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Winterizing a touring bike

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Winterizing a touring bike

Old 09-12-06, 08:07 AM
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guruguhan
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Winterizing a touring bike

Hello,

I have another question - I might be riding my bike (Cannondale T800 2006 still stock components though I'll be buying a Brook's saddle soon) this winter and was wondering what upgrades I might consider doing. This will be for city riding primarily (during the winter). How many would suggest I get a modestly priced second bike instead?

Thanks for the help
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Old 09-12-06, 08:40 AM
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Winter where?
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Old 09-12-06, 12:01 PM
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sorry...Toronto, Canada
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Old 09-12-06, 01:19 PM
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How can I find out the maximum sized tire that can fit on a 2006 Cannondale T800?
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Old 09-12-06, 02:48 PM
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are you talking about tire width? if so, it depends on your rim. this is a good chart.
http://www.sheldonbrown.com/tire-sizing.html
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Old 09-12-06, 04:50 PM
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If you don't have fenders, get them - it'll keep snow and muck off your brooks.
Oh, and your back too, but most importantly off your brooks :-)

That's the only thing I've done for winter riding, just try to rinse the salt and snow off if you can (but don't soak it if it will be outside - don't want ice on the rims and in the cables)

Most of the difference in winter riding is clothing - gloves and face, just remember not to wear too thick a jacket - you heat up a lot riding in snow.
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Old 09-13-06, 10:08 AM
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Clean and wax the frame so dirt and salt will fall off more easily.
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Old 09-13-06, 02:10 PM
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Thanks everyone

Does anyone switch to a more nubby tire in the winter? The tire that comes with the Cannondale is [Michelin Transworld City w/Puncture Protector, 700 x 35c, Reflective]. Should I look at upgrading this tire before a long tour? Thanks again
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Old 09-14-06, 07:26 PM
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is there anything you need to do to protect your chain, cassette, brakes, etc.? granted, i live in the mid-atlantic states (we rarely ever reach 0F, usually 10F-15F as a low for the night. not a whole lot of snow) so i usually just bundle up. still, i'd hate to be on a short tour, with my bicycle parked outside all night long, and wake up to find shifters frozen or similar problems because i didn't know how to properly protect them against the elements.
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Old 09-14-06, 08:25 PM
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Be sure to Proofide the underside of your saddle.
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Old 09-14-06, 08:42 PM
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Consider studded tires for riding on snow and ice.
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Old 09-15-06, 06:24 PM
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Fenders and mudflaps are essential to keep you and your drivetrain clean.

As for tires, it's personal.
Studded tires will allow you to cycle more aggressively without having to worry about ice ruts, tramway tracks and black ice. On the other hand they weight a lot (i.e. good training) and are a bit noisy. Don't get anything but Nokians because all others use steel studs that wear down very quickly on asphalt. The "low stud count" Hakkapelliitas are plenty for commuting.

- Smooth-rubber knobbies are quite good in snow or sleet, but you have to ride them more carefully if you fear there is ice on the road.

The ideal solution also depends on the distance you travel and whether or not you want to walk or take the bus on nasty days. Other options include:
– Studs in front and knobby on the rear wheel, giving you less drag and most safety benefits.
– Knobbies on the front and rear wheels, with an extra wheel equipped with a studded tire. That way, you ride most of the time with knobbies, but you switch the front wheel when snow or ice is expected.


I'm in Montréal. I have commuted for many years using Specialized Cyclocross knobbies (700x37) and Continental Mount&Ground. Last year I had Nokian Hakkapelliittas on my commuter bike (used every day, but mostly for distances lower than 10 km) and knobbies on my touring bike (used for longer distances... but not when the weather is nasty).
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Old 09-15-06, 08:51 PM
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Yes yes yes get another "winter bike". Your shiny new Cannondale will thank you in the spring. Road grime, salt and sand . . .

Here in Vancouver the roads are wet all the time. Fenders and mudflaps are basic to your comfort and oil your chain very frequently.

Speaking of comfort, its all in having the right gear to keep warm and dry.
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Old 09-16-06, 06:12 PM
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Rock on...thanks everyone!
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