Touring Have a dream to ride a bike across your state, across the country, or around the world? Self-contained or fully supported? Trade ideas, adventures, and more in our bicycle touring forum.

Stove Talk

Reply

Old 03-01-09, 08:42 AM
  #1  
brookyates
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 5
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Stove Talk

I am prepping for the ACA northern tier route and I had a stove question. I have never heard of a wood burning stove before a recent post. Can someone send me info, suggestions, opinions etc..

I have a whisper lite stove from MSR - pro - can find fuel anywhere - con - heavy and multiple parts

I was also looking into the Jet Boil, Pocket Rocket and Snow Peak - pro - small and light - con - must find specific fuel canisters and I am concerned about finding stores that will carry this type of canister (especially in the middle of the midwest).

Thanks!
Brook
brookyates is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-09, 09:10 AM
  #2  
michaelb05
Member
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Vermont
Posts: 33
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I posted on the other thread about my wood stove, the bushbuddy. You could consider carrying esbit as a backup, or as your primary stove, if you are looking for the lightest weight and/or have simple boil water cooking plans. Esbit can be shipped ahead by mail and ordered online if needed. It should be widely available in hunting and sporting goods stores, and is cheap. The titanium esbit stove weighs 13.5 grams, so the entire weight is in carrying a few tablets (I would bring a wind screen, aluminum foil at least).

http://www.lighthound.com/Tibetan-Ti...ve_p_2582.html

Going to an ultra light canister + esbit as backup would be way lighter and less bulky then the good ole whisper light (assuming you won't be regularly below freezing in temps). I haven't used an alcohol stove, but that is the other light weight alternative, and alcohol can be found anywhere.
michaelb05 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-09, 09:20 AM
  #3  
staehpj1 
Senior Member
 
staehpj1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Posts: 9,203
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 150 Post(s)
Originally Posted by brookyates View Post
I was also looking into the Jet Boil, Pocket Rocket and Snow Peak - pro - small and light - con - must find specific fuel canisters and I am concerned about finding stores that will carry this type of canister (especially in the middle of the midwest).
If the NT is like the TA you won't find iso butane for a major part of the trip. I suspect the NT is a bit better in that regard, but there are probably still places where you won't find it.

The iso butane is still doable. The cartridges last a long time and you can either mail them ahead or have someone at home mail them to you via general delivery. No more than 3 are allowed in a package. The package must have the following label attached on the address side of the package:
"Surface Mail Only
Consumer commodity
ORM-D"

If you send them via general delivery they will hold them 30 days. You can go to any post office and tell them where it was sent and have it forwarded. That buys you 30 more days and is also handy if you are either not ready for the fuel when you go past that post office or pass it when it is closed.
staehpj1 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-09, 09:37 AM
  #4  
northboundtrain
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 152
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I would opt for an alcohol stove, and I wouldn't even consider anything else. Bike touring is a little different from other forms of camping/travel, which makes the alcohol stove ideal. For one, the fuel is available everywhere. HEET fuel line de-icer is sold in little 12 oz. bottles, and can be had in almost any convenience store. Otherwise, you can buy a quart of denatured alcohol in a hardware store.

The main drawback of an alcohol stove is that the fuel contains about one half the BTUs of other fuels like white gas. So if you were taking a 10 day backpacking trip, you'd have to carry twice the volume of fuel. But this obviously isn't an issue while bike touring since you can re-supply anytime. I've found that a bottle of HEET will last me a few days. I really like that I only have to carry 12 oz or less at any given time.

Regarding the other options:

Forget about a cannister stove. You will not find the cannisters anywhere -- outdoor stores are few and far between on a cross-country route.

A wood burning stove would be extremely dirty and a huge hassle. Also finding dry tinder would be next to impossible if it's raining. I could see a wood burning stove for someone who's into very primitive camping just for the sake of it, but I'd never consider it for bike touring.

White gas stoves like the whisperlite are indeed prodigious heat makers, but you will find that you have to buy the fuel in one gallon containers at a Wal-Mart or hardware store. It's very rare to find white gas sold in smaller quantities except again in a dedicated outdoor store. As far as burning other fuels like unleaded gasoline, it's entirely feasible, but it's very dirty and you will be constantly cleaning/unclogging your stove and getting soot all over your stuff. Even just filling up your fuel bottle at a gas pump is a messy hassle.

There are other benefits to the alcohol stove:

No moving parts, and nothing to clog up.
It's by far the lightest, least expensive, and most compact type of stove.
It's the cleanest burning -- no soot whatsoever -- and least toxic type of fuel.
You can easily make a stove out of readily available materials.

Here's a good commercial stove option: http://www.rei.com/product/657906

If you do a search, you will find ample information on making your own stove out of a soda or tin can. There's really no need to make your own, but it's not a bad idea to read up on it, so you could make one in a pinch if you had to. The simplest is a small tin can, like a tomato paste can, with a dozen or so small holes punched in a ring around it about half way up the side. Place this can in a tuna can priming pan, and there's your stove.

Last edited by northboundtrain; 03-01-09 at 09:45 AM.
northboundtrain is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-09, 09:45 AM
  #5  
Mr. Jim
Bike Nerd
 
Mr. Jim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Mid- Michigan
Posts: 579

Bikes: mid 80's Fuji Supreme (commuter), LeRun unicycle thingy Raleigh Centrurion

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
doh, just answered your question on the other thread.

http://www.zzstove.com/

I have used different models of the above for over 20 years, I love it. I do have a whisperlite also, which I only use if conditions warrant such as winter camping or traveling in very high fire risk areas or above tree line.

The woodburners will black your pots, never understood peoples problem with that, simply wash both the outside and the inside when you are done and no problem, if it doesn't come off when you wash it it isn't gonna get on stuff. That said mine travels wrapped in an old bandanna and tucked in my pot.

Any specific question feel free to ask, I see very few woodburners in the wild and would love to talk about them.

I find the woodburner to be the most convenient stove I have ever used. Using the fire starter sticks I mentioned in the other thread I have burnt stuff we pulled out of a creek, fuel has never been a problem and as long as you clean up I find the soot less of an issue than dealing with a fuel leak with other stoves.

Last edited by Mr. Jim; 03-01-09 at 09:48 AM.
Mr. Jim is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-09, 09:58 AM
  #6  
kayakdiver
ah.... sure.
 
kayakdiver's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Whidbey Island WA
Posts: 4,107

Bikes: Specialized.... schwinn..... enough to fill my needs..

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Originally Posted by northboundtrain View Post
I would opt for an alcohol stove, and I wouldn't even consider anything else. Bike touring is a little different from other forms of camping/travel, which makes the alcohol stove ideal. For one, the fuel is available everywhere. HEET fuel line de-icer is sold in little 12 oz. bottles, and can be had in almost any convenience store. Otherwise, you can buy a quart of denatured alcohol in a hardware store.

The main drawback of an alcohol stove is that the fuel contains about one half the BTUs of other fuels like white gas. So if you were taking a 10 day backpacking trip, you'd have to carry twice the volume of fuel. But this obviously isn't an issue while bike touring since you can re-supply anytime. I've found that a bottle of HEET will last me a few days. I really like that I only have to carry 12 oz or less at any given time.

Regarding the other options:

Forget about a cannister stove. You will not find the cannisters anywhere -- outdoor stores are few and far between on a cross-country route.

A wood burning stove would be extremely dirty and a huge hassle. Also finding dry tinder would be next to impossible if it's raining. I could see a wood burning stove for someone who's into very primitive camping just for the sake of it, but I'd never consider it for bike touring.

White gas stoves like the whisperlite are indeed prodigious heat makers, but you will find that you have to buy the fuel in one gallon containers at a Wal-Mart or hardware store. It's very rare to find white gas sold in smaller quantities except again in a dedicated outdoor store. As far as burning other fuels like unleaded gasoline, it's entirely feasible, but it's very dirty and you will be constantly cleaning/unclogging your stove and getting soot all over your stuff. Even just filling up your fuel bottle at a gas pump is a messy hassle.

There are other benefits to the alcohol stove:

No moving parts, and nothing to clog up.
It's by far the lightest, least expensive, and most compact type of stove.
It's the cleanest burning -- no soot whatsoever -- and least toxic type of fuel.
You can easily make a stove out of readily available materials.

Here's a good commercial stove option: http://www.rei.com/product/657906

If you do a search, you will find ample information on making your own stove out of a soda or tin can. There's really no need to make your own, but it's not a bad idea to read up on it, so you could make one in a pinch if you had to. The simplest is a small tin can, like a tomato paste can, with a dozen or so small holes punched in a ring around it about half way up the side. Place this can in a tuna can priming pan, and there's your stove.
I was surprised at how many retailers carry the smaller plastic red coleman fuel bottles on the Northern tier. Lots of grocery stores and most all the walmarts and even small gas stations. It seems to me that retailers like them because they take up less space. I brought my cannister stove and regretted it. Wished I had brought my white gas stove that was sitting at home.

Would suggest that you go with what you have. No reason to worry about a few ounces for something that is already paid for and works well. That being said. I would look at the white gas simmerlite from MSR. 5 oz or so and you can use your current fuel bottles. Plus you can turn the heat down pretty well for cooking if you want.
kayakdiver is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-09, 11:21 AM
  #7  
northboundtrain
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 152
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Originally Posted by kyakdiver View Post
I was surprised at how many retailers carry the smaller plastic red coleman fuel bottles on the Northern tier. Lots of grocery stores and most all the walmarts and even small gas stations.
I gave up on trying to find white gas in small quantities years ago, so my information is indeed dated. I guess things have changed.

So assuming you can find white gas in 1 quart or less quantities, and if you plan doing on lots of cooking, i.e., hot dinners and breakfasts most of the time, then the whisperlite would be a good choice.

Nevertheless, it wouldn't hurt to experiment with the tomato-paste-can-in-a-tuna-can set up and see if you like it. HEET will still be the most readily available fuel found on the road, and in the event you can't find white gas in a manageable quantity, you have a back-up option. You might find -- like I did -- that you just prefer the simplicity, light weight, cleanliness, and convenience of an alcohol stove anyway.

BTW, aluminum oven liner sheet/pans make good wind screens with the above set up.
northboundtrain is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-09, 12:01 PM
  #8  
wahoonc
Membership Not Required
 
wahoonc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: On the road-USA
Posts: 16,849

Bikes: Giant Excursion, Raleigh Sports, Raleigh R.S.W. Compact, Motobecane? and about 20 more! OMG

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 65 Post(s)
Originally Posted by northboundtrain View Post
I gave up on trying to find white gas in small quantities years ago, so my information is indeed dated. I guess things have changed.

So assuming you can find white gas in 1 quart or less quantities, and if you plan doing on lots of cooking, i.e., hot dinners and breakfasts most of the time, then the whisperlite would be a good choice.

Nevertheless, it wouldn't hurt to experiment with the tomato-paste-can-in-a-tuna-can set up and see if you like it. HEET will still be the most readily available fuel found on the road, and in the event you can't find white gas in a manageable quantity, you have a back-up option. You might find -- like I did -- that you just prefer the simplicity, light weight, cleanliness, and convenience of an alcohol stove anyway.

BTW, aluminum oven liner sheet/pans make good wind screens with the above set up.
When I first started touring way back when you could only get white gas in gallons. BUT if you stayed at campgrounds getting a pint off of someone was easy, most campers back then were still using the old white gas Coleman cook stoves. Those days are gone, I went car camping a few weeks back and I would bet we were the only people in the campground with a white gas stove (had a propane rig too) I had not seen the quarts of Crown Camp Fuel until just recently. FWIW some of the MSR stove will burn unleaded automobile gas, but expect to clean a lot more.

I still run an MSR Whisperlite International as my main camp stove. I never used alcohol because of the low btu issue. Looks like I might revisit that.

If you stay in commercial campgrounds you could haul an electric hot plate with you (I have actually seen a guy that was cycle touring that had a Mr Coffee 4 cup coffee maker with him)

There are many options out there and they all have their advantages/disadvantages, choose the one that works best for you.

Aaron
__________________
Webshots is bailing out, if you find any of my posts with corrupt picture files and want to see them corrected please let me know. :(

ISO: A late 1980's Giant Iguana MTB frameset (or complete bike) 23" Red with yellow graphics.

"Cycling should be a way of life, not a hobby.
RIDE, YOU FOOL, RIDE!"
_Nicodemus

"Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
Aluminum: barely a hundred
Which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?"
_krazygluon
wahoonc is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-09, 07:58 PM
  #9  
sknhgy 
Dirt Bomb
 
sknhgy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Illinois
Posts: 2,738
Mentioned: 41 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2264 Post(s)
You know, like everything, I think you have to find out what works for you.
I've been experimenting with stoves - homemade alcohol stoves. I've made about 5 different ones so far. Making stoves is a good winter-evening activity. I like to take one along with me on a day ride and stop off somewhere and brew up a cup of tea. That way I get experience with the stove. This summer, when I go for my 1 week ride I will be familiar with the stove I take.
I like the ideas everyone has been posting. I hadn't considered using a wood stove. The only one I have is made out of a tomato juice can and it's too big to be hauling around on the bike. The thought of a woodfire is very comforting, though.
I also like the idea of the nesbit tabs.
One I've seen recently, but haven't had time to try, is merely discs of paper towel slightly smaller than the base of your pot. You lightly saturate the disc with alcohol, place your pot on top and fire it up. You get a ring of fire around the base of your pot. The main drawback I've read about is that if you lift off your pot before the fire goes out you have a flare-up.
Around here in Illinois everything is green in the summer, and wildfires are usually not a concern. I could see where that is a problem out west.
__________________
more cops have been killed by donuts than guns in chicago it is a medical fact ask any doctor.
sknhgy is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-09, 08:08 PM
  #10  
AsanaCycles
Bicycle Lifestyle
 
AsanaCycles's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Pacific Grove, Ca
Posts: 1,737

Bikes: Neil Pryde Diablo, VeloVie Vitesse400, Hunter29er, Surly Big Dummy

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Kifaru shelters and stoves
some pics

really it comes down to your comfort level

the tipi has lots of living space, stove inside, a clothes line, etc...

lots of stuff here

and a short ramble here.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg
IMG_0093.jpg (76.2 KB, 29 views)
File Type: jpg
IMG_0106.jpg (87.4 KB, 40 views)
File Type: jpg
IMG_2373.jpg (18.4 KB, 13 views)
File Type: jpg
IMG_3059.jpg (52.6 KB, 29 views)
File Type: jpg
IMG_3374.jpg (86.7 KB, 24 views)
File Type: jpg
IMG_3432.jpg (63.2 KB, 32 views)
File Type: jpg
IMG_3449.jpg (43.9 KB, 25 views)
File Type: jpg
IMG_3450.jpg (76.8 KB, 17 views)
File Type: jpg
IMG_0462.jpg (79.2 KB, 31 views)
File Type: jpg
IMG_2051.jpg (42.9 KB, 15 views)

Last edited by AsanaCycles; 03-01-09 at 08:13 PM.
AsanaCycles is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-09, 08:16 PM
  #11  
rodar y rodar
weirdo
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Reno, NV
Posts: 1,962
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I`m surprised to hear that butane canisters can be hard to find in many areas. I`ve never used them or looked specifically for them, but I had the impression that they were taking over from the white gas stuff (lanterns as well as stoves). We have both around here now but it seems to me that butane use is growing fast- 15 or 20 years ago, you never saw it, then it started showing up here and there, now the big box stores cary ONLY butane equipment (though they still have fuel for regular Coleman stuff).
rodar y rodar is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-09, 08:22 PM
  #12  
zoltani
sniffin' glue
 
zoltani's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Seattle
Posts: 3,182

Bikes: Surly crosscheck ssfg, Custom vintage french racing bike, Bruce Gordon Rock & Road

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
OK, I'm a little confused.

I've got an old coleman exponent stove that uses coleman fuel, or the crown camp fuel. I was planning on using this stove on the TA with the fuel bottle filled and carrying an extra quart of the crown camp fuel. Am I going to have a hard time finding this fuel? I was under the impression that it was pretty common, and have even seen it in gas stations, but that was near wilderness areas.
What about the availability in Europe? What is the best choice?
zoltani is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-09, 08:27 PM
  #13  
vja4Him
GadgetJim57
 
vja4Him's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Central California
Posts: 778

Bikes: Yuba Sweet Curry eBike, Surly Long Haul Trucker

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 48 Post(s)
Are there any good alcohol stoves that allow for a controlled flame?

Originally Posted by michaelb05 View Post
I posted on the other thread about my wood stove, the bushbuddy. You could consider carrying esbit as a backup, or as your primary stove, if you are looking for the lightest weight and/or have simple boil water cooking plans. Esbit can be shipped ahead by mail and ordered online if needed. It should be widely available in hunting and sporting goods stores, and is cheap. The titanium esbit stove weighs 13.5 grams, so the entire weight is in carrying a few tablets (I would bring a wind screen, aluminum foil at least).

http://www.lighthound.com/Tibetan-Ti...ve_p_2582.html

Going to an ultra light canister + esbit as backup would be way lighter and less bulky then the good ole whisper light (assuming you won't be regularly below freezing in temps). I haven't used an alcohol stove, but that is the other light weight alternative, and alcohol can be found anywhere.
vja4Him is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-09, 08:38 PM
  #14  
kayakdiver
ah.... sure.
 
kayakdiver's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Whidbey Island WA
Posts: 4,107

Bikes: Specialized.... schwinn..... enough to fill my needs..

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Originally Posted by zoltani View Post
OK, I'm a little confused.

I've got an old coleman exponent stove that uses coleman fuel, or the crown camp fuel. I was planning on using this stove on the TA with the fuel bottle filled and carrying an extra quart of the crown camp fuel. Am I going to have a hard time finding this fuel? I was under the impression that it was pretty common, and have even seen it in gas stations, but that was near wilderness areas.
What about the availability in Europe? What is the best choice?
If you see my post above you will find that it will be easier to find white gas/coleman than cannisters in the middle of the country. This was my experience in 2008 on the Northern Tier route. I wished I had brought my white gas/msr stove over my msr cannister stove(simmerlite). You will be fine. At walmarts you will be able to purchase those red bottles. I think they are about a liter in size so you don't have to purchase a gallon at a time.
kayakdiver is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-09, 08:47 PM
  #15  
Camel
Caffeinated.
 
Camel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Waltham, MA
Posts: 1,541

Bikes: Waterford 1900, Quintana Roo Borrego, Trek 8700zx, Bianchi Pista Concept

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
The pocket rocket is a nice little stove. It simmers too. I use a windscreen (standard MSR thick foil type), which helps reduce fuel waste from blowing wind. -Or I set it up with a natural windblock (logs, rocks etc etc).

That would be the stove I would take, since you asked, or a jet boil (if you only boil water).

Fuel canisters last a pretty goodly time, and you can carry extra's without worry.

I took a pocket rocket on my year tour, and used it just about exclusively. I had brought along a multi-fuel as well, and never needed to use it once. I sold the multi-fuel stove to another tourist in Kathmandu (Thanks Chris!).
Camel is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-09, 08:51 PM
  #16  
wahoonc
Membership Not Required
 
wahoonc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: On the road-USA
Posts: 16,849

Bikes: Giant Excursion, Raleigh Sports, Raleigh R.S.W. Compact, Motobecane? and about 20 more! OMG

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 65 Post(s)
Originally Posted by vja4Him View Post
Are there any good alcohol stoves that allow for a controlled flame?
The best I have seen for controlling flame is the Trangia and it isn't perfect, takes a bit of finesse to get it just right. I have a buddy that always takes his with him, he does everything I do with my MSR, just a bit slower and in smaller batches.

Aaron
__________________
Webshots is bailing out, if you find any of my posts with corrupt picture files and want to see them corrected please let me know. :(

ISO: A late 1980's Giant Iguana MTB frameset (or complete bike) 23" Red with yellow graphics.

"Cycling should be a way of life, not a hobby.
RIDE, YOU FOOL, RIDE!"
_Nicodemus

"Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
Aluminum: barely a hundred
Which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?"
_krazygluon
wahoonc is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-09, 10:22 PM
  #17  
Bekologist
totally louche
 
Bekologist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: A land that time forgot
Posts: 18,025

Bikes: the ever shifting stable loaded with comfortable road bikes and city and winter bikes

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Alcohol stove for the win! Burns HEET and much other denatured alcohols and even high test rum and stuff (a shame)

I have NEVER liked using wood for fuel. and I've been sleeping out for decades. its messy and smells
Bekologist is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 03-02-09, 07:16 AM
  #18  
KLW2
Senior Member
 
KLW2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: White Bear Lake Mn
Posts: 764

Bikes: 88 Schwin Voyageur, 84 Schwinn World Sport, 85 Univega Alpina Uno, 85 Fuji Espree, 09 Novara Strada, 06 Jamis Durango, 03 Specialized Expediton Sport, 09 Surly LHT, 12 Novara Gotham

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Brasslite is an alcohol stove that simmers quite well..I have a Trangia or would pick up one...
KLW2 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 03-02-09, 07:46 AM
  #19  
Standalone 
babylon by bike
 
Standalone's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: New Haven, CT, USA
Posts: 3,315

Bikes: Road, Cargo, Tandem, Etc.

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 83 Post(s)
Asana's pictures always make me hungry, especially that one with the chicken.... mmm
__________________
The bicycle, the bicycle surely, should always be the vehicle of novelists and poets. Christopher Morley
Standalone is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 03-02-09, 09:08 AM
  #20  
BigBlueToe
Senior Member
 
BigBlueToe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Central Coast, CA
Posts: 3,392

Bikes: Surly LHT, Specialized Rockhopper, Nashbar Touring (old), Specialized Stumpjumper (older), Nishiki Tourer (model unknown)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
I like a stove that burns unleaded. The easiest thing to find on most routes is a gas station. You can pretty much count on passing one every day. I use a Coleman 442 because that's what I bought 17 years ago and it's still working fine. If it quits I'd consider another 442 or a Whisperlite International.
BigBlueToe is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 03-02-09, 09:17 AM
  #21  
bikebuddha 
Senior Member
 
bikebuddha's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Somewhere in time
Posts: 1,137
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
I'm still using the same MSR Whisperlite that I have for the last 18 years. Why mess with something that works?
__________________
The few, the proud, the likely insane, Metro-Atlanta bicycle commuters.
bikebuddha is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 03-02-09, 12:35 PM
  #22  
markf
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Wheat Ridge, CO
Posts: 1,076

Bikes: '93 Bridgestone MB-3, '88 Marinoni road bike, '00 Marinoni Piuma, '01 Riv A/R

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
If you've got a Whisperlite, use it. You'll have plenty of other stuff to spend money on for this tour. A gallon can of generic white gas is less than $10 at WalMart, it'll last you a couple of weeks if you're traveling alone and cooking carefully. If you're in a group, split the fuel among all the group members to spread the weight around.

The MSR Alpine Cookset and the MSR Heat Exchanger isn't the lightest cooking setup around, but it's a good, sturdy, fuel efficient setup that should work well for a small group. The heat exchanger and the Whisperlite fit inside the pots with room for a few spices, etc., so its fairly compact. Bring the MSR windscreen and the repair kit and you should be set.

Trangia makes really nice alcohol stoves, alcohol stoves are a lot simpler to use than the Whisperlite but they don't cook as fast, the fuel costs more, and you'll need more of it.

The various gas cartridge stoves (Pocket Rocket, Jet Boil, etc.) are convenient to cook with, but the canisters get expensive. The different brands of canisters are getting easier to find, but not as easy to find as white gas or alcohol.
markf is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 03-02-09, 01:30 PM
  #23  
Boston Commuter
What, me hurry?
 
Boston Commuter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Boston, MA
Posts: 235

Bikes: Rivendell Atlantis, 1987 Peugeot Iseran mixte

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Here's a comparative review of lots of backpacking stoves, with a bias toward alcohol stoves. Hope this is helpful:

http://zenstoves.net/
Boston Commuter is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 03-02-09, 02:12 PM
  #24  
markf
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Wheat Ridge, CO
Posts: 1,076

Bikes: '93 Bridgestone MB-3, '88 Marinoni road bike, '00 Marinoni Piuma, '01 Riv A/R

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Originally Posted by zoltani View Post
OK, I'm a little confused.

I've got an old coleman exponent stove that uses coleman fuel, or the crown camp fuel. I was planning on using this stove on the TA with the fuel bottle filled and carrying an extra quart of the crown camp fuel. Am I going to have a hard time finding this fuel? I was under the impression that it was pretty common, and have even seen it in gas stations, but that was near wilderness areas.
What about the availability in Europe? What is the best choice?
How old is your stove? I don't see that stove on the Coleman website.

Crown camp fuel is awfully similar to Coleman fuel/Blazo/white gas, AFAIK. They are all white gas with some anti-rust additives and maybe something to make the fuel less volatile. If you can't find crown camp fuel then Coleman fuel, Blazo or the Wal-Mart generic stuff will do just as well, I seriously doubt that there is a significant difference, and one of those fuels will be available just about anywhere. You can always use unleaded auto fuel in a pinch, but the soot and the smell and the clogging make this a last resort, IMO. You can also use MSR Superfuel, which comes in a very attractive container and costs a fortune. I seriously doubt that it's any different than the other white gas brands, though. Plan on spending at least as much for a quart can of any white gas type fuel as you would for a gallon of Wal-Mart brand white gas, and the Wal-Mart stuff works just as well.

White gas/Coleman fuel/whatever is hard to find in Europe and unbelievably expensive. I paid GBP 6.50 for a 1/2 liter can of Coleman fuel in Edinburgh a few years back, which works out to almost US$70/gallon at todays exchange rates. Bleuet cartridge stoves seem to be the most popular option in lots of European countries. You can also get MSR-style threaded gas cartridges if you look around, but the Bleuet seem to be cheaper.

If I camp in Europe again, I will probably bring my Trangia cookset and use denatured alcohol.
markf is offline  
Reply With Quote

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service