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Cane Creek Suspension Seat Post....

Old 03-30-09, 11:20 AM
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Cane Creek Suspension Seat Post....

....any comments pro/con on this seat post for long distance touring?
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Old 03-30-09, 02:28 PM
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I guess your talking about the "Thud Buster", I have the large one on my "rigid MTB converted to tourer", I still do unpaved tracks so it stayed on, takes out a lot of jarring.

When I used the bike as a mild MTB it was a brilliant bit of kit, don't get me wrong it will never compete with a suspended bike, but as a cheap way to save an aging back it's great.

It adds weight so I don't really see the need for one on a road touring bike unless the roads are rough or you have fragile back, they produce a smaller one especially for road use.

They are really well made, a quality product in my opinion.
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Old 03-30-09, 03:48 PM
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Originally Posted by Freewheeler
I guess your talking about the "Thud Buster", I have the large one on my "rigid MTB converted to tourer", I still do unpaved tracks so it stayed on, takes out a lot of jarring.

When I used the bike as a mild MTB it was a brilliant bit of kit, don't get me wrong it will never compete with a suspended bike, but as a cheap way to save an aging back it's great.

It adds weight so I don't really see the need for one on a road touring bike unless the roads are rough or you have fragile back, they produce a smaller one especially for road use.

They are really well made, a quality product in my opinion.

Thanks for the info- and yes, I was looking into the road version (to be used with a Surly LHT). I've seen a few pictures on the internet of loaded tourers equipped with that seat post. I am trying to weigh the options between using that seat post (with a Brooks Saddle) or just getting the Brooks Saddle with rear springs.

S
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Old 03-30-09, 10:26 PM
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I've had four suspension posts, two cheapies and two expensive ones. My ThudBuster is the best by far; the only one I felt was really giving me a usable suspension feeling. All my telescoping posts tended to react poorly based on their sliding action being close to perpendicular to the direction the bumps were coming from. That is: the spring isn't pointed toward the rear wheel. The ThudBuster on the other hand travels in an arc that's most affected by bumps from the rear wheel. It gave my touring / commuter bike a real smooth feeling ride and I don't notice the action beyond when I'm settling onto the saddle. I can't compare it to a springer saddle, but I always felt it was money well spent. I have the long travel model.
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Old 03-30-09, 10:53 PM
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Originally Posted by Disposable
I've had four suspension posts, two cheapies and two expensive ones. My ThudBuster is the best by far; the only one I felt was really giving me a usable suspension feeling. All my telescoping posts tended to react poorly based on their sliding action being close to perpendicular to the direction the bumps were coming from. That is: the spring isn't pointed toward the rear wheel. The ThudBuster on the other hand travels in an arc that's most affected by bumps from the rear wheel. It gave my touring / commuter bike a real smooth feeling ride and I don't notice the action beyond when I'm settling onto the saddle. I can't compare it to a springer saddle, but I always felt it was money well spent. I have the long travel model.


Thanks for the post- do you have the LT or the ST? I've read good arguments on both in regards for use on a "touring" bike. Trying to figure out which version may be better suited.

Edit-- I just noticed in your post you have the LT version. Anyone out there have the ST?

S
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Old 03-30-09, 11:01 PM
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once upon a time
when i was racing 24hr solo MTB races
the crew at Cane Creek gave me one at The Sea Otter
and told me if i didn't like it, i could return it.

i had done some races, typically 10th to 14th

next race, 24hrs at Northstar, I placed 4th.
sold!

i use a Thudbuster on My Pugsley, The Big Dummy and Hunter 29er.

beyond "all day comfort"
in the realm of Touring... its beyond Deluxe
and to top it off... its 100% MTB dirt worthy.
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Old 03-31-09, 04:44 AM
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Thanks....

For everyone's posts- I'm sold :-). Will be getting the ThudBuster for my "soon to arrive" LHT.

S
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Old 03-31-09, 07:56 AM
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Originally Posted by lifeguardsteve
For everyone's posts- I'm sold :-). Will be getting the ThudBuster for my "soon to arrive" LHT.

S
I hope you'll report back after living with it for awhile. I'm another LHT rider. I wouldn't mind adding something that would ease my sore bum after a few successive long days in the saddle.
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Old 03-31-09, 01:22 PM
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I have both Thusbusters. My Dahon folding bike came with the LT (Long Travel) version and I loved it. Really smoothed the ride out. And its so adjustable.

Last year when I purchased a Surly LHT, I change it to a Thudbuster St (Short Travel) to smooth out the roads up here in Vermont. I have a Brooks mounted to it and its very comfortable. I currently use the black elastomer, which is the firmest. It gives just enough. However, this year when I ride the GAP & C&O trails, I think I'll switch in the blue for a softer ride over all the bumps. The switch takes about 2 minutes! That's another great thing about the Thudbusters, you can adjust them to the ride you want.

Brian
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Old 03-31-09, 02:27 PM
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I have the Thudbuster LT (long travel) on my mtb/commuter bike (Kona Lava Dome). The suspension aspect does work quite well, though when I went back to it after riding a non-Thudbuster bike for a while, the movement did take some getting used to again. There are a few things that I didn't like so much:

1. The seat clamp uses two bolts for some reason, one of which is situated inside the mechanism that forms a parallelogram and houses the elastomers. This bolt can be a little fiddly to adjust - you cannot use a multitool to do it, since there isn't enough clearance. At least on my version, the only thing that will fit is one of the free-standing L-shaped allen keys (i.e. one with a short and a long end). There is another bolt behind the seatpost, which you have to loosen and tighten in tandem with the other one in order to tighten the clamp and adjust the seat angle. It does work, but I honestly find it an annoying system, since tightening either of the bolts also changes the seat angle. I much prefer something like the Salsa Shaft seat post which has two separate bolts that do completely different things - one simply clamps the saddle to the post, and the other is an eccentric cam that allows for adjustment of the seat angle. Also, the more regular seat posts generally don't have the clearance/access issues that the Thudbuster does. Finally, the allen key size on the Thudbuster seat adjustment bolts is quite small, and it seems much more prone to having the allen key slip out of the socket than the larger bolts used on other seat posts. I know that's a matter of skill and patience, but it can be a factor when the thing suddenly loosens on a cold, wet rainy ride (as has happened with me). Edit: One more thing - I found it very difficult, if not impossible as I recall, to find a replacement bolt for the Thudbuster seatpost clamp. Problem was that after slipping several times, the allen key socket got kind of rounded out, so I wanted to replace the bolt. It was a weird thread or length (can't remember now) and none of the local hardware or bike shops in St Louis had a match. Something to be aware of on the road - standard size replaceable parts is important when touring, otherwise it's important to have spares purchased beforehand.

2. The design of the seatpost makes it difficult to fit on smaller bikes which don't want so much seatpost showing, since you need clearance for the whole suspension mechanism. So if your seatpost setup doesn't show much post, you might find the Thudbuster sets your seat too high up at its minimum position. According to the Thudbuster site: "The suspension mechanism requires at least 144mm (LT)/98mm (ST) from the saddle rails to the bicycle frame". Most people will be ok, but it's something to be aware of.

3. The suspension mechanism also makes it a little more difficult to fit some saddle (seat) bags, which often have a strap that assumes a simple circular seat post - instead you have the parallelogram mechanism which can complicate the setup by forcing the bag a bit more up and back than it might otherwise be.

4. It also makes it a bit harder to mount some lights that could otherwise clamp onto the seatpost area that would otherwise be available just below the seat. For example, it may force you to mount the light lower than you'd otherwise like, which might take it below the level of any pack you might also have on top of the rear rack (I should add that saddle bags and lights are certainly not impossible to use in conjunction with the Thudbuster - but again, it's a potential issue that's good to be aware of).

While I do like the Thudbuster in theory, I'm finding myself veering away from it, and back towards something simpler like one of the sprung Brooks saddles, e.g. the B67. They do not offer as much suspension, but it's enough for me for general touring use. Also, simpler (less to go wrong, not that anything has with my Thudbuster, but any moving parts will eventually wear and need attention).

Neil

Last edited by NeilGunton; 03-31-09 at 04:01 PM.
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Old 03-31-09, 05:04 PM
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Originally Posted by BigBlueToe
I hope you'll report back after living with it for awhile. I'm another LHT rider. I wouldn't mind adding something that would ease my sore bum after a few successive long days in the saddle.

I'll be sure to do so.

S
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