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18 speed Cannondale Touring Road Bike**********

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18 speed Cannondale Touring Road Bike**********

Old 07-20-08, 11:15 AM
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18 speed Cannondale Touring Road Bike**********

Hi,

I am looking at a used bike on Craigslist that does not have a model number listed so I'm trying to figure out if it really is a touring bike or is it just a road bike? The owner doesn't seem to know. It is her husband's bike. What makes me suspicious is the 18 speed part and that they call it a "touring road bike". Has anyone ever heard of a Cannondale touring bike being 18 speed or anyone converting it to 18 speed?

Here is the ad:

Cannondale Touring Road Bike-- Excellent Condition! Aluminum (large) frame, 18 speed, components function great, dual water bottle holders, touring rack, rides like new.

Any thoughts before I drive a long distance to look at it?

Many thanks!!!
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Old 07-20-08, 11:31 AM
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Pics in the advert aren't big enough for me to see if this bike has fender mounts or not. Can anyone else ID this bike for the OP?

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Old 07-20-08, 11:32 AM
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Have them give you the serial and then check here

https://www.vintagecannondale.com/info.html


From the picture it appears to be a touring frame, long chainstays.

I'm guessing mid 80's model


ST500 came as a an 18 speed with 1983,84 having a Suntour freewheel, changing to Shimano in '85


Doug

83 ST300 Touring 'dale

Last edited by dcullen; 07-20-08 at 11:46 AM.
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Old 07-20-08, 11:32 AM
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Need a pic of it First Thing.
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Old 07-20-08, 11:39 AM
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Thanks so much for your help everyone. The only thing about the serial number is that I can't find on that website where it will tell you what model the bike is...only what year it was made.

Is there any other way you can think of to ID it?

Thanks
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Old 07-20-08, 11:49 AM
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Originally Posted by nickm77
Thanks so much for your help everyone. The only thing about the serial number is that I can't find on that website where it will tell you what model the bike is...only what year it was made.

Is there any other way you can think of to ID it?

Thanks
Its definitely the touring frame, look at the space between the wheel and seat tube. They frame changed very little in the 80's and Early 90's. All have double eyelets front and back and actually 3 sets of water bottle bosses (one set on the bottom of the downtube)

Cheers

Doug
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Old 07-20-08, 12:38 PM
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So if it is the touring frame, is there anything else I should keep me head up for (i.e. things I would have to spend serious money to convert for touring)? For instance, is the 18 speed part a problem? If it is, how expensive is it to change that? Or do most people go ahead and change the gears on even stock touring bikes?

Thanks again!!
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Old 07-20-08, 12:44 PM
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I see a new phil wood rear freewheel in your future.
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Old 07-20-08, 12:56 PM
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Please pardon my ignorance (I'm new to this), but what is a Phil Wood rear freewheel? Just a brand of wheel (i.e.Mavic, etc)?

Also, I see what you are saying about the space between wheel and tube, dcullen.

Is the ST500 desireable for loaded touring, or should I wait til a T500 or Trek 520 comes along?

Also, is $300 too much?

Thanks
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Old 07-20-08, 02:55 PM
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From what I've heard the ST500 is a decent touring frame. I settled on a Surly for my tourer but might still consider something like a ST500 for commuting. IMHO $300 for one in good shape is a pretty good deal (though I might haggle a little) if it fits you right. On the other hand a good mid 1980s Trek 520, 620 or better yet 720 touring frame is a classic and might be better if you are serious about touring. I currently am waiting to get my hands on a good 1984 or 85 720.

Phil Wood is the premier US brand for hubs and bottom brackets and highly recommended for touring.

Here's an article about what a freewheel is vs a cassette.

Cheers and good luck!
tdp
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Old 07-20-08, 04:39 PM
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Not to quibble here but the Cannondale is fine as the TREK of the same vintage. I really like my 'dale since I'm a clyde and it was the first frame that didn't feel wimpy when I crank up hills.

Cannondale Pros:
  • Reasonably light and rigid (rides better loaded)
  • Frame has touring geometry and "braze-ons" (mounts for fender, racks, bottle pages) It is a real touring bike already
  • Came with decent components (18 speed was state of the art then) that are most likely still serviceable.

Cons:
  • Some folks feel that aluminum frames have a rough ride (not my experience with my 'dale)
  • The rear wheel is most likely a separate hub and freewheel system. Not as strong as a modern freehub. (Ride it till it dies and replace it with a modern 9 speed freehub. Phil Wood are cream of the crop, but lots of folks tour on Shimano XT or Deore freehubs)
  • Probably has 27" rims. You don't get as many tire choices but that has improved a lot lately - Schwalbes, Paselas and Conti's all come in 27" sizes
  • Overall gear is too high for loaded touring - this is a problem with almost all mass produced "touring" bikes. Replace the crankset or gear rings with a modern mountain bike set.
  • Brakes are going be OK sidepulls, but might be hairy for loaded touring in mountainous areas. Upgrade choices are a bit limited (Tektro R730 or R736 dual pivots) No easy way to use cantilevers or vbrakes. (I replace my front fork due to damage and gained cantilever bosses - big improvement.)
For $300 you'll get a good bike good for tooling around town and some light touring or even loaded touring on flatter trips. You'll end up investing $$ to bring it up the level of a new LHT. But you can upgrade in stages as you find what what you need. I waited out some good values on ebay to keep my cost down. In the end I spent more than a new LHT to upgrade my Cannondale, but it has sentimental value and I know every piece of it and how to repair it since I built in in the first place.

BUT most important factor is FIT.


Cheers
Doug
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Old 07-20-08, 08:05 PM
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Originally Posted by nickm77
Please pardon my ignorance (I'm new to this), but what is a Phil Wood rear freewheel? Just a brand of wheel (i.e.Mavic, etc)?

Also, I see what you are saying about the space between wheel and tube, dcullen.

Is the ST500 desireable for loaded touring, or should I wait til a T500 or Trek 520 comes along?

Also, is $300 too much?

Thanks
Yes. The Cannondale touring frames are about as good as it gets for production bikes. Well thought out, well designed touring frames. Don't look down on them just because they don't fit the steel-is-real crowd's narrow way of thinking

The gearing is probably not original and it has a 6 speed freewheel instead of the standard 5. Not something to worry about. You could likely switch it to index...STI or barend...relatively easily. You'd have to use road components since 135 mm mountain bike stuff probably won't work.
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Old 07-21-08, 10:00 AM
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Originally Posted by cb400bill
Pics in the advert aren't big enough for me to see if this bike has fender mounts or not. Can anyone else ID this bike for the OP?


It's hard to tell from the photo, but from what has been said it has side-pull brakes, double chainring, and looks like down-tube shifters. If your sure you like these things than it's good to go, but in my book, these would need to be changed. If the bike was free maybe, but I would look for a newer model, just my opinion.
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Old 07-21-08, 11:03 AM
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Read dcullen's post

An early 90' c-dale T series owner:

Cons

As a non-clyde I find the ride harsh unless load it up with some gear.
27in wheels are deal breakers for me. They -may- be 700

Meh

DT shifters, some folks like them some don't. My XL wingspan likes them
I'm swapping out the stock 48-38-28 when I turn 40.

Wheel talk:

When I replaced the 15 year old hub 8 year old rim the mainstream stores wanted to do all sorts of funky things but -all- the retro shacks said, "Get thyself a 135mm phil freewheel." You get the blingage of phil for the same price as a mid-range freehub with no changes to the drive train.

Last edited by escii_35; 07-21-08 at 12:04 PM.
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