Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Touring
Reload this Page >

rocky mountain sherpa 30

Notices
Touring Have a dream to ride a bike across your state, across the country, or around the world? Self-contained or fully supported? Trade ideas, adventures, and more in our bicycle touring forum.

rocky mountain sherpa 30

Old 08-06-07, 12:29 PM
  #101  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 177
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by kipibenkipod
Thanks.
Sorry to bother you with this, but I'm 6' and 34'' inseam, and I currently have 55cm trek that are too too small for me. After reading the sizing article of rivendell I really considering moving to 60cm frame.
Is the 55cm idea came from regular fitting at LBS's? They tend to calculate smaller. I got 54 and 56 when they measure me at some LBS's.
no worries - it was reading these posts that made me think the 55cm was right. i ride a 58cm road bike and it has a true 58cm top tube. although i use a 100mm stem bc the top tube is a bit too long for me. i think the top tube is the most important measurement on the bike - however, for some strange reason, bike sizes are typically quoted by seatube size. i woud focus on the toptube measurement if i were you. 55cm in a trek bike def sounds small bc they typically have smaller top tubes (relative to other bikes). each bike has their own unique geometry.

off the bat i'd say a 57-58cm frame seems right for you (again, depending on the specific geometry the model of bike you buy)

would you say you have a short/long torso and/or arms?
jignall is offline  
Old 08-06-07, 01:34 PM
  #102  
Got an old Peugeot
 
kipibenkipod's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: I'm from Israel
Posts: 642

Bikes: I had a Trek 1200

Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by jignall
no worries - it was reading these posts that made me think the 55cm was right. i ride a 58cm road bike and it has a true 58cm top tube. although i use a 100mm stem bc the top tube is a bit too long for me. i think the top tube is the most important measurement on the bike - however, for some strange reason, bike sizes are typically quoted by seatube size. i woud focus on the toptube measurement if i were you. 55cm in a trek bike def sounds small bc they typically have smaller top tubes (relative to other bikes). each bike has their own unique geometry.

off the bat i'd say a 57-58cm frame seems right for you (again, depending on the specific geometry the model of bike you buy)

would you say you have a short/long torso and/or arms?
I have long torso.
Keep in mined that my Trek was for Triathlon, and I bought it as size 56. Measuring the seat tube got me to 55cm, so Trek are smaller in size. Trying to ride my friend Specialized 57 felt better. But when we talk about touring bike, I think the size should be bigger, but I'm not really sure. Rivendell say that bigger the frame the top tube get smaller. This is because the angle of the fork. This is good for a touring bike, because you will be in upper position, thus more comfort.
kipibenkipod is offline  
Old 08-09-07, 08:03 AM
  #103  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 177
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Guys - Re the 2006 Sherpa I ordered, I'm finding the sizing confusing. I was told I was getting a 55cm; however, the frame sticker said 21.0", which I found confusing. If you own a 2006 Sherpa can you please let me know what frame size you got and what the frame sticker said?

Thanks in advance.

Jeff
jignall is offline  
Old 08-10-07, 01:47 PM
  #104  
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Boulder, CO
Posts: 11
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts


My Sherpa, not quite stock.
jcsoc is offline  
Old 08-10-07, 08:11 PM
  #105  
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 22
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by jignall
Guys - Re the 2006 Sherpa I ordered, I'm finding the sizing confusing. I was told I was getting a 55cm; however, the frame sticker said 21.0", which I found confusing. If you own a 2006 Sherpa can you please let me know what frame size you got and what the frame sticker said?

Thanks in advance.

Jeff
The 21" is the 55CM, I have the 50CM and the sticker says 19", you got the right one if the bike fits, lol, good luck
eos30d is offline  
Old 08-11-07, 10:59 PM
  #106  
Zen Master
 
Miles2go's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Tucson, AZ
Posts: 999

Bikes: Cervelo R5 - SuperSix

Liked 89 Times in 42 Posts


It's done. I've taken this bike to Alaska and tried beating it to death over 700 miles with a brutally heavy load. The first 450 miles were with the Adventure Cycling Association on tour with 15 others. Many lifted the bike and gasped at the weight. Nearly all of them saw me routinely aiming for the worst sections of road I could find and usually at high speed. Somewhere around 200 miles of this tour was on unpaved surface with washboard, pot holes, loose rock, embedded rock, mud, gravel and loose dirt. I rarely slowed down for anything rough and descended the Denali Highway's unpaved Mclaren pass sailing along at 38.5 mph, and loving every minute of it. We saw a lot of rain in addition to the conditions I've already mentioned. I never cleaned any part of the bike or drive gear. I simply added oil to the chain following days in the rain.

The route covered was from Anchorage, up to Paxson, across the mostly unpaved Denali Hwy to Cantwell, up to the entrance of Denali National Park where the ACA group ended their tour, aside from one that continued to Fairbanks. My wife and I then rode 85 miles into the park on the mostly unpaved Park Road. From there we took the bus out and train back to Anchorage. And lastly two additional riding days to Seward.

My 2006 Sherpa was stock except for the following:
Chain Rings: 48/38/24 (just the rings were changed)
Saddle: Brooks B-17
Fenders: Planet Bike
Tires: 42-622 or 42x700c Continental Top Contact with appropriate tubes.
Racks: Front, Jandd Extreme - Rear, Tubus Cargo
Computer: Cateye Astrale

The reason I threw everything I could at this bike is because I wanted to really see what kind of value it was. Would the hand-built wheels hold their true under such brutal conditions? Would the frame design be stable when pushed with over 100 pounds in total bike weight? Was this touring bike as good as I thought it was?

So how did it do? Nearly flawless! This is an incredible deal in a touring bike. Better than I initially believed.

The bike has rock solid handling and steering at any reasonable speed and is a pure joy to climb with. My load distribution changed often as we were carrying food and gear for the whole group. In addition to that I had a heavy Bear Vault (bear proof canister) loaded with our own supplies mounted high on the rear rack. Never a single shimmy or any other negative feedback from the bike.

I rarely ever looked at the wheels because the bike kept riding smoothly. There were a couple of huge hits the rear wheel took that I thought would surely take it out of true. One transferred enough energy to nearly send me over the bars. When the tour was all over except for the packing, I turned the bike over in the driveway of the B&B we were staying at and spun the wheels up. Just as straight and free from hop as they were when I got the bike. How sweet it is!

Like I said, nearly flawless. Just one little issue. With the big tires and fenders mounted and while using my size 11 Shimano Sandals I have a bit of toe overlap with the front fender. This is a minor annoyance that poses no real impact. This might be eliminated by using different tires and/or shoes, though it’s not enough to have me changing anything. If anything, I may go to even bigger tires (47mm) and wider fenders.

The shifting was perfect with the different chainrings aside from me needing to move the front derailleur a bit and retighten its cable. I've always used barcon or bar end shifters on my touring bikes until this tour. I grew to really like the brifters, especially over Alaska's rolling terrain. I know the niceties of having a friction mode but also know that this setup lived through a lot without the need for any adjustments after being properly setup. And I was shifting more often since I typically ride with my hands on the hoods.

The sad news is that given the nature of this tour, with several plane, bus and train transports; my wonderful red paint has taken on a few scratches. Hey it's a touring bike though and this is why I always try to urge folks to get a bike they're not going to be so worried about. IMHO touring rigs are best considered tools used to get it done. That said, the paint job itself is very well done and durable.

So, ridden hard and put away wet on many nights. This one has certainly earned its keep. Are you listening Rocky Mountain Bicycles? Please keep up the good work!



A closer look at the machine. Huge (deep) Arkel EX-R Expeditions on the front, which are no longer made. Only clean spot on the bike is under the Alaska Mountaineering and Hiking sticker that I put on the frame in Anchorage.

Cheers.
__________________
Ron - Tucson, AZ

Last edited by Miles2go; 08-12-07 at 12:16 AM.
Miles2go is offline  
Old 08-12-07, 02:18 PM
  #107  
Got an old Peugeot
 
kipibenkipod's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: I'm from Israel
Posts: 642

Bikes: I had a Trek 1200

Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Man, thanks for the review.
One question: Will the bike take 47 tires with fenders ?
kipibenkipod is offline  
Old 08-13-07, 07:08 PM
  #108  
Zen Master
 
Miles2go's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Tucson, AZ
Posts: 999

Bikes: Cervelo R5 - SuperSix

Liked 89 Times in 42 Posts
From a width standpoint it should be able to take 50mm tires and fenders but I'm really aiming for something that truly measures out to about 45mm wide inflated. I'm thinking I'll need something called 47mm to reach that point. Height is the only thing I haven't looked at but imagine that won't cause a problem with fenders.

So I'd planned to email or call RMB after my tour and see if they'd change the crankset for 08 to something with a 48t big ring. Not ideal but a good compromise and better than the original rings. Really though, for the buyer to change the rings is very simple and a front der. adjustment is all that's needed beyond the new rings. Anyway, I couldn't find an email address on RMB's site so I'll just call them tomorrow. I did however come across something that I enjoyed hearing about the company, on their "Philosophy" page. Here's the latter part of it.


"When you get on a Rocky Mountain and take it for a spin you'll realize we practice what we preach. Building bikes for all types of riders which meet our standards is why we've developed four independent, purpose-built full suspension systems. It's why our R&D facility is located right beside our factory. It's why we're not a mass production operation. We hand build our bicycles and all of our wheels. We also invest heavily in quality control and high construction standards. It's why we offer everything from steel hardtails to 9-inch suspension downhill rigs. And, it's why we use name brand quality tubing and name brand components to build our bikes.

Even though we're bigger than we were when we started 21 years ago, we still employ the same practices, the same hands on approach we did then. It's all still right here in Vancouver, British Columbia, and because of that, subject to the constant scrutiny of all our employees. The noises from our factory can be heard right in our head offices.

We are a semi-custom bike manufacturer. We're not huge and were not trying to be. We're not pumping out hundreds of thousands of bikes a year. It's because of this we can take our time to ensure that every Rocky Mountain is the best it can be. So, if you want a quality ride from the tubing right through to the wheels, this is where you belong. Bikes built for riders, by riders, in a place where the riding rules."

What's not to like about that? Heck, I wonder if there are any job openings.

Here's another shot from our Alaska tour. Fun roads up there!


Cheers,

__________________
Ron - Tucson, AZ
Miles2go is offline  
Old 11-12-07, 05:37 PM
  #109  
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 38

Bikes: Calfee Tetra, Bontrager Race Lite, Bike Friday Tandem, etc

Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Sherpa in Portland?

I'm a recent Portland, OR transplant, and although in many ways this place is bike-central, nobody around seems to be a Rocky Mountain dealer.

Any suggestions where I could find a 2008 Sherpa 30 nearby?

Thanks,
Dolan
dhalbrook is offline  
Old 11-12-07, 07:09 PM
  #110  
My tank takes chocolate.
 
FlowerBlossom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Olympia, WA
Posts: 6,344

Bikes: Trek 600 series touring bike, Trek 800 hybrid, Bianchi

Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
What's "nearby"?

In Seattle, Greggs Cycle (Greenlake) had some last fall. Call first to see if they have them and if they'd let you test-ride one in the rain. I have one now, so, I haven't checked to see if they are still carrying them. Seattle is about 3 hours by car (no traffic) from Portland. Amtrak also goes to Seattle, and, you pay extra for carrying a bike.
__________________
Feminism is the profound notion that women are human beings.
FlowerBlossom is offline  
Old 11-12-07, 08:40 PM
  #111  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Vancouver, BC
Posts: 150

Bikes: 2008 Turner Spot, Berg Ti Cross, 2011 Karate Monkey

Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I've been searching for a 58cm Sherpa, and dug up a few tidbits to share with others looking at this bike:
1) The 2008 version is now on website. It looks like they haven't changed the colour nor chainring spec. New crankset is the FSA Vero 52-42-30 and it has an 11-32 cassette. Deore hubs on A319 rims are the wheels.

2) Bikes on the Drive here in Vancouver had several Sherpa's in February '07 but won't be carrying the brand for 07/08.

If any of you have seen a 58 in your local shop or in classifieds, please PM me or post up. THanks!
__________________
Just Riding Along
TruckerMike is offline  
Old 11-12-07, 10:08 PM
  #112  
Senior Member
 
ricohman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Saskatchewan
Posts: 2,465
Likes: 0
Liked 6 Times in 5 Posts
I have one on order at my LBS.
They have ordered more than just the one I bought..
Dutch Cycle in Regina.
Which Sherpa? The 30 or the 10?
ricohman is offline  
Old 11-13-07, 05:33 PM
  #113  
My tank takes chocolate.
 
FlowerBlossom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Olympia, WA
Posts: 6,344

Bikes: Trek 600 series touring bike, Trek 800 hybrid, Bianchi

Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by TruckerMike
I've been searching for a 58cm Sherpa, and dug up a few tidbits to share with others looking at this bike:
1) The 2008 version is now on website. It looks like they haven't changed the colour nor chainring spec. New crankset is the FSA Vero 52-42-30 and it has an 11-32 cassette. Deore hubs on A319 rims are the wheels.

2) Bikes on the Drive here in Vancouver had several Sherpa's in February '07 but won't be carrying the brand for 07/08.

If any of you have seen a 58 in your local shop or in classifieds, please PM me or post up. THanks!
Rocky Mountain has a list of dealers/shops across Canada and the USA. Send email to shops on this list and ask if they have one in your size, and if they'd be willing to ship. You can probably also swap out parts.

That's how I got mine.
__________________
Feminism is the profound notion that women are human beings.
FlowerBlossom is offline  
Old 11-15-07, 02:31 PM
  #114  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Vancouver, BC
Posts: 150

Bikes: 2008 Turner Spot, Berg Ti Cross, 2011 Karate Monkey

Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by ricohman
I have one on order at my LBS.
They have ordered more than just the one I bought..
Dutch Cycle in Regina.
Which Sherpa? The 30 or the 10?

Thanks for the tips. I can do special order through my local shops but was hoping to see if others had a Sherpa 30 on the floor. So far, most if not all, shops I've talked to in BC (RMB HQ) are bringing these Sherpa's in on a "special order" basis only (i.e not pre-booking them for the store's 07/08 inventory).
__________________
Just Riding Along
TruckerMike is offline  
Old 11-21-07, 03:01 PM
  #115  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Puget Sound
Posts: 1,982

Bikes: 2007 Rocky Mountain Sherpa 30 (bionx), 2015 Cannondale Synapse Carbon Ultegra

Liked 11 Times in 6 Posts
Wow! LBS's not stocking the Sherpas? Do we have a "classic" touring bike on our hands only a few years after it was introduced? I can see RMB getting out of the touring bike business. They are well known for their mountain bikes but they made one awesome touring bike. I'm glad I have mine! I imagine I'll be riding it for decades.
InTheRain is offline  
Old 11-22-07, 10:36 PM
  #116  
aspiring island dweller
 
spinninwheels's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: island off of an island
Posts: 267

Bikes: Easy Racers GRR, Cannondale T-2000/Rohloff Custom, Cannondale R-700, Custom Fixie/Single Speed, Santa Cruz

Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Miles2go
"When you get on a Rocky Mountain and take it for a spin you'll realize we practice what we preach. Building bikes for all types of riders which meet our standards is why we've developed four independent, purpose-built full suspension systems. It's why our R&D facility is located right beside our factory. It's why we're not a mass production operation. We hand build our bicycles and all of our wheels. We also invest heavily in quality control and high construction standards. It's why we offer everything from steel hardtails to 9-inch suspension downhill rigs. And, it's why we use name brand quality tubing and name brand components to build our bikes.

Even though we're bigger than we were when we started 21 years ago, we still employ the same practices, the same hands on approach we did then. It's all still right here in Vancouver, British Columbia, and because of that, subject to the constant scrutiny of all our employees. The noises from our factory can be heard right in our head offices.
Ron:

I stumbled across this thread and decided to read the first and last page (sorry I didn't take the time to read the whole thing). At one point, earlier this year, I was actually looking at getting a Sherpa. I was looking for something that I could throw a Rohloff into (w/monkey bone), and this was one of my considerations.

Unfortunately, RMB are no longer manufactured in Vancouver (Richmond). Though some of their R&D may still be here, along with a large warehouse - they are assmebled in Quebec. And from what I've heard (from a RMB dealer), some of their frames are actually being made in Europe. I was kind of disappointed to hear that. And I'm not slagging on RMB. They are a fantastic product. But the times they are a changin'.

Anyway, I'm glad you like your Sherpa.

Dave

P.S. My T2000 isn't quite ready to give up the ghost though. I installed the Rohloff (w/torque arm) in that for the time being, just to break it in. I'm looking at getting a custom built frame by an ex-RMB builder here in Vancouver.

Edit: Diesel Dad on page 2, noted Quebec manufacturing. They should update their website.
__________________
Life is either a wild adventure or nothing - Helen Keller

Last edited by spinninwheels; 11-22-07 at 10:49 PM.
spinninwheels is offline  
Old 11-23-07, 08:26 AM
  #117  
Senior Member
 
ricohman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Saskatchewan
Posts: 2,465
Likes: 0
Liked 6 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by spinninwheels
Ron:

I stumbled across this thread and decided to read the first and last page (sorry I didn't take the time to read the whole thing). At one point, earlier this year, I was actually looking at getting a Sherpa. I was looking for something that I could throw a Rohloff into (w/monkey bone), and this was one of my considerations.

Unfortunately, RMB are no longer manufactured in Vancouver (Richmond). Though some of their R&D may still be here, along with a large warehouse - they are assmebled in Quebec. And from what I've heard (from a RMB dealer), some of their frames are actually being made in Europe. I was kind of disappointed to hear that. And I'm not slagging on RMB. They are a fantastic product. But the times they are a changin'.

Anyway, I'm glad you like your Sherpa.

Dave

P.S. My T2000 isn't quite ready to give up the ghost though. I installed the Rohloff (w/torque arm) in that for the time being, just to break it in. I'm looking at getting a custom built frame by an ex-RMB builder here in Vancouver.

Edit: Diesel Dad on page 2, noted Quebec manufacturing. They should update their website.
The Sherpa frame is still hand made in Canada.
That is what the RMB rep has stated to my LBS and to the dealers at the big bike show in Quebec.
Many of the other lower end frames for the MTB's are being outsourced but the Reynlods 853 tube set is still hand made in Canada.
ricohman is offline  
Old 12-22-07, 02:24 PM
  #118  
Zen Master
 
Miles2go's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Tucson, AZ
Posts: 999

Bikes: Cervelo R5 - SuperSix

Liked 89 Times in 42 Posts
It turns out these bikes have more history behind them than what I have found in the past!

I just added several new submissions to The FLT Gallery and among them a bike from Rocky Mountain that will look very familiar, yet it was produced in the mid to late nineties.

See "249 Doug - Touring Guinea - Rocky Mountain Bicycles Route 66"

Doug is the original owner and according to him it's a European version of what was also offered in North America in a 700c version. His is a 26" wheeled model.

What a cool find and this answers some questions about the Sherpa's origin. It's also cool that you can run tires about as wide as Doug has on his Route 66, on the 700c wheeled Sherpa.

There's a fixed-gear Route 66 on ebay BTW, though I'd want more info on its condition or better pictures before I'd bid.

__________________
Ron - Tucson, AZ

Last edited by Miles2go; 12-22-07 at 02:34 PM.
Miles2go is offline  
Old 12-22-07, 03:49 PM
  #119  
Senior Member
 
ricohman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Saskatchewan
Posts: 2,465
Likes: 0
Liked 6 Times in 5 Posts
Very interesting.
Rocky has always listened to the customer base and directed new model or new features towards that end.
To bad they "listened" to the feedback about wanting the frame cleaned up.
That is the reason they deleted the spoke holder and the generator tab on the 08's.
At least that's what Rocky told me when I called them last week asking them why these two features were missing from my new bike!

Last edited by ricohman; 12-22-07 at 07:02 PM.
ricohman is offline  
Old 12-22-07, 05:29 PM
  #120  
Zen Master
 
Miles2go's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Tucson, AZ
Posts: 999

Bikes: Cervelo R5 - SuperSix

Liked 89 Times in 42 Posts
I didn't know they dropped those items from the 08s. That said, I'd give you my generator tab and spoke holders if I could. They don't bother me but I certainly won't need them. I carry Fiber-Fix spokes and simple LED lights to use when needed (rarely so). If this bike were a commuter for me I might like that generator tab. These are just gee-wiz items on a touring bike though.

I'd like to ride one of these Route 66s if I ever come by one. The old bikes have lower grade tubing than the Sherpa's 853 but it would be a fun comparison since there are six or seven years between them.

Congrats on getting your bike. I hope you have a break in the weather and get a chance to ride it.


Originally Posted by ricohman
Very interesting.
Rocky has always lisetn to the customer base and directed new model or new features towards that end.
To bad they "listened" to the feedback about wanting the frame cleaned up.
That is the reasron they deleted the spoke holder and the generator tab on the 08's.
At least that's what Rocky tods me when I called them last week asking them why these two features were missing from my new bike!
__________________
Ron - Tucson, AZ
Miles2go is offline  
Old 12-22-07, 07:08 PM
  #121  
Senior Member
 
ricohman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Saskatchewan
Posts: 2,465
Likes: 0
Liked 6 Times in 5 Posts
I like generators but you are right about LED lights. They last nearly forever on a set of batteries.
The spoke holder is pure old school and I wished my bike had it just for the aethetics if nothing else.
I can carry spokes very easily and Rocky knows this. But it did take me "back in my day"



And I guess wanting internal wiring is out of the question!

ricohman is offline  
Old 12-23-07, 12:26 PM
  #122  
Senior Member
 
Speedo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Boston Area
Posts: 1,998

Bikes: Univega Gran Turismo, Guerciotti, Bridgestone MB2, Bike Friday New World Tourist, Serotta Ti

Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
The revival of this thread, and Richoman's thread have motivated me to try another search for a reasonably local Rocky Mountain distributor. I'm happy to report moderate success. There's a bike shop in Dedham, MA that has the Sherpa 30 listed on their website. When I sent them an e-mail asking if they had any in stock they actually wrote me back! Unfortunately they don't have any in stock, but might get some in the spring. This is a much better result than last year when no Massachusetts distributors even responded.

I'm guessing that this shop would order the right size if I plunked down a deposit. But I'm 6'3" with a 36 inch inseam, so I'm a little worried about fit, and the fact that, despite all the rave reviews, I've never seen one of these bikes "in the flesh".

Anybody out there buy one of the Sherpa 30s blind?

Speedo
Speedo is offline  
Old 12-23-07, 07:46 PM
  #123  
Senior Member
 
ricohman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Saskatchewan
Posts: 2,465
Likes: 0
Liked 6 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by Speedo
The revival of this thread, and Richoman's thread have motivated me to try another search for a reasonably local Rocky Mountain distributor. I'm happy to report moderate success. There's a bike shop in Dedham, MA that has the Sherpa 30 listed on their website. When I sent them an e-mail asking if they had any in stock they actually wrote me back! Unfortunately they don't have any in stock, but might get some in the spring. This is a much better result than last year when no Massachusetts distributors even responded.

I'm guessing that this shop would order the right size if I plunked down a deposit. But I'm 6'3" with a 36 inch inseam, so I'm a little worried about fit, and the fact that, despite all the rave reviews, I've never seen one of these bikes "in the flesh".

Anybody out there buy one of the Sherpa 30s blind?

Speedo
When I went down last week to try out a new Sherpa they mounted a 52.5 and a 55.5 ( I'm about 5'9" with long legs) on the trainers. I got to ride both and it was obvious to me that the 52.5 was the size I needed.
Then they fit me to the bike and took various measurements, and told me to take it home and try it out and they could swap the stem to whatever I needed to be comfortable.
So far I've ridden it (indoors) for about an hour at a time and it feels very nice. But one hour and six hours are two very different things so I may swap the stem for one with a bit more rise. But since I am changing out the seat for a new Brooks I will wait until I can get it on the road.
My advice is this.
When you are going to drop over $1500 on a bike you should have the chance to ride a couple of sizes and your LBS should be ready to spend some time with you to make the bike fit as comfortable as possible.
My local LBS does not charge for swapping stems, seatposts or bars on new bikes (this free service includes the parts).
But when I bought my Nishiki Continental waaay back in 84' I ordered it in and went and picked it up.
It was the best $1100 I ever spent, and that was a lot of money back then!
ricohman is offline  
Old 12-23-07, 09:53 PM
  #124  
Zen Master
 
Miles2go's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Tucson, AZ
Posts: 999

Bikes: Cervelo R5 - SuperSix

Liked 89 Times in 42 Posts
Ricoh has a perfectly good Sherpa to post here and he posts something else. My Thorn has a couple of interesting details... where's that upload button at....

Speedo. There weren't any reviews when I bought mine, without ever seeing one in person and without the benefit of any of the photos in this thread. RMB had one of their typical distant images online and that was it.

In addition to the Sherpa, I've bought a custom Co-Motion, Waterford and my Thorn, sight unseen. They've all fit well enough for me to ride them comfortably all day long. The Sherpa fit a little larger than I expected. I thought it would fit my wife perfectly but she would need a slightly shorter stem on it. It fits me perfectly, as is.

You're interested in the Sherpa for loaded touring?
__________________
Ron - Tucson, AZ
Miles2go is offline  
Old 12-24-07, 10:20 AM
  #125  
Senior Member
 
Speedo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Boston Area
Posts: 1,998

Bikes: Univega Gran Turismo, Guerciotti, Bridgestone MB2, Bike Friday New World Tourist, Serotta Ti

Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by ricohman
When you are going to drop over $1500 on a bike you should have the chance to ride a couple of sizes and your LBS should be ready to spend some time with you to make the bike fit as comfortable as possible.
Well, yeah, you should. Unfortunately, most of the local bike shops are chock-a-block with pure mountain bikes and light-as-a-feather titanium and carbon bikes, but not much in the way of selection in touring bikes. When I talk about mounting racks, and carrying stuff the sales people point to the lone Trek 520 gathering dust in the corner. Not that I'm down on the Trek 520, but I can't seem to fall in love with it!

Originally Posted by Miles2go
Speedo. There weren't any reviews when I bought mine, without ever seeing one in person and without the benefit of any of the photos in this thread. RMB had one of their typical distant images online and that was it.

In addition to the Sherpa, I've bought a custom Co-Motion, Waterford and my Thorn, sight unseen. They've all fit well enough for me to ride them comfortably all day long. The Sherpa fit a little larger than I expected. I thought it would fit my wife perfectly but she would need a slightly shorter stem on it. It fits me perfectly, as is.
Thanks. That's good to know. I'm coming to the conclusion that winging it is what I'm going to have to do.

Originally Posted by Miles2go
You're interested in the Sherpa for loaded touring?
Yes, and no. Mostly no. I'm looking for a general purpose bike that can be used for loaded touring. That may seem strange, but even when I'm not fully loaded I like a bike that can accommodate a rack and fenders. When the weather is fine I can lighten the bike by taking that stuff off, but there's a lot of good riding in the fall and spring that is made much more comfortable by the ability to carry clothes, and be protected by fenders. Also, as I've aged I've found that my knees really, really (really!) prefer touring gears, even when not heavily laden.

I can pretty much count on one week long tour a year, but that's only a fraction of the riding I'll do on it. On the other hand, there's always that cross-country dream!

The Co-Motion Nor'Wester is high on my list. A nearby shop is a big Co-Motion dealer, so I know that they can set me up just fine with that. I'm having a little trouble swallowing the price tag with the thought that a stock bike like the Sherpa will do the job for half the price. On the other, other hand, being 6'3" I've spent my life making too-small frames work for me. Maybe it's time to see what it's like to have a frame that's big enough.

What I really wish is that this stupid Sherpa 30 thread would stop being revived. Then I could put it out of my mind!

Anyway, Merry Christmas to all!

Speedo
Speedo is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Your Privacy Choices -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.