little, but did its job of keeping the bag off of the tire. One of the J hooks relaxed, or unbent a little. Also, the part that hangs over the handlebar bent more and tightened around the handlebar, so it had to be unbent a little to remove it from the bike. The conclusion is that this aluminum is too soft for the purpose. However, when I formed the hanger I had heated the aluminum to bend it more easily without cracking, and I suppose that might have annealed it to make it softer (what little I know about metallurgy is for metals other than aluminum).
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Old 05-10-24, 12:03 PM
  #34  
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Originally Posted by UnCruel
An update, for anyone who is curious. The hanger (and the tent/bag) survived the trip, which turned out to be 6 days of mostly gravel. The hanger deformed a little, but did its job of keeping the bag off of the tire. One of the J hooks relaxed, or unbent a little. Also, the part that hangs over the handlebar bent more and tightened around the handlebar, so it had to be unbent a little to remove it from the bike. The conclusion is that this aluminum is too soft for the purpose. However, when I formed the hanger I had heated the aluminum to bend it more easily without cracking, and I suppose that might have annealed it to make it softer (what little I know about metallurgy is for metals other than aluminum).
What diameter was it? Increasing the size by a 1/16 inch might do the trick.

The one I made which is in a prior post was 5/16 diameter. I did not heat it. The most I have had on it was roughly 5 pounds.
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Old 05-10-24, 12:07 PM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by tourist in msn
what diameter was it?
1/4"
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Old 05-10-24, 12:12 PM
  #36  
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Did you receive that doohickey you bought, would it be better?
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Old 05-10-24, 12:29 PM
  #37  
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Originally Posted by djb
Did you receive that doohickey you bought, would it be better?
No, FedEx lost it. I suspect it would not be better, because without support underneath, I suspect the bag will eventually sag to the point where it makes contact with the tire, no matter how far forward it is held. That's only a supposition, however, since I didn't receive it to test.
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Old 05-10-24, 03:04 PM
  #38  
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Oh well. I'm sure you'll come up with something simple that will work.
Hope you enjoyed the tent
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Old 05-10-24, 05:15 PM
  #39  
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Originally Posted by UnCruel
An update, for anyone who is curious. The hanger (and the tent/bag) survived the trip, which turned out to be 6 days of mostly gravel. The hanger deformed a little, but did its job of keeping the bag off of the tire. One of the J hooks relaxed, or unbent a little. Also, the part that hangs over the handlebar bent more and tightened around the handlebar, so it had to be unbent a little to remove it from the bike. The conclusion is that this aluminum is too soft for the purpose. However, when I formed the hanger I had heated the aluminum to bend it more easily without cracking, and I suppose that might have annealed it to make it softer (what little I know about metallurgy is for metals other than aluminum).
handlebar bar hanger supports are typically made of steel rod.
i used the oldfangled style bar bags that used a steel rod support, with bungee cords down to hooks at the dropouts, for years. carried 5-8 pounds, including SLR camera with 200mm lens, with no issues.
switch material should solve your problem.
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Old 05-10-24, 05:25 PM
  #40  
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Originally Posted by saddlesores
handlebar bar hanger supports are typically made of steel rod.
i used the oldfangled style bar bags that used a steel rod support, with bungee cords down to hooks at the dropouts, for years. carried 5-8 pounds, including SLR camera with 200mm lens, with no issues.
switch material should solve your problem.
I'm almost certain that my super old handlebar bag used aluminium for its support doohickey --but just thicker than this. I lost part of it ages ago so haven't used it in donkeys years, but had no problems with it back in the day.
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Old 05-11-24, 11:39 AM
  #41  
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Originally Posted by saddlesores
handlebar bar hanger supports are typically made of steel rod.
i used the oldfangled style bar bags that used a steel rod support, with bungee cords down to hooks at the dropouts, for years. carried 5-8 pounds, including SLR camera with 200mm lens, with no issues.
switch material should solve your problem.
I noted in post 11 above that I used 1/4 inch steel for my bar bag. And 5/16 aluminum for my small saddle bag. I tested the saddle bag by doing a bike ride (pavement, not a rough trail) with two bottles of water, each a liter, so the water weight was 4.4 pounds, plus the bag weight and any clothing I had in it at the time.

Photo below was the bar bag that I used the steel DIY bracket on. But I was using a digital camara for this photo, one of those new inventions, high end camera with 3 megapixel resolution. Photo from 2010.



That FrontRoller pannier looks very clean, that might have been the first trip it was used on.
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Old 05-13-24, 04:53 AM
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Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN
There is a huge variation in how high people have their handlebars above the front tire.



I once hauled home from UPS, an identical folding frame that had been boxed and shipped, strapped down to the front rack platform and to the tall handlepost behind it.

If I tour, I may carry my tent with my foam sleeping pad rolled around it, strapped *vertically* in front.
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Old 05-13-24, 06:30 AM
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On Apr 26 I said:
.
There is a huge variation in how high people have their handlebars above the front tire. Smaller riders with 700c tires have to worry much more about their luggage and tire clearance up front, and also behind for saddle bags.
Originally Posted by Duragrouch


I once hauled home from UPS, an identical folding frame that had been boxed and shipped, strapped down to the front rack platform and to the tall handlepost behind it.

If I tour, I may carry my tent with my foam sleeping pad rolled around it, strapped *vertically* in front.
Why are you taking this out of context a few weeks later to compare to a tiny wheel bike when the issue clearly was smaller riders with smaller size 700c bikes have much less room between their handlebar and tire to hang stuff bikepacking style than larger riders with larger size frames?

Another person added to my ignore list.
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Old 05-13-24, 11:21 PM
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(above) It was intended as a mild joke, only because you said "huge variation", yes there is. No malice intended. Sincerest apologies.

I like your posts. High value.
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Old 05-15-24, 03:10 AM
  #45  
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Originally Posted by Duragrouch
(above) It was intended as a mild joke, only because you said "huge variation", yes there is. No malice intended. Sincerest apologies.

I like your posts. High value.
I found it amusing too
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