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I'm about to become a bipolar Cervelo loving tourist

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I'm about to become a bipolar Cervelo loving tourist

Old 03-19-09, 08:15 PM
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I'm about to become a bipolar Cervelo loving tourist

I rode in the 70's and owned 4 different road bikes. I quite in the early 80's and got back into it three years ago. I've owned three bikes during this time, the latest being a Cervelo R3. I am not a racer but I love riding at a fast pace sometimes. I tried seven different bikes ranging from $2300 - $5000. I did not care about whether the bike was super light or super stiff or used top end components. I just cared about whether it rang my chimes. The Cervelo did it for me and I could afford it and bought it. I love riding it. Some people would say I committed heresy because I put a titanium railed Brooks swallow saddle on it.

On January 3, my world turned upside down. I had an intracerebral hemorrhage while on a 50 mile ride cruising between 23 and 24 mph. I was lucky. I survived. My doctor said I could start riding again if I kept my heart rate BELOW 120. That must be akin to getting into a Ferrari and never getting out of first gear. It drove me nuts. My heart rate alarm was constantly going off as I hit a head wind or a little hill. On one windy day, I got so frustrated, I quit and went home.

I'm now healed enough that I can ride faster and begin getting some satisfaction, but I'll never be allowed to push it to the limit again.

Recently I contacted some aquaintances to ride with them. They ride 60-70 miles a day at a relaxed pace. They said come on. However, the warning was "We're riding fully loaded, because we are preparing to go on a 7 day self supported camping trip and we will be ridiing slow".

Can you imaging a motley crew that included a fully loaded SWB recumbent, a Heron touring cycle with front and rear panniers, and Cervelo R3 with nothing more than bare essentials to repair a flat? The Heron rider joked "One of my panniers weighs more than your whole bike!"

Imagine me riding with my bar position 3 1/2" below the saddle on an elite racing bike tooling along at 10-13 mph for 65 miles. I LOVED IT! We talked and looked at the countryside. We stopped a few times for coffee. I had a pecan fried pie at one of the stops. I didn't consume electrolyte secret sport potions. I drank plain water.

Today, I got a quote for a Raleigh Sojourn at my favorite LBS - the same one that sold me my Cervelo.

If I actually go through with this purchase, I do not plan to sell the Cervelo. I just wonder if I will be able to enjoy both styles of riding and both bikes. Is that possible? Do any of you find yourself in both worlds and enjoying both?

Bob
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Old 03-19-09, 08:24 PM
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Of course you'll enjoy both.... heck I love riding my Giant TCR and then jumping on the Jamis Aurora in the same day. Both are fun and serve a purpose. The relaxed fit of a touring bike lets you see what around you......... nothing wrong with that.
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Old 03-19-09, 09:08 PM
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As a ex Cervelo owner, you'll be fine, I couldn't afford two bikes and wasn't racing anymore so my Cervelo went away, but my LHT is nice and I enjoy it every bit as much, just not at the same speed.
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Old 03-19-09, 09:14 PM
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I spent almost 10 years racing, and I still love to ride hard in a group. It excites me; there is nothing like rolling along the beach at a fast clip to end the day, or pushing yourself just to see what you can do. But I also cherish every mile of a tour. Those are different miles, more for me to be quiet and explore and be in the moment. I love them both, but I have to say that touring fills the soul in a different way, one that I would never want to give up.
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Old 03-20-09, 07:22 AM
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Do not put a computer on it. If you don't know how fast you are going, it won't bother you.
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Old 03-20-09, 07:54 AM
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Riding fast excites me too, but luckily, even when young, I liked to see, smell and feel the places I was riding through, so that made me more of a randonneur than a racer. I say lucky, because riding like that, I've managed to survive and ride on as an older man despite many medical problems along the way. Exercise and excitement are good, but there's no point in killing yourself, is there? The image of the man in the brain is always 25, but the body of the man is 55, going on 60. The man in the brain might be attracted to the racy-looking plastic high-tech wonder, but the body of the man should walk out of the LBS with something more realistic and more useful.
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Old 03-20-09, 08:27 AM
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The OP sounds like a good candidate for a sport touring bike and a bit of credit card or light weight touring.
The Sojourn looks like a decent tourer, but I'd look at some slightly sportier options from manufacturers like Waterford, Co-Motion, Rivendell, Mercian, Independent Fabrications etc. I love my Rivendell Rambouillet; I can do lightweight fully loaded touring on it and also strip it down to do fast day rides.
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Old 03-20-09, 09:16 AM
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I got a sport tourer about 11 years ago, which is still my only bike. There are a few things I might do differently now though, if I had the chance. For one, rather than "sport touring", I think I might be looking for more of a French-style randonneuse (current and past TOEIs are good examples). I've argued against 650B myself on these forums in the past, but my thinking has changed. Unfortunately, my budget has not changed, and I'll probably never own one.

But I do remain convinced that most people who want to ride should ignore the Cervelos and their ilk, and look at metal-framed audax, brevet or randonneering type of bikes. Not as flashy-looking as the full-carbon rigs, but certainly more handsome, and definitely more suited to the real riding that 90% of the Cervelo owners do (if they ride at all after the honeymoon is over).

The randonneur who rides a lot but more moderately probably gains more long term fitness with less risk of injury than the racer types anyway. Plus, the road is always better than the destination, so what's the rush?

Last edited by Longfemur; 03-20-09 at 09:23 AM.
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Old 03-20-09, 09:24 AM
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Do you want to ride fully loaded? Do you enjoy camping? Would you want to camp often? If the answer to any of these is no, I'd look more into randonneuring or century riding.
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Old 03-20-09, 09:51 AM
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You guys have got me thinking. I appreciate all the thoughts and experiences. Keep them coming. I am wondering if I ought to just throw a carradice bag on the back of my Cervelo for a few months and do different kinds of ridiing to see what its like. I can ignore the raspberries and laughter from the racer crowd. They would call me a Fred and tell how I've ruined a great bike.

The cervelo has the advantage that its paid for and in excellent condition. I didn't buy it for what it looks like. I bought it because of how it feels when I accelerate and go up hills and how rested I feel after a 50 mile ride. I've been riding it for seven months and that feeling has not abated. Sorry guys, this is silly to be talking this bike in the touring forum. But talking about the kinds of riding is very useful.

I don't really know the definitions of randonneuse, sport-touring, credit card or light weight touring, light weight fully loaded touring. I think I get the definition of fully loaded touring.

Riding for a day with a small day bag has a great appeal to me. I think I also want to experience riding for a few days staying in a hotel along the way.

I've done camping with my son who loves backpacking and hiking. He's expressed an interest in doing something on a bike.

Bob
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Old 03-20-09, 10:25 AM
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Originally Posted by wrobertdavis
You guys have got me thinking. I appreciate all the thoughts and experiences. Keep them coming. I am wondering if I ought to just throw a carradice bag on the back of my Cervelo for a few months and do different kinds of ridiing to see what its like. I can ignore the raspberries and laughter from the racer crowd. They would call me a Fred and tell how I've ruined a great bike.

The cervelo has the advantage that its paid for and in excellent condition. I didn't buy it for what it looks like. I bought it because of how it feels when I accelerate and go up hills and how rested I feel after a 50 mile ride. I've been riding it for seven months and that feeling has not abated. Sorry guys, this is silly to be talking this bike in the touring forum. But talking about the kinds of riding is very useful.

I don't really know the definitions of randonneuse, sport-touring, credit card or light weight touring, light weight fully loaded touring. I think I get the definition of fully loaded touring.

Riding for a day with a small day bag has a great appeal to me. I think I also want to experience riding for a few days staying in a hotel along the way.

I've done camping with my son who loves backpacking and hiking. He's expressed an interest in doing something on a bike.

Bob
I think you have a plane here, You have the saddle for a Carradice so load up and off you go. The only issue I'd have with the cervelo is the skinny tyre size and the riding position, but try it and see how you like it.

FYI here are a few ways I define some of the terms used in this thread.

randonneuse: a nice ride in the country, sometimes these are organized and with time limits, but there's no prize for 1st place

sport-touring: a bike geometry half way between racer and touring bike.

credit card touring: no camping equipment, you stay in hotels and eat in restaurants. As I get a bit older this is becoming my favourite way to travel, nothing is as good as a warm shower and a soft bed at the end of a day in the saddle.

light weight "fully loaded" touring: you have everything you need to survive, tent, pad, sleeping bag etc but keep the weight of the gear to a minimum. It uses equipment and techniques pioneered by the ultralight camping folks. You end up with 90% of the utility of a fully loaded set of gear carried in 4 panniers and a handle bar bag, but the gear weighs between 20 and 30 lbs and fits in a handlebar bag and a couple of small panniers or a saddlebag
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Old 03-20-09, 07:03 PM
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If this bike is the most comfortable one you've ridden, and to boot is light and effortless to pedal, and you don't plan on carrying much on it, why change?

Sure, if you are planning on carrying a week's worth of gear and supplies on bad roads, you might be better off with a different bike. But that dosen't sound like what you're proposing.

BTW if you pack light you can certainly fit enough gear in a handlebar bag, saddle bag and jersey pockets. Or a Tubus titanium rear rack attached to the rear axle/skewer and seatpost clamp bosses, to prevent frame damage.
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Old 03-20-09, 07:19 PM
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What cave said....
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Old 03-23-09, 04:29 PM
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Postscript thoughts (or evolutionary if you look at it that way)

In the past two weeks I've had some brief but interesting experiences that were definitely influenced by comments from you guys on this thread. Thank you all again for your comments.

I rode three rides without a glance at my speed or my cadence. I rode by "feel". Sometimes I rode fast. Most of the time I rode slow - very slow. I crawled up the hills to keep my heart rate down. On one of these rides, I did a 40 mile urban tour with my wife. We actually talked while riding and looked at the old historic houses, etc. It was fun. The cervelo is not the right bike for this kind of riding. I have to ride at a certain minimum speed to be comfortable, where I balance weight between seat, bars, and peddles.

Today, on a lark, I went down to REI to take a spin on their Randonee. I've read about some of the short comings on this bike. I guess the chainstays aren't long enough for people with big feet and large panniers. The brakes did seem awfully weak to me. But it gave me a taste of something different. I felt the longer wheel base, larger tire, steel frame, more erect posture comfort. I would have really enjoyed this bike while riding with my wife. On a lark I put it in its lowest gear to see what that was like. I had the feeling the chain fell off the bike. Compared to what I am used to, the low gear is insanely low. I can see how this would help keep a heavy load moving. Also, compared to what I am used to, it takes a lot more effort to get this puppy going faster and keep it going. Those who say that its all about the engine and not the bike, have never ridden a high performance road bike.

Anyway, I'm kind of enthusiastic about this concept of relaxed geometry, steel frame and fat tires for comfortable sight seeing style trips. The LHT seems about where I might start, but I'm sure eyeing the Rivendell and Bruce Gordon websites.

Bob
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Old 03-23-09, 08:43 PM
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Sorry to hear about your condition, but however this all works out, it's a good thing to keep getting exercise & doing stuff you enjoy.

As to the Randonee, seems like it's a pretty good bike overall. Unlike some folks I don't think you have to go totally nuts with low gearing, but it does come in handy when lugging a load uphill. I'd have a real LBS do the maintenance on it, unless you're proficient.

As to the brakes, those Tektros are very common on touring bikes. You have a few options:
• change the brake shoes
• swap out the brakes altogether

I.e. expect to have to work on the brakes with any non-custom touring bike.
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Old 03-23-09, 09:25 PM
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Originally Posted by wrobertdavis

Anyway, I'm kind of enthusiastic about this concept of relaxed geometry, steel frame and fat tires for comfortable sight seeing style trips. The LHT seems about where I might start, but I'm sure eyeing the Rivendell and Bruce Gordon websites.

Bob
Those are two nice bike makes, as I said before I have Riv Rambouillet that I love, but their bikes now are a bit less sporty. The Hilsen or the new Hillborne might be good, but if you have some cash and want a sportier bike that you can do some light touring on and also go slow try to find a Rambouillet

https://www.cyclofiend.com/cc/2008/cc...aller0308.html

In fact I do some lightweight fully loaded touring on my Ram and regularly take it off road on forest tracks
and with 28 0r 32mm tyres it does very well.

or check out the following

https://waterfordbikes.com/now/models.php?Model=658

https://www.ifbikes.com/OurBikes/Road/Steel_Club_Racer_/

now is a good time to look at UK bikes too with the dollar being strong against the pound

https://www.merciancycles.co.uk/frame_king_mercia.asp
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