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Why? Sliding forward on saddle while riding/pedaling no hands?

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Why? Sliding forward on saddle while riding/pedaling no hands?

Old 03-27-09, 11:17 PM
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Why? Sliding forward on saddle while riding/pedaling no hands?

Went to test ride a touring bike. Everything was set up perfect according to my body dimensions. One problem I found was my butt wanting to slide forward after sitting up and pedaling the touring bike in a straight line at a leisurely cadence while riding "no hands"? In order to continue to ride no hands, I had to put one hand at the nose of the saddle to leverage my butt from wanting to move forward. Just some important facts to help your analysis:

* saddle was very comfortable and set perfectly level to the ground (checked with a level).
* saddle was mounted to seatpost clamp on the middle of it's rails.
* cranks are of correct length according to my Femur and Tibia bones.
* saddle height was correct according to my inseam.
* riding cadence was comfortable and relaxed; neither spinning like mad or grinding a massive gear.

I read a comment about this a while back that said, and let me paraphrase, "assuming that the seat is perfectly level, the most common assumption would be to steepen the seat tube angle since one's butt wants to go in that direction but the correct solution is to slacken the seat tube angle".

You're probably thinking, "why not just slide the seat forward or back to find out" but assuming the seat and seatpost are static (no rails on the seat to adjust for and aft position) what is the correct soultion to this problem? In otherwords, is the above assumption correct?

I hope I've posted this in the correct forum. All comments welcome.....

Last edited by matchy99; 03-29-09 at 05:04 AM.
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Old 03-27-09, 11:49 PM
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Check out this guy: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A0jBO...eature=related

Anyway, maybe you could try pushing your body up and back with your legs? It's possible to do this even while spinning. Fixed gear riders use this technique to unweigh their saddles for bumps.
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Old 03-28-09, 07:05 AM
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Do you ride no hands very often? I find it helps a lot to relieve back and arm stress for a short while as well as giving your upper body a good cross breeze. The wind resistance helps you slow down a bit on downhills too. But you have to completely change your position. If you just take your hands off while in a regular biking position, of course all of your weight is leaning forward and the little bit of hip motion from pedaling will bounce you forward bit by bit. When I ride no hands I am usually leaning a little bit back from vertical so my nose is roughly over top of the centre of my pelvis. It puts a lot of weight on your back wheel, so watch out if you are loaded heavily. If you still slide, then I think you should probably change your seat angle by bringing the nose up above horizontal a little bit.
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Old 03-28-09, 07:36 AM
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I think you were riding a bike one size too big. The the size is too big, you slide forward from the saddle. You might also want to test another saddle because some are more grippy than others. Another option would be to get a smaller stem.
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Old 03-28-09, 08:23 AM
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Just 2 things:

1) Saddle may be level overall, but that usually means the place your sit bones sit on it isn't. So, the minute you don't have arms holding you back on it, you slide forward. I don't know about anyone else, but I don't think I've ever seen a saddle that could truly be ridden when perfectly level overall. The nose almost always has to be up a bit, because the saddle itself always ends up being like a little cradle once you're sitting on it, no matter how flat it looks.

2) Saddle probably not quite behind the pedals enough. I don't advocate that saddle way back idea unless your riding a beach cruiser, but it should be just back enough that the act of pedaling itself pushes you back on it rather than encouraging you to slide forward.

If you feel yourself sliding forward no hands, you're sliding forward with hands too, except that your arms are what is holding you back on the saddle. That's not a good idea for anything longer than around the neighbourhood. It's a lot of unecessary pressure on your arms and hands.
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Old 03-28-09, 09:18 AM
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+1 for Longfemur's response

"In otherwords, is the above assumption correct?" I'd start by not assuming that the bike was 'set up perfectly'

I'd try tilting seat nose up (maybe a half turn on the back bolt if you have that kind of SP), a bit shorter stem (or a bit more rise), and perhaps moving the seat back a bit. ONE AT A TIME!! WITH SHORT RIDE AFTER EACH CHANGE! Or, stopping every 3 or 4 miles and trying a change. Take some tape along to note change (wrap around rail, move seat...)


Also remember that Hinault (and other riders of that era) tended to have seat position a bit more aft than current recommendations. Positions weren't quite so aggressively forward or head down either.
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Old 03-29-09, 04:59 AM
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Sorry I wasn't clear on my "no hands" riding position. When I was riding "no hands", my body was vertical, hands to the sides, with all my weight on the seat and pedals. I've made a slight change to the original post to rectify the vagueness.
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Old 03-29-09, 07:27 PM
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+1 Longfemur and reiffert

You probably need to raise the nose of the saddle a hair. Try raising the nose 1/8 inch, ride, adjust and repeat until you have proper balance and comfort (that is, you can ride no-hands comfortably without sliding, but the saddle nose is not putting pressure on the softer parts). I agree that I've never seen a properly adjusted saddle be perfectly level.
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Old 03-30-09, 11:07 AM
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Originally Posted by J.C. Koto
+1 Longfemur and reiffert

You probably need to raise the nose of the saddle a hair. Try raising the nose 1/8 inch, ride, adjust and repeat until you have proper balance and comfort (that is, you can ride no-hands comfortably without sliding, but the saddle nose is not putting pressure on the softer parts). I agree that I've never seen a properly adjusted saddle be perfectly level.
Yup.
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Old 03-30-09, 02:54 PM
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This happened to me on my brooks saddle and I just tilted it so the nose was up slightly. Feels better too. And I don't tend to slide off the back at all.
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