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Good strong cantilever for a Sport Touring Bike

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Good strong cantilever for a Sport Touring Bike

Old 02-05-09, 08:10 PM
  #1  
kawasakiguy37
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Good strong cantilever for a Sport Touring Bike

What are some good cantilevers for a touring bike? I have a lotus sport touring bike from the 80s that came with normal style road brakes and 27" wheels. I want to eventually upgrade to 700's, and run at least 32's (I have the 27 inch equivelent of 32 right now) or maybe even 35's (not knobbies though). I also want to run fenders, and Im not sure if that would be possible with the road brakes. I have avid shorty 6's on my cross bike, should I just get another set of those are is there something better?
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Old 02-05-09, 10:37 PM
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digitalbicycle
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Just to clarify, are you talking about adding cantilever studs to your Lotus or using a different frame?
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Old 02-06-09, 03:21 AM
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I want to add cantilever studs if possible

edit:

I coudl throw the avids on my lotus if there were better brakes for my cross bike as well

Last edited by kawasakiguy37; 02-06-09 at 03:46 AM.
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Old 02-06-09, 01:45 PM
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IRD does some good cantis.

Also look at the choices on www.rivbike.com, there are plenty on there all are good
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Old 02-06-09, 01:58 PM
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Maybe I'm missing something here, but - from the kinds of wheels, tires and brakes you are talking about it seems like you're trying to create a pretty heavy duty touring bike.

I think that adding cantilever studs to your bike will require going to a frame builder, forking over a fair amount of $$, and then ending up with new brakes that are adding stress to your fork and seat stays in places that it wasn't designed to.

Rather than investing this amount of money in a "sport touring" bike, why not start over with a touring frame that is closer to the end game? There are plenty of complete touring bikes and/or touring frames the same quality and vintage of your Lotus that you can find on eBay or Craiglist for really reasonable prices.

Investing in new wheels seems like a good bet to me if you're unhappy with your current wheel, 'cause you can always move them to the next bike. But investing in frame modification to a "sport touring" bike makes less sense to me unless you are really going to be happy spending more money on an old frame than a new frame would cost.

I say this as someone who likes and owns old bikes; I've spent a lot more upgrading them than I did buying them but I try to think about not over-improving them either nor turning them into something they wouldn't do well.

Sorry if I am missing the point with this post - just a perspective.
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Old 02-06-09, 02:21 PM
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also think about long reach calipers like the tekro's they work very well, and will allow for bigger tires and mudguards... no frame mods needed
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Old 02-06-09, 02:26 PM
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Originally Posted by positron View Post
also think about long reach calipers like the tekro's they work very well, and will allow for bigger tires and mudguards... no frame mods needed
Great point.

If you can put on 700c's in place of 27"'s you may pick up enough clearance for the tires and fenders you want. Then all you need is long-reach brakes with enough adjustment to make the wheel conversion work.
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Old 02-08-09, 06:06 AM
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Im fine with road calipers actually, they are way easier to keep adjusted. The bike is a sport touring bike, but seems pretty sturdy. I think I could add a fair amount of weight to the rear rack (no rack holes on the frame though....it just clamps on). Im a light guy too (145 lbs), so I dont think Im stressing the bike too much, or is this a bad idea?
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Old 02-08-09, 05:07 PM
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The road calipers might actually work better than the touring canti's anyway. The best canti's I have seen are the Paul Components touring canti's.I have them on my bike because I am a purist, but the Shimano long reach dual pivots work better if they fit your application. Also, I used the Carradice saddle bags from Rivendell bicycles to great effect on my bikes that had no rear rack mounts. I can highly recommend them for light touring duty.
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Old 02-08-09, 06:57 PM
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Another option would be to replace the front fork with on that has canti studs and go canti front and caliper rear since the front does most of the work anyway.
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