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yet anoher packing list

Old 07-02-08, 02:56 PM
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yet anoher packing list

so next week i am going to start a 3 to 4 week tour down the coast of oregon and california and then inland. i will be camping whereever and cooking my own food half of the time.

the bike gear:
surly lht custom spec'd
tubus rear locc rack
pass stow front rack
ortleib front and rear panniers


the stuff:
backpacking 2p tent. 4.5 lbs
10 degree sleeping bag. 2 lbs
small sleeping pad. 1 lb
backpacking stove 1 lb
cookset 1 lb
solio solar charger 1 lb


clothes:
3 t-shirts
2 pairs of padded cycling shorts, 1 pair of normal shorts
1 pair of pants
3 pairs of underwear
3 pairs of socks
1 hoody
1 rain jacket and pants
1 pair of chacos
1 pair of shoes
1 hat
1 bandanna


tools n stuff:
topeak alien 2 multi tool
3 tire levers
2 extra tubes
patch kit
small crank bros. pump
spoke wrench
leatherman wave
kryptonite evo 2000 mini ulock, plus cable
thing of floss, plus needles





so, what do you all think?

Last edited by Jaron; 07-02-08 at 03:02 PM.
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Old 07-02-08, 03:36 PM
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***** that looks good to me why no cycle helmet ,hope you have a great tour look after yourself .
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Old 07-02-08, 03:45 PM
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A couple of comments...

You list both shorts and pants. I would suggest you buy a pair of pants that can be unzipped to make shorts. I have two pair and always take one on tour. They are also all synthetic so they dry quickly. Whatever you do, don't take levis as they are too heavy.

For shirts, I always take non-cotton ones that dry quickly.

How heavy is that "hoodie?" A lighter fabric will save you weight. Can the rain coat double as a warmth layer?

I don't know what chacos are but I assume they are shoes. If so, how much do they weigh?

I only take 2 tire levers.

Don't take such a heavy lock. You can't stop someone determined to steal your bike no matter what kind of lock you have. You are trying to stop someone who would take your bike if it wasn't locked. I use a master lock and cable.

Have a great time,

Ray
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Old 07-02-08, 03:49 PM
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Seems pretty good. A few things to consider adding:

- chain lube / cleaning supplies
- spare spokes or fiberfix temporary spoke
- spare chain links
- a book
- a radio
- maybe a base layer or two
- ultralight pack towel
- 1st aid kit
- LED headlamp (pure pwnage)

I'm not 100% clear on your footwear, by the way. Even if you stick to platform pedals, I recommend you go with stiff soles -- maybe cycling sandals instead of the Chacos. Real shoes may not be necessary; I do OK with cycling shoes and a pair of Tevas.

I also prefer a cable lock to U locks, more versatile. YMMV.
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Old 07-02-08, 04:57 PM
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4 weeks of hand washing clothes every day (2 pairs shorts) is a pain on the butt and hands, I recommend taking as many as 5 days worth of cycling clothes and using Laundromats once a week. The extra clothes don't really weigh that much. That extra weight for me is well worth not having to do hand laundry every day or every other day.
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Old 07-02-08, 05:04 PM
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I take three pairs of shorts and three jerseys (which can be used for off the bike clothing, as well). I usually wash every day but don't have to if it isn't convenient.

Ray
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Old 07-02-08, 05:45 PM
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Originally Posted by raybo

For shirts, I always take non-cotton ones that dry quickly.

Don't take such a heavy lock. You can't stop someone determined to steal your bike no matter what kind of lock you have. You are trying to stop someone who would take your bike if it wasn't locked. I use a master lock and cable.

i disagree with both. i don't want a shirt that will wick away sweat as i am going to be biking during the middle of summer, and i want cotton shirts to stay wet so i'll stay cool with the wind.

and a small master lock can be cut with a pocket bolt cutter in 5 seconds and someone could walk away with the bike with basically no one thinking twice about it it's so quick. i just want something to lock up for half an hour without having to worry about it.


Originally Posted by Bacciagalupe
Seems pretty good. A few things to consider adding:

- spare spokes or fiberfix temporary spoke
- ultralight pack towel
- 1st aid kit
- LED headlamp (pure pwnage)

I'm not 100% clear on your footwear, by the way. Even if you stick to platform pedals, I recommend you go with stiff soles -- maybe cycling sandals instead of the Chacos. Real shoes may not be necessary; I do OK with cycling shoes and a pair of Tevas.

i am not planning to bring anything if i break a spoke, so i'll just deal with it if the time comes. i have an ultra light towel that i am bringing, forgot to add to the list. same with the headlamp. i'll throw a 1st aid kit in there because i think i'll have plenty of extra room.

i have pedals with toe cages for when i wear the shoes (light hiking shoes, semi waterproof), but if it gets hot, i can take the cages off and wear the chacos. i don't want clipless for touring.


Originally Posted by gregw
4 weeks of hand washing clothes every day (2 pairs shorts) is a pain on the butt and hands, I recommend taking as many as 5 days worth of cycling clothes and using Laundromats once a week. The extra clothes don't really weigh that much. That extra weight for me is well worth not having to do hand laundry every day or every other day.

the only thing i will be washing every day is one pair of shorts. i tend to have less needs than most people for clean clothes, so i am fine with wearing say a pair of socks for 3-5 days, or a pair of pants for a couple months without washing them.
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Old 07-02-08, 06:39 PM
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Maybe ditch some of the 'street' clothes. A t-shirt or a button SS and a pair of shorts and something Teva like or Converse like should cover bases.

Maybe a long-sleeve thin base layer and a rain shell, which double up for cool evenings outside the tent.

Sunscreen. Actually, I like to use a LS bike jersey to cut down on use of that.

Helmet.

Gloves. If you take a tumble, the chances are you'll try to protect/lessen impact with hands. Pavement and gravel are pretty abrasive and it's hard to ride a loaded touring bike uphill one handed.
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Old 07-02-08, 08:11 PM
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what's the solio for?
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Old 07-02-08, 09:07 PM
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Originally Posted by valygrl
what's the solio for?

it's a solar charger. im going to hook it up on the top of my gear to charge during the day while i am riding. then at night i can use it to charge my cell phone and ipod and the like.
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Old 07-02-08, 09:17 PM
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gotcha - i didn't see cell phone & ipod on the packing list.

have you used the solio? i'm curious about those things - my friend had a brunton panel on a tour, and it was next to useless.
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Old 07-02-08, 09:22 PM
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Originally Posted by valygrl
gotcha - i didn't see cell phone & ipod on the packing list.

have you used the solio? i'm curious about those things - my friend had a brunton panel on a tour, and it was next to useless.

i haven't used it yet. i got it for very cheap so it's mostly an experiment on this trip.

things on the list that i forgot to add or felt were obvious enough not to be listed:

cell phone
ipod
front and rear lights
gloves
camera + some film
a book
a journal
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Old 07-03-08, 05:30 AM
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Originally Posted by *****
i haven't used it yet. i got it for very cheap so it's mostly an experiment on this trip.

things on the list that i forgot to add or felt were obvious enough not to be listed:

cell phone
ipod
front and rear lights
gloves
camera + some film
a book
a journal
Also said: "I am not planning to bring anything if i break a spoke, so i'll just deal with it if the time comes."

If your willing to carry all these items, than a replacement spoke or two would be no problem. You will also need a tool to remove your rear cassette, one of theses works fine.

https://www.sheldonbrown.com/harris/s...ock/index.html

No replacement spokes = Poor planning
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Old 07-03-08, 09:23 AM
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Fiberfix spoke, no extra tools required, weighs about the same as a pack of gum.

https://www.cambriabike.com/shopexd.asp?id=19239
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Old 07-03-08, 10:29 AM
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Originally Posted by *****
i disagree with both. i don't want a shirt that will wick away sweat as i am going to be biking during the middle of summer, and i want cotton shirts to stay wet so i'll stay cool with the wind.
You will actually be much cooler with a jersey that wicks than a cotton shirt. If it is hot enough for you to be sweating that much both materials will saturate and then it becomes about how rapidly the water evaporates off of the material. Wicking shirts were designed to allow water to evaporate much faster than the cotton and the faster the water evaporates the cooler you are. Cotton will just get heavy and wet and sticky, wicking materials, be they wool or otherwise will stay much cooler and drier.

Some of the really high tech base layers available these days are really amazing in their ability to aid in water movement in evaporation. Watch a summer bike race, with rare exceptions even on really hot days you will see the pro's wearing a good base layer under their jersey because in aids in keeping the body cool by speeding evaporation.
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Old 07-03-08, 11:13 AM
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Originally Posted by gregw
Also said: "I am not planning to bring anything if i break a spoke, so i'll just deal with it if the time comes."

If your willing to carry all these items, than a replacement spoke or two would be no problem. You will also need a tool to remove your rear cassette, one of theses works fine.

https://www.sheldonbrown.com/harris/s...ock/index.html

No replacement spokes = Poor planning

you know, i'll be biking down 101. there will be a city every half an hour probably, and im guessing a couple bike shops a day. worst case scenario, i can just hitch to the next big town. and it's not like i can just stroll to my lbs and they'll have a cassette cracker.

Last edited by Jaron; 07-03-08 at 11:18 AM.
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Old 07-03-08, 11:17 AM
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Originally Posted by Halthane
You will actually be much cooler with a jersey that wicks than a cotton shirt. If it is hot enough for you to be sweating that much both materials will saturate and then it becomes about how rapidly the water evaporates off of the material. Wicking shirts were designed to allow water to evaporate much faster than the cotton and the faster the water evaporates the cooler you are. Cotton will just get heavy and wet and sticky, wicking materials, be they wool or otherwise will stay much cooler and drier.

Some of the really high tech base layers available these days are really amazing in their ability to aid in water movement in evaporation. Watch a summer bike race, with rare exceptions even on really hot days you will see the pro's wearing a good base layer under their jersey because in aids in keeping the body cool by speeding evaporation.


i didn't think about it like that, but i guess i'll take your word for it.
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Old 07-03-08, 12:53 PM
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Originally Posted by *****
you know, i'll be biking down 101. there will be a city every half an hour probably, and im guessing a couple bike shops a day. worst case scenario, i can just hitch to the next big town. and it's not like i can just stroll to my lbs and they'll have a cassette cracker.

You put your list on a public forum, did you expect everyone to marvel at your clever packing?

Why try to hitch a ride with a fully loaded touring bike when you could just fix the darn thing yourself in about 15 minutes or patch it with a fiberspoke in 5 like Valygrl suggested. If you don't know how to do it, then learn, it's really easy.
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Old 07-03-08, 01:47 PM
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Originally Posted by gregw
You put your list on a public forum, did you expect everyone to marvel at your clever packing?

Why try to hitch a ride with a fully loaded touring bike when you could just fix the darn thing yourself in about 15 minutes or patch it with a fiberspoke in 5 like Valygrl suggested. If you don't know how to do it, then learn, it's really easy.


it has nothing to do with me not knowing how to do it. any other stupid assumptions?

i put it up on a public forum not because i thought i was being clever (jackass), but in case there were things i had forgotten. i had decided before i posted here that i was going to take minimal tools. when i am at the shop today i'll see if they have a fiberfix.
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Old 07-06-08, 06:39 PM
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I think mostly your list looks good. A couple things I learned from my one tour (a week): I like the modern shirts that aren't quite jerseys, but wick well: I was surprised how cool I was in an Alert Shirt (over 90 degrees) and my other is from Russell Athletic. The latter can be washed and is dry the next morning; the Alert Shirt, almost so.

And I will not bring dress shoes next time; dark mountain bike shoes are probably enough to get me into 3 out of 4 restaurants.

And I'd bring a small bottle of chain lube.

I back you on the U-lock; the mini isn't even that heavy.
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Old 07-06-08, 08:58 PM
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+1 Very basic first aid kit. A small one will not add any appreciable weight or take any appreciable space.

+1 LED headlamp, very small, very effective. If you don't mind Walmart, they sell one for about $6.

+1 Zip pants/shorts, great suggestion.

+1 Chain lube.


It would be great after your trip to get comments on what you wish you had taken, and what you did not need.

Last edited by wrk101; 07-06-08 at 09:00 PM. Reason: addl info
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