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Ideal Touring Build Website

Old 03-10-08, 11:59 AM
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Ideal Touring Build Website

I remember in the fall there was a post that linked to a website that had a lot of suggestions for building up a touring bike. As I recall, the website was in a blog-type format, and the author was pretty knowledgeable about touring, and he explained what his first choices would be for each component if he was spec-ing out a build.

I know this is random, and kind of confusing...but does anyone have the link to that site? Or even have an idea what I'm taking about?

Thanks,
Andrew
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Old 03-10-08, 12:07 PM
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sorry, i just found it (tulio's blog), can a mod remove this? thanks
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Old 03-10-08, 12:41 PM
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Grantman18, why remove the thread? The idea behind forums is to exchange information. I am glad you found it. But we would want to leave it here so others can see and benefit. Actually, a link to the site would have been nice since you found it.
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Old 03-10-08, 02:28 PM
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good point

https://tullios.blogspot.com/2006/05/...component.html
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Old 03-10-08, 03:51 PM
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Originally Posted by grantman18
Mostly good suggestion but there's always room for improvement.

Wheels: XTs are excellent an excellent choice for a hub if you can't afford Phils. LX would be just about as good at much less cost. I couldn't suggest one rim over another, however. I have a set of Ritchey OC rims but they don't make them in 36 spokes anymore...pity. It was a really good idea for reducing dish.

For spokes, there's only one real choice. DT Alpines. Thicker, stronger elbow for a beefier wheel without too much of a weight penalty.

Headset: Threadless if you can. Simpler to adjust and maintain. Very field serviceable, unlike threaded headsets.

Stem: Again, threadless. Just about any threadless stem is stiffer and resists bending better than a quill.

Tires: I tried the Panaracers and hated them. They seemed tall and squirmy. Continental Contacts are pretty good.

Crank: The Sugino is okay but, if you can afford it, a Shimano Trekking with external bearings is the way to go. Dead simple to install and maintain. If you want less expensive, Jenson sells a Deore with 48/36/26 in an Octalink bottom bracket for the same price as the Sugino. The Octalink can be used with integral crank extractors while the Sugino can't. The Shimano cranks will also take much smaller inner rings...down to a 22.

Seat post: The Salsa Shaft is good with the tilt decoupled from the fore-aft adjustment. But the RaceFace seatposts work a bit better.

Front derailer: Best triple for road use (it will work with any crank from a 52/42/30 105 to a RaceFace Turbine to a Shimano XT trekking) is the Shimano Tiagra. Very, very forgiving. Wide between the plates and the plates themselves are narrow. Less fiddling to get it to stop rubbing then an Ultegra. And it will work with STI.

Bags: Bags with lots of pockets have a couple of problems. Either the pockets don't get used and are useless or the pockets get used and encourage you to carry too much unnecessary junk. Ortlieb Rollers are just a big single pocket that are waterproof and attach to the bike without hassle. I use ziplocks to organize my stuff in the bag but I'd do that anyway

And I wouldn't carry a seat bag. That's prime real estate back there. It's too handy to pile bulky lightweight stuff back there. For cameras and other stuff you need while you ride, it's hard to beat a handlebar bag. Put a camera in a seat bag and you'd beat it to pieces
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Old 03-10-08, 07:19 PM
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Building your own touring bike is a little like playing Black Jack in Vegas. It's a heck of a lot of fun, but you're not going to beat the House. Surly, Trek, Cannondale all spec really nice touring bikes-- it's impossible to beat them on price, or even quality.

Keep in mind I've built up several bikes and I love doing it.

Right now, lower end Shimano parts-- Deore, LX and Tiagra work really well. Stepping up to Ultegra or XT is often not worth the cost.

On a last note-- keep in mind the guy writting the blog is a bike shop owner selling parts. It's not bad advice, but he's got an axe to grind. Most shops push upgrades.....
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Old 03-10-08, 08:58 PM
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Huh? You think an off the rack bike is better than one I build for myself with the components I want? The Trek's gearing is too high for me and the rear rack is a little wanting. The Surly doesn't quite fit me very well, I would have to make some changes. I don't know anything about the Cannondale. The Raleigh is wanting in components.

I am glad those bikes work well for you, just not for me.
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Old 03-11-08, 05:32 AM
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I'm not supporting stock touring bikes 100%-- of course many riders would want to tweek there bike by swapping out parts. But most custom builds I've seen....end up having the same basic parts as the stock builds anyhow. It's easier and cheaper to switch out a few parts on LHT or Trek 520 than start from the frame up. Maybe not as fun however......
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Old 03-11-08, 09:19 AM
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Originally Posted by tacomee
it's impossible to beat them on price, or even quality.
Sure sounded like you are supporting stock touring bikes 100%, since it is impossible to beat them in quality. And why would the custom bikes have the same basic components? They would only have the same parts if you choose to put them on.

They may be easier and cheaper, but I wouldn't say the quality is better. I don't know about cheaper either. After I pay to have the crankset, wheels, tires and saddle changed, that $1250 Trek has become a lot more expensive.
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Old 03-11-08, 09:24 AM
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Originally Posted by tacomee
I'm not supporting stock touring bikes 100%-- of course many riders would want to tweek there bike by swapping out parts. But most custom builds I've seen....end up having the same basic parts as the stock builds anyhow. It's easier and cheaper to switch out a few parts on LHT or Trek 520 than start from the frame up. Maybe not as fun however......
I fully agree. Costwise, there is no way to beat a stock bike. Component-wise, stock bikes have some warts but even then replacing a few random parts is less expensive then paying retail for everything. The Cannondale T2 is just about the best spec'd touring bike on the market right now with the LHT complete a close second. The Trek 520 is a distant 3rd. And the Cannondale T1 is a total disaster

I've changed out every part on my T800 ('cause I wanted to) but I can see a single thing I'd change on the '08 T2...with the exception of the inner chain ring but that's just me.
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