Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Touring Have a dream to ride a bike across your state, across the country, or around the world? Self-contained or fully supported? Trade ideas, adventures, and more in our bicycle touring forum.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 09-19-07, 12:46 PM   #1
Curiouswill
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Curiouswill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Great Falls, MT
Bikes: 2002? Cannondale Warrior 400r
Posts: 207
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
how to use a road bike for touring?

Hi y'all. I know it have been a while since I have posted in this sub-forum (or anywhere else for that matter) but I have NOT stopped riding and I'm getting better and better now. But unfortunately I've found a bunch of books on touring and are getting some severe itch to go out and touring around colorado. But I do not have the money to buy a touring bike. But I do have a road bike that I've been wondering about using for touring. Is there anything I should do to "convert" it for touring?

I know of a few upgrades that would help me out such as upgrading my double chainwheel to triple. I could alsoreplace the brake pad and have the bike tuned up in general. But should I just replace the wheel for a better one? cause my rear wheel had 3 broken spoke and it have been replaced. Could it save me money if I just replace all of the old spokes? or is it better to replace the whole thing (except the tire I think)? What about tubes? Yesterday I came to the LBS and saw some tube that felt stiff and was pretty thick, I wasn't sure but I thought that it was made for touring or something similar. One thing that I will defidently try to save up for is a BOB trailer. My fave LBD have one of these trailer and I can't help but imagine it on my bike whenever I go out touring lol.

My road bike is a motobecane super(?) mirage with suntour components.

I know that I still ask tons of questions but I have not had much of a chance to go out and meet other cyclist yet and thus have had to learn what I can on my own. Don't worry, I'm going to contact the cycling club around here to see about being able to pay the membership fee later and letting me see what the rides is like there. I'm also trying to get my mountain bike wheel fixed (a bit bent and the spoke nipples is too worn to true the wheel) so I can join the Sno-Jet group for their mountain bike rides. Hopefully everything will straighten out soon.


Sorry I gotta go and check my e-mail since I only have a few monutes left in my library internet session. Hopefully I'll learn something more from here again
Curiouswill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-07, 11:48 PM   #2
kipibenkipod
Got an old Peugeot
 
kipibenkipod's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: I'm from Israel
Bikes: I had a Trek 1200
Posts: 642
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Hi,
I would reccomend to go on a short trips with the bike. Just insure you have a way to go back home if you are stuck. With those trips you will learn what your bike can handle.
I myself have Trek 1200 with 700x23 32 spokes back wheel, which at the start did me some problems with broken spokes. Once I took it to a good shop, no spoke died on me. I think they have tuned the wheel a bit.
I'm a gear head but don't have the money now, so I use what I have. We really enjoyed our last trip, even I had some punctures and very very steep hills which we walked.
Just tune up your bike, and see how they handle in a small tour. Then you will know what you need to upgrade. This will save you money, and will make you learn your bike.

Good luck and nJoy riding.
kipibenkipod is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-07, 03:19 AM   #3
Cave
Slowpoach
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Melbourne, AU
Bikes: Cannondale T800, Northwood tandem, 1970s Gitane fixxed 45x16
Posts: 1,088
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
If you carry lots of stuff your MTB might be more suitable for touring. Travel light and you can use your road bike. Experiment.
Cave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-07, 07:55 AM   #4
nun
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Bikes: Rivendell Quickbeam, Rivendell Rambouillet, Rivendell Atlantis, Circle A town bike, De Rosa Neo Primato, Cervelo RS
Posts: 3,432
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 75 Post(s)
Firstly I'd just really get into riding your road bike and up the mileage. Then go on some over night trips and stay in a motel. For this you'll be able to carry stuff in a saddlebag or a backpack. See if you like it then you can set about upgrading your bike. I'd gear it down by installing a triple, maybe a 110/74 with 46/36/24 rings and a 12/34 cassette, then I'd put some wider rims on, but I expect there's not much clearance on the super mirage, anyway go as big as you can. If you are getting a BOB I think that's all you need to do.
nun is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-07, 08:30 AM   #5
Sigurdd50
Papa Wheelie
 
Sigurdd50's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Madison, Wi
Bikes: Jamis Aurora '02; Takara Medalist (650B)
Posts: 1,472
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
a lot will depend on... a lot of different factors (bleah)
I'm not real familiar with the bike, but if it is a typical road bike, the drailleur might not be able to handle a wide range of gears in the casette (short cage), which means to expand to a 12-34 cassette, one might have to go with a different RD.
The tire clearance has been addressed. HAving at least 700/28's is better for comfort. Fenders are nice, and that restricts your tire choices even more. I had a Felt F-70 for a year and tried a week long supported tour. I crammed 28's under the brakes but just barely. The first couple days were fine, but by the end of the week, I was hurting... mostly because the geometry of a performance bike means a small cockpit... touring bikes have nice relaxed geometry and long wheel base... easy to be on the bike for looooooooong periods of time.

take it out for a couple two day rides and see how you feel
Sigurdd50 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-07, 11:01 AM   #6
staehpj1 
Senior Member
 
staehpj1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Bikes:
Posts: 9,094
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 109 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by nun View Post
Firstly I'd just really get into riding your road bike and up the mileage. Then go on some over night trips and stay in a motel. For this you'll be able to carry stuff in a saddlebag or a backpack. See if you like it then you can set about upgrading your bike. I'd gear it down by installing a triple, maybe a 110/74 with 46/36/24 rings and a 12/34 cassette, then I'd put some wider rims on, but I expect there's not much clearance on the super mirage, anyway go as big as you can. If you are getting a BOB I think that's all you need to do.
Probably all good advice, but there is something to be said for just going on a long tour right off if that is what interests you. I know that I went on a TransAmerica with pretty much no experience as did our whole group of three. I am not sure If I would have worked up to a long tour eventually or not if I had started with short overnight trips. Most of the things that I love about touring are not there on a short trip.

I think maybe I would have lost interest quickly if I had taken short trips in the beginning.

The things I like most about touring based mostly on one TransAmerica tour are:
1. Being lost in the routine, not knowing what the day of the week or date are and not caring.
2. Seeing the country change as you pass through different areas.
3. Meeting folks from different areas and seeing how they are the same and how they are different from the folks back home. Marveling at the kindness and generosity of most of them.
4. Not knowing when I will finish the trip or even where I will stay tomorrow.
5. Meeting fellow long distance tourists along the way and sharing stories and information.
6. Being with your group 24/7. I guess depending on the group this could have been one of the things that I like least, so choose you companions wisely. I was lucky enough to be some great companions.

I don't think you get much of a feeling for the items on this list with overnight or other short trips. It is kind of like sleeping in the backyard to see if you like long distance backpacking or driving around the block to see if you might like a cross country car tour.

If you go without the experience gained on shorter trips you will make mistakes, but you can adjust. Carrying too much; send some stuff home. Some of your gear not suitable; have something else shipped to you or learn to cope with what you have. The key is to be adaptable, not necesarily to get it right up front.

Also you really can train as you go. It is best to have some miles under your belt, but one of the ladies on our 4200+ mile trip had been riding for maybe two months and had never gone more than 30 miles in a day the other had ridden more, but had never gone more than 42 miles. In the two months leading up to the trip they were dealing with final exams, getting ready to graduate from college, worrying about their plans after graduation and so on. this left minimal time to ride. Both of them did great! We started out with low mileage days and worked our mileage up as they improved. They were seasoned tourists by the end. Granted it helps that both were motivated and hard working by nature and that both were already experienced campers who love the outdoors..

I realize that just because it worked for us doesn't mean it is the right approach for you, but it is something to consider.

Check out our journal if you are interested in the trip.
http://www.crazyguyonabike.com/doc/staehling2007

-Pete
staehpj1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-07, 09:41 PM   #7
Jacobino
Two Tired Traveler
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Bikes: Miyata 15-speed
Posts: 83
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
If you can afford it, get a wider, more comfortable saddle. Then just do it. A lot of things you've been reading in the books will become second nature when you're on the road. My first tour was on a road bike, 1200 miles through California, Oregon, and Idaho. I got into shape and learned what I needed to know really quickly, and so will you.
Jacobino is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-21-07, 08:41 AM   #8
MotoMan
Old Crank
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Vermont
Bikes: Bianchi Eros; Motobecane Grand Touring; Nashbar Fra-may;Motobecane Grand Jubilee;Bianchi Advantage; Puegout UO-8;Specialized Mtn Bike.
Posts: 101
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
B17 with saddlebag/fenders.
MotoMan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-21-07, 10:19 AM   #9
Curiouswill
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Curiouswill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Great Falls, MT
Bikes: 2002? Cannondale Warrior 400r
Posts: 207
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Sound like I could just go out and tour right now

I found a eastwardly road (meaning, more flat than hill) with a number of small town dotted along the highway 24. It goes into Kansas so if I do indeed like this road for short touring then it have a potential there for a longer trip into the other state.

Seems like the most difficult part for me right now would be to find the money to buy the spare parts (like spare tubes) to bring along and to find out where along the road have good free-cheap campsites.

I do have a pannier but I would have to create a custom one for the other side to hold my tent and other supplies. I'll have to look around into the DIY threads around here for that.

Wish me luck

P.S. Staehpj1, I'm liking your crazyguyonabike journal I'm currently at page 33 of it. Thank for your link, Like I've mentioned, I've been getting hooked on some of the touring story and had been trying to remember where was that site that everybody post their touring journal. So you have provided my inspirations, advices, and entertainment in one fell swoop!
Curiouswill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-21-07, 10:50 AM   #10
staehpj1 
Senior Member
 
staehpj1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Bikes:
Posts: 9,094
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 109 Post(s)
I hope this all works out well for you. My best advice is "just do it!"

BTW: Eastern Colorado and Kansas were pretty friendly when it came to campsites both when were were on the TransAmerica Trail and when we were not. If we started asking we usually were allowed to stay in a city park or pointed to somewhere else. We didn't pay for a single night in Kansas, if I remember correctly.
staehpj1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-21-07, 10:54 AM   #11
staehpj1 
Senior Member
 
staehpj1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Bikes:
Posts: 9,094
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 109 Post(s)
I forgot to mention...
Please keep us posted on your travels. Now that my vacaton is all used up I have to scratch my touring "itch" vicariously for a while.
staehpj1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:29 PM.


We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.
 
  • Ask a Question
    get answers from real people!
Click to start entering your question.
I HAVE A QUESTION