Touring Have a dream to ride a bike across your state, across the country, or around the world? Self-contained or fully supported? Trade ideas, adventures, and more in our bicycle touring forum.

Food On Tour

Old 05-02-08, 04:05 PM
  #1  
maidenvoyage
Human
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 102
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Food On Tour

Hello All,

What food do you like to make while on tour?

Last edited by maidenvoyage; 05-02-08 at 04:06 PM. Reason: Bad senstence stuff
maidenvoyage is offline  
Old 05-02-08, 04:29 PM
  #2  
morbot
Senior Member
 
morbot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 789
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
i was just wondering the same. also recommendations for cooking equipment would be appreciated
morbot is offline  
Old 05-02-08, 06:33 PM
  #3  
raybo
Bike touring webrarian
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: San Francisco, CA
Posts: 1,896

Bikes: I tour on a Waterford Adventurecycle. It is a fabulous touring bike.

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 52 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 8 Times in 4 Posts
This page has 16 links to information about food and cooking on a bike tour. Several of the links will be of interest to you as they deal directly with your question.

Ray
raybo is offline  
Old 05-02-08, 07:22 PM
  #4  
wheel
Senior Member
 
wheel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Crystal MN
Posts: 2,147
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I use one tuperware dish, plastic bottles and a gov. can opener. Everything else can be used or reused along the way.


No camp fires and no stoves.
Stop at the food store around every 4 days (food sources are spread really far apart) with a resturant visit also.
after 4 loafs of bread it gets to be a bit much to carry.
I eat dried everything whey, fruit, milk, instant breakfest, jerky

Plan your food sources in advance (due to remote locations this is a must for me), then at a city park unload a meal into you. Maybe cook a second meal. Look for microwaves and BBQs. Repackage all additional items. Example Canned foods into bags.

Last edited by wheel; 05-02-08 at 07:29 PM.
wheel is offline  
Old 05-02-08, 09:57 PM
  #5  
BigBlueToe
Senior Member
 
BigBlueToe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Central Coast, CA
Posts: 3,392

Bikes: Surly LHT, Specialized Rockhopper, Nashbar Touring (old), Specialized Stumpjumper (older), Nishiki Tourer (model unknown)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Most of my tours are on roads where there are services occasionally. When I have to go two or three days between stores or restaurants, things change a lot.

On a typical day I have two breakfasts:
  • First breakfast is fresh brewed coffee I make with a single cup drip funnel, dripped into a plastic (lightweight) thermal mug. Along with that I either have a bagel with cream cheese or oatmeal.
  • Second breakfast is after I've ridden for awhile - usually to the first restaurant. I get something hearty - an omelette with meat and cheese or ham and eggs.

For lunch I try to find a sandwich shop or deli in a supermarket and get a sandwich. Alternative would be another restaurant.

For dinner I stop at the last store before the campground and buy food to cook for dinner. Typical stuff: a can of chili, a can of tuna, 2 or 3 cooked chicken breasts, a bag of salad, ramen, etc. I make soups, stews, barbecue steaks (on the grills in campsites), or just eat chicken breasts out of the bag or tuna out of the can.

I have a stove that runs off unleaded gasoline, an MSR set of two pots with a common lid that doubles as a bowl, a plastic plate, and some lexan cutlery. I use my Swiss Army Knife for opening cans as well as for slicing food.

For cold drinks I drink either water or mix powdered drinks in a water bottle. I devote one bottle to this. During the day when I drink water from it I can taste the mix's aftertaste. Usually I'll mix up some flavored drink when I ride as well - it's preferable to water with an aftertaste! I'm diabetic so I use Crystal Light - no sugar.

I've marked 1/4 cup, 1/2 cup, 1 cup, and 2 cup lines on a clear water bottle. That's my measuring cup.

For hot drinks it's always coffee. I can't have hot chocolate (the sugar) and don't like tea that much. I buy as good coffee as I can and always have plenty on hand. Nothing revitalizes me or cheers me up or warms me up as much as a good cup of hot coffee. I may have two or three in an evening and a couple cups in the morning before I leave camp.
BigBlueToe is offline  
Old 05-02-08, 11:05 PM
  #6  
sneekyjesus
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 294
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
how do you fall asleep after all that coffee? Can you explain brewing a little more, I'm interested in trying it in my upcoming tour.
sneekyjesus is offline  
Old 05-02-08, 11:18 PM
  #7  
Rowan
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 16,754
Mentioned: 120 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1427 Post(s)
Liked 21 Times in 14 Posts
The most relevant questions back at the OPs are: What do you eat at home? How tolerant is your stomach to changes in food styles (eating cold all the time instead of hot cooked)? Can you cook at home (coz if you can't, then there's no point in entertaining any cooking on tour)? Do you have food allergies or particular food needs? Do you know anything about food groups and how they translate into energy to ride? How much room are you likely to have for carrying food when you've packed everything else for a tour? If you have a preference for meat and other perishable foods, how would you handle them on the bike, especially in hot weather?

When you have answered those questions, a lot of the issues will fall into place, and you can then plan around those. Essentially, though, you need to think about carbohydrates for riding, adequate vitamin and mineral intake, and mixing up the other food groups -- generally a normal balanced diet with a little more emphasis on energy and maybe salt intake (potassium and sodium "lite" salt is a good thing).

If you want to cook, I suggest practising with your stove and utensils at home first.

And if you are on a tour over a goodly distance, fast food can be a really great treat to mix in with it all.
Rowan is offline  
Old 05-03-08, 02:01 AM
  #8  
thePig
Senior Member
 
thePig's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: London but shortly Sydney
Posts: 103

Bikes: Bianchi Road Bike & Gary Fisher Mountain Bike

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
My staple foods end up being thousands of bananas and cheese & ham sandwiches. They get a bit boring after a while but do the job quite well.

Last edited by thePig; 05-03-08 at 02:01 AM. Reason: spelling mistake
thePig is offline  
Old 05-03-08, 06:11 AM
  #9  
lighthorse
Senior Member
 
lighthorse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 498

Bikes: LeMond Buenos Aires, Trek 7500, Scattante CFR, Burley Hudson

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I always have a bag of bagels, container of peanut butter, several power bars, and a couple of bananas in my panniers. The rest I find in restaurants/stores along the way each day.
lighthorse is offline  
Old 05-03-08, 06:49 AM
  #10  
staehpj1 
Senior Member
 
staehpj1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Posts: 9,250
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 156 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
I carry one pot with a lid that doubles as a frying pan and a small stove. I carry a lexan plate and bowl and lexan utensils.

I shop for food daily in most cases, but always carry an extra day of food just in case. If I know that I will not be near a store I carry more.

I tend to snack all day on Fig Newtons, Jerky, fresh fruit, and whatever else strikes my fancy Including candy bars, ice cream, and other junk.

I often eat oatmeal or a granola bar for first breakfast in camp. Often after 10-20 mile a stop for second breakfast is nice. This might be eggs, pancakes, or biscuits and gravy in a diner. Alternately I might just snack as I go.

For lunch I eat a variety of no cook things, bagel PBJs, hummus sandwiches made with reconstituted dried hummus, or foil packed tuna or salmon made into wraps or sandwiches or eaten with crackers. Hard cheeses, fresh lettuce or more often cabbage, carrots, or avocados supplement most lunches. Once in a while I buy a sandwich at second breakfast to take along for lunch. Also once in a while I stop at a restaurant for lunch, but not too often.

Dinner is always a hot meal of some sort. It could be anything that I would eat at home, but is often something like red beans and rice. When available, fresh produce is always a big plus. Boiled cabbage and potatoes, or corn on the cob are great as are broccoli, cauliflower, fresh green beans, or whatever else looks good. Some pre-made chili we found out west that came in foil lined boxes was very good. I forget the brand. Pasta dishes were quick and easy and well as good, especially if supplemented with fresh bread and good cheese.

Freeze dried meals are expensive and not very good IMO. Freeze dried veggies were nice to have along for times when we couldn't get fresh. Peas and carrots were especially good. Dried onions added flavor to just about anything. Freeze dried green beans were OK.

Unlike some folks I tend to not eat huge meals when touring, but rather eat constantly all day.
staehpj1 is offline  
Old 05-03-08, 08:18 AM
  #11  
n4zou
Scott
 
n4zou's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 2,393

Bikes: Too Many

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by morbot View Post
i was just wondering the same. also recommendations for cooking equipment would be appreciated
I use an Army surplus Korean era stove and a small boy scout cook kit.

Unpacked


Packed

I'll purchase canned items and boxed stuff that don't need refrigeration. I love Peanut Butter and Jelly sandwiches! Every time I eat at a fast food joint I get as many packs of Jelly as I think I can get away with. Each pack is good for one sandwich so I need never worry about keeping the Jelly refrigerated.
n4zou is offline  
Old 05-03-08, 08:24 AM
  #12  
stevage
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 1,488

Bikes: Specialized Tricross Sport 2009

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Interesting thread: my touring food has mostly been at two extremes: restaurant/takeaway food, or store bought dehydrated camping food. Though I have to confess it's not a very logical choice: I tend to pass through so many towns, there are plenty of options for buying more nourishing and appetising food, and no reason to buy 3 days' worth in advance.

Though I recall one trip where pretty much the entire time I ate a neverending cheese and tomato sandwich. Run out of baguette? Buy another. Run out of cheese? Buy more. Run out of tomatoes? I *love* cheese (camembert) and tomato baguettes...

Steve
stevage is offline  
Old 05-03-08, 09:13 AM
  #13  
Erick L
Lentement mais sûrement
 
Erick L's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Montréal
Posts: 2,241
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 72 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Couscous and olive oil are a staples for me. Easy to make, equal parts or water and couscous, no draining required, just add boiling water and let it sit. Add veggies and meat as you like. I buy fresh or canned veggies during the day. Use the water in the can for cooking.

Oatmeal and raisins, fruits bought the day before in the morning, bagels and peanut butter in the morning/lunch. If carrying squishy bread, squish it before packing so at least it'll stay in shape. Soups anytime, morning lunch if cold and rainy, dinner.

I try to keep the restaurant for breakfast. It's usually cheaper and a good way to chat with locals and read the local paper.

For gear, I use the 1 liter pot of a GSI hard anodized cookset. They have a newer "ultralight" set that looks interesting. I use a MSR Dragonfly but plan on making an alcool stove for future trips.
Erick L is offline  
Old 05-03-08, 10:03 AM
  #14  
BigBlueToe
Senior Member
 
BigBlueToe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Central Coast, CA
Posts: 3,392

Bikes: Surly LHT, Specialized Rockhopper, Nashbar Touring (old), Specialized Stumpjumper (older), Nishiki Tourer (model unknown)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by sneekyjesus View Post
how do you fall asleep after all that coffee? Can you explain brewing a little more, I'm interested in trying it in my upcoming tour.
Falling asleep never seems to be an issue. I don't know why.

Melitta (and others) sells a small drip funnel that fits over a coffee cup, and small filters (size 2 I think) to fit. I put the link to Melitta here, but you can buy them at most supermarkets.

I buy coffee wherever - usually grocery stores. I fill about half a bag with beans and grind them to drip filter size. I have a plastic measurer. I boil some water, put the funnel over my mug, put in a filter, spoon in some coffee with my measurer, pour some water in, pour some more, and voila.

My funnel fits inside my MSR pots, along with a sponge, some camp suds, and a baggie with the number 2 filters.

BigBlueToe is offline  
Old 05-03-08, 04:52 PM
  #15  
Niles H.
eternalvoyage
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 2,256
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by maidenvoyage View Post
Hello All,

What food do you like to make while on tour?
It depends a lot on what sources are available. For a wilderness tour (stores few and far between), it is sometimes important to carry food that will give maximum calories and nutrition per pound. Often wild food are also available.

For more typical touring situations (various sorts of stores often available), here are some foods I've found to be good:

----Infused olive oil (extra virgin, cold pressed olive oil tends to have the best flavor). If you add a few cloves of garlic to a plastic container (like a small screw-top juice bottle), and your favorite herbs (dill weed is great with the garlic and olive oil), it is wonderful. It adds a nice touch to many dishes. You can refill at natural food stores. They often sell olive oil in bulk -- you just weigh your container and subtract that weight at checkout.

----Cottage cheese. If you Google 'cottage cheese recipes', you'll get a sense of how versatile it is. Some brands are much better than others. I like the nonfat, small curd, living culture (non-pasteurized) versions. Cabot (Vermont) is a good company.

It's very high in protein -- much higher than yogurt or milk, for example.

If you season it properly, it can be excellent. It goes well with many sorts of foods. Few people seem to appreciate the range of its versatility.

----Avocados. An easy way to prepare them: use a knife to ring the avocado (perpendicular to the long axis). Remove seed (very easy with knife -- just tap it so the blade sticks in the seed, then twist, then fling). You now have two little bowls ready to utilize. Fill them will a favorite sauce, condiment or seasoning. Enjoy.

They are one of the most energy-rich items in the produce department.

----All kinds of other fresh produce.

*******
Microwave ovens are very quick and useful. I carry at least one large microwavable container. When I have access to a microwave, I cook up a large serving some favorite dish. It can last for several meals.

There is a lot more than could be said on this topic.

Last edited by Niles H.; 05-07-08 at 01:23 PM.
Niles H. is offline  
Old 05-05-08, 07:51 AM
  #16  
paul2
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Toronto
Posts: 464
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Pasta.
paul2 is offline  
Old 05-05-08, 08:15 AM
  #17  
jcbryan
Senior Member
 
jcbryan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Beautiful SW Oklahoma
Posts: 155

Bikes: Trek 520, C-Dale Superbe Pro, Fuji Roubaix

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
food

Like Paul2 said, Pasta's are high in carbs needed to replentish your energy stores daily. Another great carb food is rice. Heat the water, throw the rice in, and finish unpacking. It'll be ready when you get done. (Put in your sleeping bag at the feet end!)Add some meat, think canned tuna or chicken, for protein repair of your muscles.
Rice is cheap and easy. Add a can of beans and some salsa for a more traditional Louisiana style dish.

Best, John
jcbryan is offline  
Old 05-06-08, 06:31 AM
  #18  
jibi
Left OZ now in Malaysia
 
jibi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Lancashire England, but at the moment on an extended tour of South East Asia
Posts: 826

Bikes: Thorn Ravan Catlayst, Bill Nickson tourer, Bill Nickson Time Trial, Claud Butler Cape Wrath, Motobecame Tandem etc etc

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
In wildnerness areas, pasta, couscous, and rice are staples, with cup-a-soups for flavour ( single portions).
Tuna for protein, biscuits, sweets.

Coffee, and honey for lots of brews, the honey can b used in sandwiches too.

I use the MSR Dragonfly which takes unleaded petrol.

Here in South East Asia there are so many food stalls along the road I have needed to buy any food to cook at all.


george
jibi is offline  
Old 05-06-08, 08:20 AM
  #19  
dudezor
abides and rides
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 471
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Niles H. View Post
For a wilderness tour (stores few and far between), it is sometimes important to carry food that will give maximum calories and nutrition per pound. Often wild food are also available.
That's interesting. Are you referring to meat here? Is the weight and (in)convenience of a hunting weapon (or tools) much of a consideration? Rudimentary fishing gear could be quite easy to pack in, I'm sure. I'm in Australia and probably wouldn't even be considering carrying a firearm, but I have been keen on the idea of solo bike touring for a while and think I might have to do it soon.

Last edited by dudezor; 05-06-08 at 08:25 AM.
dudezor is offline  
Old 05-06-08, 09:00 PM
  #20  
bikewidget
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Bellevue, WA
Posts: 14

Bikes: Lemond Tourmalet

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
We took a single burner stove that fit inside a small aluminum pot. Instant oatmeal for breakfast just about every morning. Dinner was tuna noodle casserole (can of tuna, can of soup, other vegs thrown in, pasta) or spaghetti (ground beef, ragu, green peppers and onions). Pizza Hut salad bars, or local diners serving a buffet for lunches. Then between breakfast, lunch and dinner we ate whatever was at hand.
bikewidget is offline  
Old 05-06-08, 10:55 PM
  #21  
Newspaperguy
Senior Member
 
Newspaperguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: British Columbia, Canada
Posts: 2,206
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
How I eat on the road says something about how I travel. I prefer getting on the road quickly and riding during the day. Then, when I reach my destination for the day, I'll stop and completely unwind.

Breakfast is usually some fresh fruit and some trail mix. If I'm quite hungry or if I'm not in any hurry, I might make some oatmeal instead. If I'm in or near a town, I'll try to stop at a grocery store and pick up a small container of cottage cheese and a muffin.

For lunch, if I'm at a grocery store or country store, I'll pick up a bun and a bit of meat for a sandwich, a salad and some fruit. If not, I'll make sure to have some food that will provide energy but won't take any cooking.

For supper, I'll often cook up rice, pasta or red or brown lentils, add some vegetables and cheese or lean ham and some spices. Most of my meals can be prepared in a single pot. I'll then wash it carefully and use it to boil the water for tea later in the evening.

While I'm riding, I make sure to carry fruit, trail mix and fruit leathers for snacks. I'm also quite fanatical about carrying lots of water as well as water purification tablets.
Newspaperguy is offline  
Old 05-07-08, 01:45 PM
  #22  
Niles H.
eternalvoyage
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 2,256
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by dudezor View Post
That's interesting. Are you referring to meat here? Is the weight and (in)convenience of a hunting weapon (or tools) much of a consideration? Rudimentary fishing gear could be quite easy to pack in, I'm sure. I'm in Australia and probably wouldn't even be considering carrying a firearm, but I have been keen on the idea of solo bike touring for a while and think I might have to do it soon.
No meat here. I'm not in favor of killing fellow beings who share this planet. It's theirs as well as ours -- they have awareness as we have it; and life and awareness and freedom are theirs as well as ours. They have their own consciousness and ways of relating to the universe, and they deserve respect. Albert Schweitzer's Reverence for Life includes them ["He received the 1952 Nobel Peace Prize in 1953 for his philosophy of 'reverence for life' [1]" ].

There are many leafy green vegetables, berries, seeds, nuts, fruits, mushrooms, wild grains, cacti, pods, etc. Someone posted on another thread (it might have been a wild foods thread), from Australia, about a course she took, in which she learned about many of the plants used by Native Peoples in Australia. There is a lot to learn in this field, and it can be fascinating.

****
[It is true that plants are living creatures; but, as Stephen Gaskin once put it, "I've been to rice boilings, and I've been to pig stickings. And the vibes at the rice boilings were a whole lot better."]

Last edited by Niles H.; 05-08-08 at 03:50 PM.
Niles H. is offline  
Old 05-07-08, 03:20 PM
  #23  
Roughstuff
Punk Rock Lives
 
Roughstuff's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: In a cabin in the adirondacks
Posts: 3,165

Bikes: Fuji touring

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 48 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by maidenvoyage View Post
Hello All,

What food do you like to make while on tour?
Breakfast: often yogurt/kefir; or biscuits/rolls and cheese. Sometimes eggs or cold cereal. Coffee at a small diner once i hit the road.

Lunch: peanut butter sandwiches, chips/snacks, alot of water.

Dinner: this is the only meal I really 'cook.' I love to make a 'stew' with a sausage, onions, potato, and tomato. Mac and Cheese sometimes. Ramen noodles sometimes.

roughstuff
Roughstuff is offline  
Old 05-07-08, 03:23 PM
  #24  
Roughstuff
Punk Rock Lives
 
Roughstuff's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: In a cabin in the adirondacks
Posts: 3,165

Bikes: Fuji touring

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 48 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Niles H. View Post
No meat here. I'm not in favor of killing fellow beings who share this planet. It's theirs as well as ours -- they have awareness as we have it; and life and awareness and freedom are theirs as well as ours. They have their own consciousness and ways of relating to the universe, and they deserve respect. Albert Schweitzer's Reverence for Life includes them ["He received the 1952 Nobel Peace Prize in 1953 for his philosophy of 'reverence for life'" [1] ].

There are many vegetables, roots, seeds, nuts, bulbs, mushrooms, wild grains, cacti, pods, etc. Someone posted on another thread (it might have been a wild foods thread), from Australia, about a course she took, in which she learned about many of the plants used by Native Peoples in Australia. There is a lot to learn in this field, and it can be fascinating.

****
[It is true that plants are living creatures; but, as Stephen Gaskin once put it, "I've been to rice boilings, and I've been to pig stickings. And the vibes at the rice boilings were a whole lot better."]
Have ya ever read "The Secret Life of Plants" by Thomkins and Bird? Pickin on a poor defenseless veggie! Shame on you!


roughstuff
Roughstuff is offline  
Old 05-07-08, 03:34 PM
  #25  
SandLizrd
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 181
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I've always found that the adversity is the part I remember best about my voyages, so I make sure that meal times are very adverse! Here's some advice for memorable moments.

- be sure your stove is an extra-tall model. More likely you'll remember having to pick it up off the ground when it topples. The burns might stick around for awhile too, just so you don't forget. Stove must be of inferior model, because it's more adventerous when it doesn't light, or spits fuel all over, or does other fun things. Loose, leaky propane fittings are also popular.

- get a cook kit that requires extra pliers-type devices, or reassembly of handles, or other complications before you cook. The pliers-type kits are especially fun - when you drop your food a few times you really have fun telling the stories! Dentists are especially good listeners - chomping those rocks and gravel give you an excuse to go visit.

- use paper plates. They like to fold up on you and dump your food on the ground. Have you heard that dirt is nutritious? Neither did I, I'm just hoping you did.

- get as complicated as possible! You'll need enough ingredients to fill a chef's larder. You'll need to cut and prepare for hours, preferably on a dirty picnic table. Mixing in dill seeds and cloves is bound to increase the adventure. You might be so hungry you'll just wolf it down when it's ready, and it's likely to taste like dirt anyway (see points one, two and three) but think of the stories.

- be sure it's very aromatic. Get that aroma on the table, on your clothes, on the tent, everywhere. It's nice to enjoy nature, and having bears around camp is the best way. Small creatures that eat holes in your panniers to get at that nice aroma are fun too!

- Store food in your tent, so you can get even closer to nature. You see, when cooking is done correctly, wolves can sit in the distance and listen to the howls coming from camp. That's when they know it's time to move in! Luckily you've kept all the food close by so they don't get it and you can enjoy their company.

This is only the beginning of the adversity one can obtain while cooking on tour, but if you're determined and you practice, you can get even better than this! "Rotten food made me puke all night" is a common refrain, along with "everything tasted like chamois butter / chainlube / bear repellant". But this only scratches the surface. Good luck and have fun!
SandLizrd is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.