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Pedals?

Old 12-12-09, 09:09 PM
  #1  
Bear cub
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Pedals?

I feel silly for asking this but what does everyone here use for pedals? Do you go with a clipless system or clips?
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Old 12-12-09, 09:11 PM
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ReelExterminato
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I use clipless pedals. Tried some Crank Bros Candies on my last trip (came with the bike), but I like the Shimano mountain bike ones better.
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Old 12-12-09, 09:28 PM
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There are quit a few using both (clips and clipless) and a lot using neither (flat pedals, no clips). I go with the flats, personally. Just like averything else, all those types of pedals have their own pros and cons, so read up to get some ideas and then try them out and see what feels good to you. The good part about pedals is that it`s very simple and relatively inexpensive to change or experiment.
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Old 12-12-09, 09:32 PM
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That's true. I still haven't used any clipless pedals. I think it's about time I invest in a pair and see what they're all about. Why do you prefer just a flat type of pedal?
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Old 12-12-09, 10:18 PM
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Clipless and super stiff mountain bike shoes make me happy.
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Old 12-12-09, 10:22 PM
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rodar y rodar
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Originally Posted by Bear cub View Post
Why do you prefer just a flat type of pedal?
Mine are pinned BMX pedals. In my view, the biggest advantage they offer over shoe and cleat systems is that is that they don`t require any special shoes. That`s helpful for touring and even more helpful for daily commuting/running around since I can ride to work in my tennies, leave at lunch time in my work boots, or wear hiking boots with heavy socks when it`s cold without any adjustments at all. A minor advantage is that my feet feel much better after several hours pushing against a big flat platrform compared to concentrating all that weight on a small spot. There are (expensive) carbon soled bike shoes and clip-in pedals with bigger platforms that supposedly mitigate the foot pain issue, but I don`t feel like shelling out for them. Flat pedals with or without toe clips and straps allow plenty of "float", which seems to be a knee savior to some, a non issue to others. The two downsides to flats over cleats are that flats tend to weigh a little more and that you can`t pull up on the pedals with them, although they do grip soft rubber soles very well and allow pulling back as well as pushing forward with little chance of slipping off the pedals.

Toe clips and straps share many of those andvantages and even allow a little bit of "up pull". The deal with them is that they`re a little bit of a hassle to get in and out of (mtb cleats are instant in and out and require no thought once you get the hang of it, road cleats supposedly not so simple, but I`ve never tried them), which gets to be a minor PITA if you have a lot of traffic stops. They`re also a little bit restrictive as far as the range of footwear you can use, but not too bad.

That`s why my commuter/tourer has flat pedals. On my road bike, I use quill pedals with toe clips and straps since it doesn`t get used much in traffic and they look cool My mtb goes back and forth between BMX pedals and click ins (bouncing off the pedals is an issue for rocky trails and the clickies are really the only way to solve that one). I also keep clickes on our tandem since I don`t want the extra hassle of stuffing my foot into a toe clip while trying to pilot a heavy, awkward bike and I REALLY don`t want my feet comming off the pedals if my stoker is still pedalling. So, horses for courses- even for one rider, different circumstances lead to different ideals.

Last edited by rodar y rodar; 12-12-09 at 10:35 PM.
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Old 12-12-09, 10:25 PM
  #7  
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I use Crank Brothers - they are good pedals, very easy to get in and out, and not too expensive. The mechanism is very simple, and will continue to work even if it rusts. The only disadvantage is that they have a bushing (instead of a bearing) on the inboard side, and that needs to be greased every 1000 miles or so. Its not difficult, just inconvenient (the pedals will remind you that they need to be greased by squeaking very loudly). That being said, the pedal is less important than the shoe. Stay away from road-specific systems because these don't have the cleat recessed, and you will find it difficult to walk around for any length of time. You might also damage the cleat.
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Old 12-12-09, 11:23 PM
  #8  
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I use Shimano MTB on all my bikes. Standardizing means that I can use the same shoes for all my bikes. My touring bike has the Shimano SM-PD22 platform/reflector on one side of the pedal, so I can use regular shoes on my touring bike as well.

As mentioned by others, if you go for cleats, get a system where the cleat is recessed into the sole of the shoe. I use Shimano sandals in most weather, but during the winter, I'll go with my Lake winter boots. For touring, it's always the sandals.
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Old 12-13-09, 12:06 AM
  #9  
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I use flats and Andrew clips in with the Shimano SPD system. He likes the stability it gives him. I never did adjust to the idea of clipping out at unexpected moments, like when a light turns red or someone dashes out in front of you. I also had some knee pain which, despite my attempts at adjustment, didn't go away until I stopped using the SPD system.

Here's an article we put together on cycling shoes and pedals, showing you the main options of clips, cages and straps.

https://travellingtwo.com/resources/cycling-shoes
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Old 12-13-09, 12:07 AM
  #10  
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Toe clips and straps.
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Old 12-13-09, 12:37 AM
  #11  
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Pinned BMX pedals,for all the same reasons as Rodar y Rodar.
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Old 12-13-09, 12:53 AM
  #12  
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I have three types of pedals, shimano mtb spd, look and old nouvo record with toe clips. I prefer the mtb spd's so I can walk without looking like a duck.
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Old 12-13-09, 01:19 AM
  #13  
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Oh wow that so much input. I was thinking about going with a flat pedal w/ clips but ive heard how clipless system is so much more effective. Basically what is more comfortable for the long haul?
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Old 12-13-09, 02:18 AM
  #14  
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Give the clickies a try, then. For under a hundred US you can find out for yourself and chances are you`ll be able to use them for something even if you don`t want them all the time. Two minutes, a little grease or anti sieze, and one wrench is all it takes to swap pedals.
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Old 12-13-09, 11:31 AM
  #15  
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MTB- Clipless/SPD
Commuting/city - Flat / no attachments
Touring/racing - Clips and straps
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Old 12-13-09, 11:58 AM
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I run Shimano M520's. Never paid more than $40 for them. I really like them for touring but have to say that the shoe is really important with them at least for me.

With a soft sole they make my feet suffer. I ride with Sidi dominators and I'm golden. Stiff sole is pretty important for me at least.
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Old 12-13-09, 12:16 PM
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Shimano M324 work great , Shimano A530 are too narrow for non-spd shoes.
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Old 12-13-09, 12:24 PM
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Clipless with Crank Bros Candies and Cheap Shimano MTN bike shoes. I'd like to upgrade the shoes to something a little nicer at somepoint.
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Old 12-13-09, 01:12 PM
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I use flat BMX pedals with pins for commuting this time of year so I can wear my waterproof shoes or boots if I want.

I sometimes used crank bros. pedals with mtn shoes and like them as well.

Whatever you prefer!
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Old 12-13-09, 08:03 PM
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I have two sets of nashbar pedals, (trek hybrid and Rivendell tourer) SPD on one side, flat on the other. For longer rides when I know I will not be off the bike walking around, SPD shoes, around town, shopping, etc., sneakers, boots, whatever on the flat side.
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Old 12-13-09, 10:18 PM
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Anyone use MKS Touring or Touring Lite peddles? Looking at getting one of these with some Power Grips.
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Old 12-14-09, 10:32 AM
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Love the MKS Touring, like the bike I had when I was a kid. No special shoes, just get on and ride, then you can actually walk normally when you hop off.
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Old 12-14-09, 11:13 AM
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Originally Posted by kaliayev View Post
Anyone use MKS Touring or Touring Lite peddles? Looking at getting one of these with some Power Grips.
I have been using the Power Grips for about three months now and why I went with them instead of the standard toe clip and strap is I wear a size US 14 shoe and did not think my foot would sit in the right place on the pedal with such a long shoe. I like the Power Grip, it is easy to get in and out of and when having to stop at traffic lights a simple twist of the foot and the strap is loose. At first I could not get my foot into the strap without looking down, but that is OK because you can just put your foot right on top of the strap and pedal until clear the the intersection. Now I can just hit the edge of the pedal with my toe and it flips right over and since the strap is loose my foot goes right in. Simply straightening your foot tightens the strap back up. Works great for short rides to the food store and around town. I am going to try a set of Shimano PD-535 (given to me for free) pedals for my touring bike I am building. I use the Power Grips on my mountain bike equiped with street tires.
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Old 12-14-09, 03:02 PM
  #24  
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I use SPD pedals, and mountain bike shoes (Shimano M075). The shoes are very comfortable and easy to walk in. In fact one 10 day tour I forgot to pack my non-bike shoes so was wearing the bike shoes for camping and everything - and while I did occasionally wish I was not wearing bike shoes (ie. climbing over rocks on the beach), I wasn't unhappy enough to buy shoes on the trip either. I like double-sided pedals for touring as its nice to not have the pedal be the wrong-way around. The clips are really easy to get out of once you are used to them, and you can adjust the tension so they are even easier when you are first starting out. Whatever people have said about clipless being hard to get out of suddenly - its NOT an issue, and I think these comments have been from people that either have never tried or gave up very quickly during the learning period. In addition to the efficiency you have climbing hills (since you can also pull up) it just feels more comfortable to be "attached" to the bike when you are riding it all day long.
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Old 12-14-09, 03:07 PM
  #25  
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Originally Posted by crazybikerchick View Post
Whatever people have said about clipless being hard to get out of suddenly - its NOT an issue,
It will only be an issue ONCE.

And the issue is not that its hard to unclip, it is that you forgot to unclip until it is way too late.

Hello road!!
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