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A Race Bike for Touring?

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A Race Bike for Touring?

Old 07-03-06, 12:44 AM
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Comatose51
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A Race Bike for Touring?

I have a spare bike, a Cannondale R700, that I want to use for touring the Netherlands with my friends in September. Is a race bike suitable for touring? How do I tell if I can mount a rear rack on it?

Also, I need a way to safely ship my bike. Do they make special cardboard boxes for shipping bikes? I could get a hardcase but I have nowhere to put it once I'm in the Netherlands. Performance sells http://www.performancebike.com/shop/....cfm?sku=20104 Is that good enough?

Thanks. Total newbie to touring here.

Last edited by Comatose51; 07-03-06 at 01:01 AM.
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Old 07-03-06, 12:57 AM
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I think you need a seat post rack. That's what I needed to use. You need the kind with pannier support. I was pretty disappointed that I needed to get a seatpost rack because I think they are pretty lame but it worked out alright. The one I got could only hold 25 pounds but all my stuff is under 25 pounds.
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Old 07-03-06, 01:08 AM
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what are your plans for accomodations?
if you're planning on staying in youth hostels or hotels, there are rear racks that mount off of your seat post. they are sturdy enough to hold your clothes, rain gear, a few tools and a book, etc.
if you're planning on camping, they aren't strong enough to also hold, tent, sleeping bag, stove, fuel, etc.
but with a few tools (drill, hack saw, file, pliers, etc.) you can fashion some bolt-on clamps to attach a regular rack to your seat stays. it may not look pretty, but it's a pretty simple and straight-forward enough job. wander around a hardware store or a marine hardware store. just be sure to wrap your stays with some old inner tube or rubber sheet so you don't mess up the paint job.
as far as boxing your bike, you can usually get an old box from your bike shop with enough advance notice. airlines also have bike boxes. apparently, on some airlines, you can just roll your bike in, turn the handle bars sideways, take off the pedals, and put it in a special bag they have. do a search for other threads on boxing your bike. also on airlines.
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Old 07-03-06, 01:08 AM
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Mostly you need braze on's that will support a heavy duty frame. Is the bike frame suitable for heavy loads. Other options , a trailer. THink a race bike might accomdate that. Unless you can fit all your stuff in a backpack?
Never have found a way of shipping a bike cheaper than your airlines. I looked into shipping my bikes on UPS. Redicilious, could almost purchase a new bike for their charge. The downside of airlines, they often mistreat bikes and their insurance against loss or damage is useless.
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Old 07-03-06, 01:27 AM
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Originally Posted by cyclezealot
Mostly you need braze on's that will support a heavy duty frame. Is the bike frame suitable for heavy loads. Other options , a trailer. THink a race bike might accomdate that. Unless you can fit all your stuff in a backpack?
Never have found a way of shipping a bike cheaper than your airlines. I looked into shipping my bikes on UPS. Redicilious, could almost purchase a new bike for their charge. The downside of airlines, they often mistreat bikes and their insurance against loss or damage is useless.
If I ship it via the airlines, what should I box it in? Would a soft case do it?
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Old 07-03-06, 01:28 AM
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Originally Posted by philso
what are your plans for accomodations?
if you're planning on staying in youth hostels or hotels, there are rear racks that mount off of your seat post. they are sturdy enough to hold your clothes, rain gear, a few tools and a book, etc.
if you're planning on camping, they aren't strong enough to also hold, tent, sleeping bag, stove, fuel, etc.
but with a few tools (drill, hack saw, file, pliers, etc.) you can fashion some bolt-on clamps to attach a regular rack to your seat stays. it may not look pretty, but it's a pretty simple and straight-forward enough job. wander around a hardware store or a marine hardware store. just be sure to wrap your stays with some old inner tube or rubber sheet so you don't mess up the paint job.
as far as boxing your bike, you can usually get an old box from your bike shop with enough advance notice. airlines also have bike boxes. apparently, on some airlines, you can just roll your bike in, turn the handle bars sideways, take off the pedals, and put it in a special bag they have. do a search for other threads on boxing your bike. also on airlines.
I'm thinking about staying at hostels, etc. All my stuff might by under 25, especially if I carry some of it on my back. I don't know, never tried this before.
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Old 07-03-06, 01:43 AM
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Comatose. Depends upon the airlines. Some baggage handlers, I swear hate bicycles. Other local tell me that. It would be nice if one could find insurance to cover loss. I could find none. TO be absolutely safe your need a hard case.
I've transported bikes to Europe via airlines four times. Twice my bikes suffered from minor damage. Once my bike went on to Tahiti for a week without me. But, it found it's way home to me somehow.
I have usually used a bike box. Pack it well. I have wrapped my bike with sleeping bags. Still had to replace spokes, at the very least.
Could one find a way to put spacers with a soft box to keep the box from being crushed. That might help. And expect inspectors to rip your bike box apart anyway.
In spite of all the hassles, I much prefer to take my own bike along instead of rent some piece of crap.
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Old 07-03-06, 01:54 AM
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Originally Posted by Comatose51
I'm thinking about staying at hostels, etc. All my stuff might by under 25, especially if I carry some of it on my back. I don't know, never tried this before.
The Delta Universal rack that I bought came with P-clamps that will allow you to mount it to the seat stays on a bike that doesn't have braze-ons.
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Old 07-03-06, 03:04 AM
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You wont need much luggage for hostel touring. A bar bag and large Carradice style saddlebag should suffice. If you take a backpack, keep the heavy items on the bike.
You may get days of cool rain in Sept although mostly it is warm and dry. Do you need to fit fenders?
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Old 07-03-06, 09:23 AM
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I have put a rack on my Lemond that works really well. It's a Tubus Fly. It mounts on the QR with a special adapter and attach's to the brake pivot nut up top. It's small, light (~350 g) and strong, rated for 40 lbs. The adapter that mounts on the QR also moves the rack back for heel clearance which is an issue when using panniers (the chain-stay length of road bikes is often less than on touring bikes). You can put a pair of panniers on it and/or a bag on top. Available from Wayne at the http://www.thetouringstore.com/

Avoid the seat post racks on a road bike. They will put too much force on the seat post (will damage CF and maybe break it), are heavy for the amount of weight they carry and tend to sway unless clamped on really tight.

Light-weight touring is your only option. Loaded touring is not suitable for light-weight road bikes, neither the frames nor the wheel-sets are built for it.
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Old 07-03-06, 03:22 PM
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Old Man Mountain ( www.oldmanmountain.com ) also makes racks that attach via the quick release. You'll need to use p-clips at the top and they will supply those if you let them know you need 'em when you order.
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Old 07-03-06, 05:39 PM
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No matter what rack you use, but especially if you use a seatpost rack (which you have to clamp down far tighter than seems necessary), keep your load light. Pick clothing you can rinse at night and carry woolite, REALLY consider your tool selection, and make lots of trips to the post office to use the scale. Check out http://www.onebag.com/ , which is for non-bike trips but the tips apply to your situation, too.

If you're going to be getting off the bike a lot and touristing, consider ditching your bike jerseys for synthetic button-down shirts; REI makes some that look really dressy but have hidden zip-open vents all over. Shoes are also a real killer for both weight and bulk so you might want to use mountain bike shoes and just carry a cheap pair of flip-flops for hostel showers.
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Old 07-03-06, 11:22 PM
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Originally Posted by bccycleguy
I have put a rack on my Lemond that works really well. It's a Tubus Fly. It mounts on the QR with a special adapter and attach's to the brake pivot nut up top. It's small, light (~350 g) and strong, rated for 40 lbs. The adapter that mounts on the QR also moves the rack back for heel clearance which is an issue when using panniers (the chain-stay length of road bikes is often less than on touring bikes). You can put a pair of panniers on it and/or a bag on top. Available from Wayne at the http://www.thetouringstore.com/

Avoid the seat post racks on a road bike. They will put too much force on the seat post (will damage CF and maybe break it), are heavy for the amount of weight they carry and tend to sway unless clamped on really tight.

Light-weight touring is your only option. Loaded touring is not suitable for light-weight road bikes, neither the frames nor the wheel-sets are built for it.
we must be the same person, I have a rack on my lemond from Wayne as well.
Awesome guy, great rack and never a problem.
Didn't even scratch the paint.
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