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-   -   Touring/luggage suggestions for CF bike? (https://www.bikeforums.net/touring/225868-touring-luggage-suggestions-cf-bike.html)

mark754 09-05-06 06:03 PM

Touring/luggage suggestions for CF bike?
 
I have a Giant OCR C2 carbon frame bike that I'd like to use for short, 2 or 3 day trips and was wondering what my options are, as far as mounting a rack/panniers or other types of luggage. I think about 1 to 1.5 cubic feet of storage would be more than enough. There are no eyelets on the frame and I'm leery of seatpost-mounted racks (they'd put a lot of stress on the seatpost). I'd prefer not to use a backpack, for comfort reasons.

Perhaps a handlebar bag? Does anyone know of one that's fairly aerodynamic and won't create a lot of drag? I'd appreciate any other suggestions as well.

Thanks!

8bit 09-08-06 10:45 AM

Ortlieb makes some decent handlebar bags with some of the best attachment mechanisms around- you don't have to fiddle with velcro straps every time you leave your bike. However, there's no way to put 1-1.5 ft^3 of storage on the front of your bike and have it be aero. I actually think your best option is to take off the carbon seatpost that I assume you have and get an aluminum one and one of these: http://detours.us/catalog/product_in...cdb9e80f749455

I also assume you're probably going to want a slightly different seat for touring anyway so an entire seatpost swap would be the fastest way to put your bike in 'touring mode'.

I have a non-expandable high tail and it's absolutely excellent for brevets and point-to-point rides where all I have to carry is food, maps, jacket, lock, and a rubik's cube. Unfortunately, I use a tiny frame and I can barely tilt the regular high tail off the clip when I want to remove it, but as long as you're not short the attachment system is super. It beats the crap out of a clamp-on seatpost rack for small loads and I would bet that with some creativity or a small handlebar bag you'll be able to fit all your stuff for a weekend tour in there.

MichaelW 09-08-06 10:55 AM

Saddlebags are the way to go.

Tom N. 09-18-06 10:18 PM

I have exactly the same dilemma. I'm (probably) about to buy a Specialized Roubaix as my speedy-fast machine - I am keeping my tourer for serious multi-week stuff though. However, i amy well want to do a three day "light tour" on the Roubaix from time to time. It has no rack eyelets, but I presume one can get clamps with which to attach racks. Is this correct?

The idea would be to have the rear rack with a rack-top bag, or perhaps just one rear side pannier - carrying say about 10kg of stuff max. Has anyone had any experience with such a set up? Can carbon framed bikes handle this?

Any thoughts/experiences appreicated.

zonatandem 09-18-06 10:26 PM

I have a custom Zona c/f tandem; had the builder also build us a one-of c/f rack that attaches to the ti canti bosses and ti rear dropouts. Carry an expandable trunk rack for hauling odds and ends, like stuff from grocery store or bakery. Pricey, but works great.

markf 09-19-06 12:03 AM

I agree with 8bit, Ortlieb handlebar bags are extremely well made and so are all their other products. I'm not sure I'd want to cram everything I needed for a 2-3 day trip into a bag on my handlebars, though, I think it would make the bike steer funny.

Jandd (and possibly a few other companies make really nice seat bags in a range of sizes that will go onto any saddle. Rivendell and Carradice make seat bags in a wider range of sizes that require loops on your saddle (a la Brooks saddles) or there are adaptors available that let you mount these bags on saddles without loops. Wallingford Bicycle Parts, Peter White Cycles and possibly a few other places carry these adaptors. The Jandd bags are really nice modern nylon bags with zippers, well made, sturdy, and reasonably light. The Carradice and Rivendell bags are beautiful old school canvas and leather contraptions, very sturdy but a bit on the heavy side. The bigger Carradice and Rivendell bags are HUGE, you could go cycle camping with them.

valygrl 09-19-06 07:59 AM

Old Man Moutain makes some racks that mount to your axle, taking the weight off your frame. My friend used one of their front racks on his mountain bike for a 6-day trip we took together, and was very satisfied with the rack. That way you can use whatever panniers you want, and it keeps the weight lower, which should be better for handling.

flipped4bikes 09-19-06 08:26 AM


Originally Posted by valygrl
Old Man Moutain makes some racks that mount to your axle, taking the weight off your frame. My friend used one of their front racks on his mountain bike for a 6-day trip we took together, and was very satisfied with the rack. That way you can use whatever panniers you want, and it keeps the weight lower, which should be better for handling.

+1 for the OMM axle-mounted racks. Excellent customer service, high quality product. And I recommend Arkel panniers t-28s for the size you want. I use them primarily for commuting and front panniers. Not sure what you are carrying, but that's not a lot of room. I also have the t-42s, and I love those.

vik 09-19-06 12:00 PM

A Carradice saddle bag would work - they have some largish ones.

http://www.carradice.co.uk/


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