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Homemade Chain Lube

Old 03-27-16, 06:55 PM
  #26  
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I use the thin motor oil. I mix a little WD-40 in it.
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Old 03-28-16, 08:40 AM
  #27  
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Thick oil. Period.

Better yet: --- Thick oil with an additive that increases its surface tension so it stays in place.

Chain-L or chainsaw bar oil.
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Old 03-28-16, 08:59 AM
  #28  
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Motorbike gear oil would do. The same thing as the overpriced chain-l lubricant. You'll be impressed by their marketing anyway. However you'll get a gallon of 75w140 gear oil at a friction of their price.

It is practical to apply gear oil on motorbike chain.

Last edited by chrischen98; 03-28-16 at 09:04 AM.
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Old 03-28-16, 09:29 AM
  #29  
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Two cycle engine oil and gasoline mixture works great. Provides a lube film and clean your chain at the same time. I have tried Dave Moulton's novel technique and it works very well.

Dave Moulton's Blog - Dave Moulton's Bike Blog - A different way to lube a*chain
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Old 03-28-16, 09:38 AM
  #30  
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As you are in India, go to any bicycle shop - seller or repairer and use what they use. Getting USA stuff (that posters suggest) may be tough to find in India. The Indians know what works for them - in terms of efficacy, and availability, and COST.

Yes, bicycles everywhere. One of the manufacturers holds the Guinness Book of World records for MAKING the most bicycles a day in the world. Apparently 18,500 bicycles/day!
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Old 11-19-17, 12:55 AM
  #31  
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chain saw lube/oil is suitable for cycling chains

I tried the chain saw oil - at first it looked like it could work well. I then noticed there was a lot of lube being flung off the chain - my garage floor has splatters from it - i would back pedal etc....even on my indoor trainer bike. I also noticed on a return 60km route that i could hear my chain - i've never heard it before - especially on my road bike without any grime or mud......so the chain was running quite dry. The chainsaw lube does not stay on the chain for long.

I believe the chainsaw lube was designed to be light and to be thrown off a typical chainsaw that would be filling up with saw dust....so the lube cannot be heavy.

Back to the drawing board....i might try good old engine oil or gear oil. I believe gear oil is even thicker.
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Old 11-19-17, 02:07 PM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by robert schlatte View Post
Two cycle engine oil and gasoline mixture works great. Provides a lube film and clean your chain at the same time. I have tried Dave Moulton's novel technique and it works very well.
Dave Moulton's Blog - Dave Moulton's Bike Blog - A different way to lube a*chain
A safer and less costly alternative is any motor oil diluted with mineral spirits. Two-cycle oil normally costs 10-40x as much as motor oil. There's no advantage to 2-cycle oil over the cheaper, more readily available 4-cycle automotive engine oil for the purpose of bicycle chain lubrication and rust prevention.

Originally Posted by Machoman121 View Post
I tried the chain saw oil...
Eight-year-old thread.

I'd never use chainsaw bar oil on my bike chain - it's viscous and sticky and more likely to retain dirt particles constantly flung from the front tire onto chain as it rounds the crank. Save the bar oil for your Husqvarna/Stihl saw, and get some good full-coverage fenders with front mud flap for your bike.

Read post #4, then try a mixture of any common motor oil (whatever you use in your motor vehicle) diluted with mineral spirits (found in paint section of hardware store or walmart) at approximately 1:5 ratio. Apply mixture sparingly, then you're less likely to have oil droplets on your chainstay and garage floor. Reapply at regular, frequent intervals for best results.

Does lubricant prevent chain rust?
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Old 11-21-17, 02:42 PM
  #33  
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There's been many tests of bicycle chain lube done and most tests find that the lube (or even no lube at all) makes very little difference in the mechanical resistance of pedaling.
Bicycle chains are not loaded much (by machine standards) and they only spin at very low speeds.
Even with a totally-non-lubed chain it sounds bad because you can hear the rollers rattling, but even so it is only a very tiny difference in efficiency.

The main reason that you lube bicycle chains is to keep them from rusting--particularly the pins.
The pins are hardened carbon steel and very susceptible to rust, and to stay in place they must fit very tight into the sideplates.
Enough exposure to water will make the pins rust and become loose, and then they are at risk of working out.

So any kind of oil is better than nothing. Even -used- motor oil is okay. You just may need to apply it more often in wet or dirty/dusty environments.
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Old 11-30-17, 08:16 PM
  #34  
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How about cooking oil?
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Old 11-30-17, 08:47 PM
  #35  
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This thread needs some oil. It's getting -pretty- squeaky.
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Old 11-30-17, 10:21 PM
  #36  
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Oy vey are we rehashing an old chain lube debate? Come on we need to evolve past all of this. Use whatever chain lubricant works best for you, keep it as clean as works best for you and go from there. If you think you might want to change something, strip your chain of old lube and put new lube on and test that for a while and then ask yourself "what did I like" and "what didn't I like" and compare that to your old chain lubing.
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Old 12-01-17, 04:52 PM
  #37  
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Originally Posted by Biknmik View Post
I've used airtool oil with out any problems. comes in a handy size with a push down spout.
Yeah, IME any lighter lubricant will work fine, even if it's not ideal. Might end up cleaning things more often since some things tend to collect more dirt/grime than others.
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Old 11-21-18, 11:12 PM
  #38  
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I'm using a mix that another user on this forum named 2_i reccomended for permanent lubrication and rust prevention when storing bikes outside in the rain: Boeshield T-9 mixed with LPS-3 mixed with ACF-50
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Old 11-23-18, 08:54 AM
  #39  
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You can use organic, biodegradable olive oil or sun flower oil. You may have to apply it more often, but you are not harming the planet.
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Old 11-23-18, 03:18 PM
  #40  
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On a tour in a rather remote section of Northern California, I found that dry spray-on sunblock worked really well to get rid of an annoying chain squeak.
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Old 11-23-18, 06:49 PM
  #41  
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I use Brooks Proofide. Apply think gunks of it randomly on the chain, then heat with a hair dryer (while back pedaling) until it melts and covers all the links. Smells great, and it's far less destructive to your saddle than applying the stuff to leather. Won't hurt the chain much either.
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Old 11-23-18, 07:20 PM
  #42  
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1 part paraffin wax.
1 part paraffin oil
1 part Xylene.

heat wax and oil until dissolved. Add Xylene. Treat VERY clean chain with it. Solvent dissolves and leaves waxy oil behind. Clean and dry and does not pick up dirt.
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Old 03-22-19, 05:06 AM
  #43  
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Results of my test:
5 cruddy bikes were stored outside in the rain and sun since November.
All of these bikes had every metal wearable surface sprayed down or
wiped down with the triple combination of Boeshield T-9, LPS-3, and
ACF-50. This solution was also injected under pressure into all
bowden cables for brakes and shifters. Pedal bearings, BB's, and hubs
also received this solution injected under pressure. One of these
bikes is such a piece of junk none of my friends wanted to ride it, so
it has sat all winter. All 4 other bikes were occasionally ridden,
including through small creeks and fields of mud with no washing them
off. The cruddy Huffy 3" tire bike (Huffy's attempt at a fat tire
bike) recieved the worst abuse. In February, it was carried on a car
bike rack through mountain passes that had snowstorms and freezing
temps all the way to the coast, it was then ridden through the surf on
the beach after a dog, and then it was not washed. More lube was
added. No freshwater wash occurred, except for alternating rain and
snow on the drive back. . Once back, it has been ridden mercilessly,
through mud, wet grass, and rain and snow. Not washed once. Beach
sand is still visibly clinging to parts of the bike, along with great
gobs of mud. No Rust on this bike.

No rust has developed on ANY bike, or chain. All shifters and brakes
work as well as they did when new (these are all Walmart bikes, so
very poorly). The bike that sat unused since November.needed the
tires re-inflated, and water dumped out of the frame, but rides like
new.
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Old 03-22-19, 06:26 AM
  #44  
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I hope the OP made back from India
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Old 03-22-19, 08:23 AM
  #45  
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Originally Posted by engine1776 View Post
Results of my test:
5 cruddy bikes were stored outside in the rain and sun since November.
All of these bikes had every metal wearable surface sprayed down or
wiped down with the triple combination of Boeshield T-9, LPS-3, and
ACF-50. .
Interesting, though I like Boeshield T-9 in the aerosol spray for its convenience and it seems to do a decent job of lubrication, it has never been great at rust prevention by itself for me. The magic must be in the elixir.
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Old 03-22-19, 09:32 AM
  #46  
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Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN View Post
Another vintage thread from the past.
And again.

***

When this thread started, I used petroleum based oil. Sometimes thin and sometimes thick. But it was always a dust magnet. Last couple years went to a wax based chain lube, but recently ran out. Now starting to try Finish Line Ceramic lube, too early to tell what I think of it.
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Old 03-22-19, 02:38 PM
  #47  
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I would definitely recommend the combo of Boeshield T-9, then spray LPS-3, then ACF 50, then finish up with another spray of Boeshield T-9 to lock in the magic. It's like $50 worth of chemicals, but well worth the money if you never have to wash or lube your bikes.
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Old 04-24-21, 08:37 AM
  #48  
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Originally Posted by tlorenz View Post
Just wondering if anyone knows how to make some Chain Lube? I am currently in India and I have asked around a few places and no one has chain lube, but there must be 500 million bicycles in India, so they have to use something. Just wondering if anyone has some tips of what to do.

I have heard a 3:1 ratio of mineral spirits to motor oil will work. I can just imagine myself now asking for mineral spirits here and getting a head wobble (those who have been here will know what that is like). Can I use paint thinner? Should I use another de-greaser? What kind of oil (is 10-30 fine, or is there something better)?

If someone knows of one that works well in dry weather (it shouldn't rain for at least another 2 months) that would be great. There is a lot of dust here and having a lube that picks up everything isn't the greatest (however I am close to being desperate and will take any lube soon).

Any help would be appreciated, and I thank you in advance.
In India, we used to use a mixture of kerosene and coconut oil. The kero prevents rust and coconut oil is a less viscous thin oil at temperatures in India. Suggest equal parts ... you actually need very little. Kerosene was used to clean the parts such as screws, chain, etc dismantled from the bike.

Grease for the ball bearings.

The bike itself was cleaned with a cloth and just a dab of coconut oil.

Biking since the 50s!!

Last edited by Pkan; 04-24-21 at 08:38 AM. Reason: Typo
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Old 04-24-21, 01:49 PM
  #49  
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How about using wax from melted candles when you put the chain in wax and later on let it dry?
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Old 04-24-21, 02:25 PM
  #50  
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Automatic Transmission fluid (ATF) is a good sub for chain lube. It cleans well and leaves a very thin film with excellent lubrication qualities.
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