Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Touring
Reload this Page >

Is my Schwinn Voyager a touring bike?

Notices
Touring Have a dream to ride a bike across your state, across the country, or around the world? Self-contained or fully supported? Trade ideas, adventures, and more in our bicycle touring forum.

Is my Schwinn Voyager a touring bike?

Old 08-06-01, 04:16 PM
  #1  
1,520,000
Thread Starter
 
nikos's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: madison, wi
Posts: 676
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Is my Schwinn Voyager a touring bike?

I have a Schwinn Voyager that I had used for the last yr for commuting before picking up a Bianchi road bike. I noticed that wheel end to wheel end the Voyager is much longer than my Bianchi, also its much heavier and appears more sturdy. Its more difficult than I thought in getting use to the change, it almost feels like Im on a childrens bike with my Bianchi, it seems so compact!
nikos is offline  
Old 08-20-01, 07:07 PM
  #2  
Mr. Cellophane
 
RainmanP's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: New Orleans, LA
Posts: 3,037
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Nikos,
I just noticed this post. The Schwinn Voyageur was/is definitely a touring bike! I bought a used one recently from a friend at a bike shop near me. He even had an old Schwinn with a description. The one I have came equipped with 40 spoke wheels to carry the weight of touring gear. The are called Super Champion. Count your spokes. The bike also has all the usual rack and fender eyelets as well as a touring handlebar - a road type bar but sloped upward slightly from the stem outward. Mine is a 10-speed equipped with Shimano 600 components including triple chainwheels and big cogs in the back.

It needs the usual overhauling of bearing groups as well as cables, etc., but is otherwise very sound.
Regards,
Raymond
__________________
If it ain't broke, mess with it anyway!
RainmanP is offline  
Old 08-21-01, 05:35 PM
  #3  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Austin TX Soon to be renamed Lance Armstrong City
Posts: 97
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
In the July issue of Bicycling magazine is a story about a guy who has rode a million miles on his Voyager. He rides constantly, some of it for sponsored events. His annual milage is around 35,000 miles. He uses toeclips, and 700x40c tires, and wears out chainrings, but still continues to ride the Voyager. Just goes to prove that the most important component on a bike is its engine.
Pat O'Malley is offline  
Old 08-21-01, 07:28 PM
  #4  
1,520,000
Thread Starter
 
nikos's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: madison, wi
Posts: 676
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
thanks for the replies, as described above - mine is just the same! Glad to have the option of both bikes. I think when the cold weather hits, it might be nice to slip over to the voyager instead of the racing bike. If it gets to bad, Ill go to the Haro mountain bike. thanks again!
nikos is offline  
Old 12-16-01, 06:14 PM
  #5  
Senior Member
 
mike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Snowy midwest
Posts: 5,391
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
What year is your Voyager? If it was made in the USA, one of it's big advantages is reliability. The older Schwinns were pretty heavy, but they made up for it in reliability.

Of course, for touring, reliability is a BIG benefit.

The Italian bikes are lighter, but they just seem to require a lot of maintanance. I ride a Bottechia for fun, but the frame is a little bit bendy when I put a lot of muscle to the pedals. This fact makes me uncomfortable when considering it for a longer distance tour.

If you can put up with the Schwinn's extra weight, then use if for touring, by all means.

NOTE OF WARNING: The "Made in Taiwan" Schwinns were not nearly as good as the USA or Japanese made Schwinns. I brought made in Taiwan Schwinn Sprint for a Europe tour. Virtually ever part - and I mean EVERY moving component - failed. I limped to the end of the tour in the only remaining gear and left the bike in Germany without any feeling of remorse for the bike.
mike is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.