Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Touring
Reload this Page >

All about tents. Tell us what you use and help me pick a new one.

Notices
Touring Have a dream to ride a bike across your state, across the country, or around the world? Self-contained or fully supported? Trade ideas, adventures, and more in our bicycle touring forum.

All about tents. Tell us what you use and help me pick a new one.

Old 04-15-10, 11:47 PM
  #1  
a1rabbit
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Vancouver, Canada
Posts: 124
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
All about tents. Tell us what you use and help me pick a new one.

I'm slowly starting to get ready for not only touring, but getting my 5 year old son out camping as a father/son thing.

If you don't want to read this entire post I'd still like you to tell me what tent you use. how much it weighs and how many it sleeps, also it's pros and cons. Pictures inside and out are welcome!

Anyhow, sense I seem to be long-winded...

We have an older dome tent, it's been good for summer and spring trips but is aging. I'll still use our current dome for car camping, as I can easily string a huge tarp up over it to keep the entire site dry for my son if needed, but I'd like give it a sibling that will be good for touring.

It seems most tents I'm interested in are two person, I like the option of easily taking a friend who is not as well prepared for camping, the tent I like the most is around 3.5kg or 7.7lbs, the rest are a lot to a little lighter.

I'm looking for fast setup, I really don't want to be securing 12 guy-lines every night if I can help it. I'd also like one that will keep dry if I get rained out for a day or two and just want to hang out for a couple days without a tarp. Price range is around $250. (Canadian)

I'm not insistent on a two person. I've been checking out single person tents too, in the event that I get a single person and someone else wants to come with me I could always take the old dome and split the load.


A couple tents I'm looking at are as follows. (All are three season, possibly four depending on the user)

Single Person.


MSR Hubba Tent
$280
1.5kg or 3.3lbs
I know the brand name, looks like what I need. Most expensive on the list.

Big Agnes Seedhouse 1 SL
$255
1.3kg or 2.9lbs
Nice and light. Suffers from lots of guy-lines and possible leaks, I saw a workaround in reviews somewhere for the leak. Seems I should just get the MSR for a couple extra bucks.


Two person I like that I can get both of these tents in a brown "driftwood" color for stealth camping. It's turning into a selling point over the MSR single person.

MEC Wanderer 2
$217
3.5kg or 7.7lbs
I really like this tent, I love domes for their sturdiness and easy setup. I've wanted this tent for about 12 years (Unless I'm confused with an older tent they had) and have just never needed it. There is also an option to get the tent in all mesh. Two doors and vestibules, lots of great reviews, etc. Seems really heavy if I tour alone, but great for two people which will happen just as often as solo trips.

MEC Tarn 2
$182
2.8kg or 6.6lbs
Nothing much to say about it.


So those are what I'm looking at now. I'd love to get my tent from MEC, or at least somewhere in Canada. Shipping to Canada is no fun unless the savings is fairly high or if the product is made in America (no duty then).

I really love that Wanderer, but the MSR seems like a better fit.

If I tour with a friend who wants to come, splitting the load of the heavier tent would be worth it, especially if we get rained on which is very, very likely on the west coast of Canada.

On the other hand, I've always liked having my own tent.

So what tents do you use? Lets see some pics of them in use, and how heavy they are, how they are in rain, etc.

Thanks!
a1rabbit is offline  
Old 04-16-10, 12:30 AM
  #2  
int19
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 250
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I have a Big Agnes Seedhouse SL3, its about 3 years old. Its quick to set up even in pitch black, I never use the guy lines unless its very windy and rainy. Most of the time I only stake down the front two points of the rainfly to expand the gear storage area. It sleeps two people comfortably.
int19 is offline  
Old 04-16-10, 12:41 AM
  #3  
sehsuan
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Singapore
Posts: 131
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
this is my to-be-edited review of the Big Agnes Slide Mountain SL3:
https://www.backpackgeartest.org/revi...ountain%20SL3/

you won't see it for too long, cos i'm behind time to get it edited... LOL
sehsuan is offline  
Old 04-16-10, 01:20 AM
  #4  
Juha
Formerly Known as Newbie
 
Juha's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Helsinki, Finland
Posts: 6,250
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 3 Posts
I have two shelters: an old double wall freestanding dome tent, and a Hennessy Hammock. The tent sleeps 3 comfortably, so with the two of us there's more than enough space to bring whatever gear you want inside. I use the tent on solo tours too, and it's great when the weather is cold. Hammock on the other hand is useful for solo trips where I expect to have warm weather and for some reason want to pack really light / small. One good thing about hammock is, it packs in pretty much any shape needed as there are no poles. But it's really just a solo shelter for sleeping. I would not like to spend time in it e.g. reading through a spell of bad weather or such.

Personally I would not consider a single person tent even for solo tours. I usually carry the tent on bike or in kayak, so small weight penalty is not an issue for me. I've used to the extra space and I like it. YMMV, of course. I would aim for a 2-person or larger double wall tent, and make sure it can be set up and taken down with the rainfly on. My current one requires inner tent be set up first, before adding the rainfly. If it rains heavily during set up or packing, the inner tent will get wet. On longer tours with consistent bad weather that can become a problem pretty quickly.

--J
__________________
To err is human. To moo is bovine.

Who is this General Failure anyway, and why is he reading my drive?


Become a Registered Member in Bike Forums
Community guidelines
Juha is offline  
Old 04-16-10, 01:43 AM
  #5  
takeonafrica
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 56
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I would definitely go for a 2-person tent, even if you're touring alone... I put all my panniers in the tent with me (for security) and there's plenty of space still.

I use the MSR hubba hubba...

pros - lightweight, stands without ropes or pegs, can be put up with inner only if hot and dry, quick to put up and take down, 2 side entrances are great if there are two people.
cons - because it's lightweight the material will not be so hardwearing, expensive (but I got mine 2nd hand on ebay), have to put it up inner first (only a consideration if expecting lots of rain).

I've been using this for 9months now and am really happy with it - it's ideal for me in Africa so far... only had a couple of days of rain though so not sure how it will stand up with long downpours but I've stayed dry when it has rained.

The inner now has a couple of small holes in it where I've caught it on thorny bushes - should be more careful. And the zip on one side of the inner is stuck - think this is from all the dust and dirt so will try soaking it in water at some point...

Overall I'm very happy with this - the style and weight are perfect. But it may not be hard-wearing enough for some - but if you look after it, it should be fine.
takeonafrica is offline  
Old 04-16-10, 02:36 AM
  #6  
Erick L
Lentement mais sûrement
 
Erick L's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Montréal
Posts: 2,253
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 78 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 1 Post
I still use a 12yo Sierra Design Clip Flashlight. This tent has legendary status and sells at a decent price. The newer models are supposed to be lighter and offer more elbow room. It is not freestanding and I wouldn't use it for two people on a regular basis.

Set-up is easy:
1- stake the 4 corners
2- insert poles in ends and clip the tenbt body to the poles
3- clip rain fly to body and 2 stakes for the vestibule.

I'Ve used it in strong wind on many occasion and it wouldn't bulge. I've seen a guy who climbed Denali with one. He sewed fabric over the mesh.




Last edited by Erick L; 04-16-10 at 02:42 AM.
Erick L is offline  
Old 04-16-10, 02:59 AM
  #7  
kutipper
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Lawrence, KS
Posts: 38

Bikes: Felt F85 and Giant Boulder SE

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I have a Mountain Hardwear Lightpath 2. it is a 3 season tent that fits two people. Pros is that it is very affordable, light, easy two pole set up, and have never had any problems with water. Cons would be that there is not a whole lot of room to move around in, and i would also look for different stakes than using the one that they give you.
kutipper is offline  
Old 04-16-10, 03:32 AM
  #8  
wahoonc
Membership Not Required
 
wahoonc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: On the road-USA
Posts: 16,855

Bikes: Giant Excursion, Raleigh Sports, Raleigh R.S.W. Compact, Motobecane? and about 20 more! OMG

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 68 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 9 Times in 8 Posts
I have a couple of tents, but my old faithful is a 4 man Eureka Timberline I bought it right out of high school for a month long camping trip. It has about reached the end of it's useful life span some 30+ years later. It was used for the original trip, then used a couple of weekends a month for the next 15 years and off and on after that.

They do make a 2 man version of the tent, my DD has one and loves it. We bought it for her when she graduated from high school.

To me the best feature of the Timberline is the interior volume it has low sidewalls that help make the tent a bit larger, the squared off foot print helps too. Price is usually under $200 for the 4 man and quite often can be found on sale at Campmor.

Aaron
__________________
Webshots is bailing out, if you find any of my posts with corrupt picture files and want to see them corrected please let me know. :(

ISO: A late 1980's Giant Iguana MTB frameset (or complete bike) 23" Red with yellow graphics.

"Cycling should be a way of life, not a hobby.
RIDE, YOU FOOL, RIDE!"
_Nicodemus

"Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
Aluminum: barely a hundred
Which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?"
_krazygluon
wahoonc is offline  
Old 04-16-10, 04:03 AM
  #9  
markf
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Wheat Ridge, CO
Posts: 1,076

Bikes: '93 Bridgestone MB-3, '88 Marinoni road bike, '00 Marinoni Piuma, '01 Riv A/R

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
The two man timberline used to be everybody's first tent- cheap, sturdy and simple. Nice to know that they're still around, there's a lot to be said for cheap, sturdy and simple.

Here's my tent: https://www.blackdiamondequipment.com...ers/mega-light

Lightweight, packs small, sets up quickly. It has enough headroom in the middle for one or two people to sit upright, and I cook in mine on a regular basis. Sometimes I bring the floor, sometimes I just have a sheet of plastic for my side of the tent. Sometimes I pitch it by hanging it from a tree

The two drawbacks are, it's not free standing and you need a decent patch of level ground to pitch it. I would not consider it a 4 person tent, but it's a great one or two person tent.
markf is offline  
Old 04-16-10, 05:09 AM
  #10  
zoltani
sniffin' glue
 
zoltani's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Seattle
Posts: 3,182

Bikes: Surly crosscheck ssfg, Custom vintage french racing bike, Bruce Gordon Rock & Road

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I use a Big Agnes Emerald Mountain SL2, and I love the thing. Keeps me dry, has two vestibules for gear storage, two doors, and not too many guy lines. Well, the guy lines help to sturdy the tent in the wind. We had some crazy mistral wind a couple of weekends ago and the tent barely moved. I hate waking up to a tent flapping around in the wind. I got it for around your price range on ebay, new.

If I had to buy another tent today I would buy this one again, or maybe consider another tent in the BA lineup. If I have one complaint it is this, if it rain a lot you get a puddle on the head side of the tent and the drip, drip, drip can splash up onto the mesh. It's not that big a deal, but maybe it is why they designed the Copper Spur tent with tent fabric higher up the tent.
zoltani is offline  
Old 04-16-10, 05:24 AM
  #11  
staehpj1 
Senior Member
 
staehpj1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Posts: 10,215
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 592 Post(s)
Liked 193 Times in 155 Posts
I really like my MSR Fling, but it has been discontinued. I bought it for about half price when they were closing out the model.

My recommendation is to get one of the lightest 2 man tents if you only want to buy one tent. In your position I'd probably get an MSR Hubba Hubba. Think long and hard before committing to carrying anything as heavy as either of the MEC tents you mentioned. I carried a 9+ pound tent on the Trans America (for three of us to share) and I cussed it's weight everyday. A pound here and a pound there really make a big difference.

I am not inclined to bring much gear inside and prefer to just leave whatever I don't actually need in the tent on the bike and in the panniers.
__________________
Check out my profile, articles, and trip journals at:
https://www.crazyguyonabike.com/staehpj1
staehpj1 is offline  
Old 04-16-10, 05:44 AM
  #12  
Bikearound
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 124
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I have a North Face Oval 25 for cold weather camping and an Early Winters Gore Tex bivy for lightweight touring and camping. While the bivy is old, it was my only shelter for years and I first used it on my Seattle to Madison Wi. trip in 1979. The funny thing is that it is still water resistant as any tent. As far as the Oval 25 tent, it's big and heavy but strong and weather tight and can stand up in a blow.
Bikearound is offline  
Old 04-16-10, 06:03 AM
  #13  
Juha
Formerly Known as Newbie
 
Juha's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Helsinki, Finland
Posts: 6,250
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 3 Posts
Forgot one thing about guy lines: they're not there just to make sure the tent stays put in wind. In a double wall tent guy lines pull the outer tent walls away from the inner tent walls. Having a gap between the two walls is important for proper ventilation.
__________________
To err is human. To moo is bovine.

Who is this General Failure anyway, and why is he reading my drive?


Become a Registered Member in Bike Forums
Community guidelines
Juha is offline  
Old 04-16-10, 06:08 AM
  #14  
chrisch
Senior Member
 
chrisch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Rotkreuz, Switzerland
Posts: 248

Bikes: Trek 520, Gary Fisher Big Sur

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by takeonafrica View Post
I would definitely go for a 2-person tent, even if you're touring alone... I put all my panniers in the tent with me (for security) and there's plenty of space still.

I use the MSR hubba hubba...

pros - lightweight, stands without ropes or pegs, can be put up with inner only if hot and dry, quick to put up and take down, 2 side entrances are great if there are two people.
cons - because it's lightweight the material will not be so hardwearing, expensive (but I got mine 2nd hand on ebay), have to put it up inner first (only a consideration if expecting lots of rain).
+1

I wrote a two-line review of the Hubba Hubba while touring northern Europe last summer. I highly recommend it.
chrisch is offline  
Old 04-16-10, 06:32 AM
  #15  
Gordon P
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Mentioned: Post(s)
Tagged: Thread(s)
Quoted: Post(s)
I have the MSR Hubba and it functions well as a light weight solo tent. What I do not like about it is the colour, which is terrible for stealth camping and that it is not very comfortable for long periods of time such as getting caught in the rain for a day. Also the guy lines should be used to keep the rain out, not a big deal as there are only a few of them. I would agree with the recommendation to go with a 2 person tent.

Gordon
 
Old 04-16-10, 08:17 AM
  #16  
Pscyclepath
LCI #1853
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Scott. Arkansas
Posts: 663

Bikes: Trek Madone 5.2, Fisher Caliber 29er, Orbea Onix

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by a1rabbit View Post
Single Person.[/B]

MSR Hubba Tent
$280
1.5kg or 3.3lbs
I know the brand name, looks like what I need. Most expensive on the list.

Big Agnes Seedhouse 1 SL
$255
1.3kg or 2.9lbs
Nice and light. Suffers from lots of guy-lines and possible leaks, I saw a workaround in reviews somewhere for the leak. Seems I should just get the MSR for a couple extra bucks.
I have the Seedhouse SL1, and have used it for a little over a year now. I really like how compact and portable it is, as well as the ease of setup and takedown. It's a light, flat green, so it fits in well when you need to be discrete in your campsite selection.

I typically don't use the guy lines, but simply tack it down at four corners with some of the small stakes provided with it, and have not had any trouble with wind, leaks, etc. Having gone suddenly from sleeping under the stars or using a simple fly, having the floored inner (and bugproof) tent has been very nice ;-)

It is pretty small inside, though... definitely a one-person tent if that person is adult and of average size. Most of my "tours" to date have been solo overnighters, and I tend to pack light, so that hasn't been a big problem. I bought one of the Seedhouse SL2 2-person tents late last fall and have used it twice, it's a bit roomier and lets me bring the panniers and stuff inside... the vestibule for both the Seedhouse tents is rather small. The SL2 packs about half again larger than the SL1, but either are pretty simple to pack away...
Pscyclepath is offline  
Old 04-16-10, 08:33 AM
  #17  
rockdog
Senior Member
 
rockdog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Kalamazoo, MI USA
Posts: 102

Bikes: Co-Motion Americano - LBS Build, 90something Fuji Sunfire hybrid

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Since we're on the subject of tents, has anyone used the Sierra Designs Light Year 1 tent and if so what are your thoughts on it? I really like our old SD Comet but it's a 3 person tent and a bit much to carry around for 1 person. I'm thinking about using my REI member discount on a new tent and was looking at the SD Light Year or the Clip Flashlight that Erick mentioned earlier in this thread. Yeah, I know they're not free standing.
rockdog is offline  
Old 04-16-10, 09:35 AM
  #18  
sunset1123
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Missoula, MT
Posts: 130

Bikes: Giant TCX 1 touring conversion

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I also use a Black Diamond Megamid. They make a lightweight version as well (as markf pointed out). The most versatile tent I've ever used, with the exception of the Mountain Hardwear Kiva. The Kiva is a pentagonal shape, absolutely huge (think basecamp for mountaineering in a group of 4 with everyone's gear inside with room to spare)... unfortunately, the bright orange color was not good for hiding in the trees. The Megamid is smaller, but easier to hide, can be hung from a tree (can be pitched over rocks), and can be made tall enough to stand up in, or sucked down to a very low profile in bad weather. Definitely consider this one.

If you are really into a tent with a floor, GoLite makes a floor for the megamid that is better than the BD version.

Also, back to your list, you can't go wrong with the MSR. They make truly excellent products. I have logged countless days on backcountry expeditions, mountaineering, extended camping, and cycle touring... when your life has to depend on your gear, here's my short list: Mountain Hardwear, Black Diamond, MSR.

(and no, I don't work for or represent any of these companies, just had my a$$ saved by their gear several times)
sunset1123 is offline  
Old 04-16-10, 10:02 AM
  #19  
browell
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Palmer, AK
Posts: 25
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
My favorite tent is the black diamond mega light. Lots of head room, good ventalation, and very light weight. Fly and bug screen are sold seperately. Single pole, tee pee style. It's a great tent. I've used it in all four seasons in Alaska without any problems, except the time I decided not to bring the bug sceen on a July hiking trip. The mosquitos were so fierce and I didn't get any sleep.
https://www.amazon.com/Black-Diamond-.../dp/B000R2BRWQ
https://www.amazon.com/Black-Diamond-.../dp/B0007SLEZA
browell is offline  
Old 04-16-10, 10:30 AM
  #20  
Pokey Shabadoo
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 15
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I would also suggest the MSR Hubba Hubba. All of what TakeonAfrica says plus it has two entrances and vestibules on either side, set up and tear down is quick and painless. I'm 6'2", 230 lbs and shared it with another person who was 5'10" 170lbs for 10 days. It was crowded, but there was enough space for both of us head to toe to sleep well.

We had 4 days of very heavy BC coast rain and stayed completely dry the entire time. The vestibules had enough room for two large panniers, a pair of shoes, a 6 pack of wobbly pop, and space to crawl in and out on both sides. The big plus was the weight and the fact it fit very nicely on the top of my rear rack.
Pokey Shabadoo is offline  
Old 04-16-10, 11:51 AM
  #21  
Lanterne Rogue
Senior Member
 
Lanterne Rogue's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 210
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 18 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
+1 on Black Diamond Mega Light. You can fit four people (or two people and bikes) for less than 3 pounds. It's 57 inches high, and bombproof in the wind. If bugs are a problem, you can Velco on a 15-inch strip of mosquito netting around the tent bottom, or just use some netting around your head in the sleeping bag. Depending on where I'm camping, sometimes I use Tyvek scavenged from a construction site as a groundcloth for my sleeping pad. On sale now at Black Diamond for $208.

Or if you like a more traditional double-walled tent, I really the REI Half Dome 2, though I think they redesigned it lately.
Lanterne Rogue is offline  
Old 04-16-10, 12:29 PM
  #22  
truman
It's true, man.
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: North Texas
Posts: 2,726

Bikes: Cannondale T1000, Inbred SS 29er, Supercaliber 29er, Crescent Mark XX, Burley Rumba Tandem

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I sleep in an REI Quarter Dome SL 2man tent. At 6' 1" and 200 lbs I would not want to share it with another human for any extended time, but for one man, it's exactly what I wanted.

I have room for my crap + enough to easily sit up, change clothes, move around without getting condensation on me, or spend a rainy day without going bonkers. It has side doors which keeps me from having to crawl over anyone to get out for a midnight whiz. And it weighs under 4 lbs.

My previous tent which I still have, is a Wentzel Starlight 1.5 man. It's perfectly serviceable, single walled, 3 lbs and usable by 2 people as long as they are intimate or want to become so. One must belly-crawl in and out however.

I love my 1/4 Dome.
truman is offline  
Old 04-16-10, 01:03 PM
  #23  
cyclist2000
Senior Member
 
cyclist2000's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Up
Posts: 4,431

Bikes: Masi, Giant TCR, Eisentraut (retired), Jamis Aurora Elite, Zullo, Cannondale, 84 Stumpjumper, Waterford, Tern D8, Bianchi, Gunner Roadie, Serotta, and looking for a Brompton M6R

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 260 Post(s)
Liked 1,463 Times in 423 Posts
I have two tents a Mountain Hardwear Lightpath 3, weights little more than 5 lbs, is not freestanding and uses a lot of stakes, easy to put up and I use it for one person and my gear, got it last year and haven't used it yet. My other tent is a kelty Pagoda 4 this I use for family or supported touring, it weighs a lot and has plenty of room good ventilation, its been a very good tent for me. My oldest tent is a Eureka Timberline, this is a boy scout a-frame style tent, it worked well enough for years but has poor ventilation and the pole for the rain fly is fiberglass which shredded on me during one trip. I wrapped the splintered pole with electrical tape and was able to use it the reminder of the trip, heavy for loaded touring, poor ventilation other than that it worked well. Since that Eureka I make sure that my tent have all aluminum poles.
cyclist2000 is offline  
Old 04-16-10, 01:43 PM
  #24  
blaise_f
Senior Member
 
blaise_f's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Phoenix
Posts: 627

Bikes: Surly Trucker

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Tents are much like sleeping bags - the more you spend, the likelihood of getting lighter/smaller pack size increases. If you don't need a free-standing, a Tarp-tent or the like are king, IMO, for both space and weight (and cost). I personally needed a free-standing tent, and had no intention of keeping much of my gear in the tent (bear country = most needs to be hanging anyway), so I went with Sierra Designs' Lightning XT 1. Just under 3 pounds, packs up *tiny* and comes with some strong weatherproofing. I recently pitched it in a 4 day downpour and slept in it nightly - everything kept dry and dandy. It's smaller inside than most, but it's perfect if you just need a solo tent and don't need 4 panniers inside.
blaise_f is offline  
Old 04-16-10, 03:00 PM
  #25  
BigBlueToe
Senior Member
 
BigBlueToe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Central Coast, CA
Posts: 3,392

Bikes: Surly LHT, Specialized Rockhopper, Nashbar Touring (old), Specialized Stumpjumper (older), Nishiki Tourer (model unknown)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by Erick L View Post
I still use a 12yo Sierra Design Clip Flashlight. This tent has legendary status and sells at a decent price. The newer models are supposed to be lighter and offer more elbow room. It is not freestanding and I wouldn't use it for two people on a regular basis.

Set-up is easy:
1- stake the 4 corners
2- insert poles in ends and clip the tenbt body to the poles
3- clip rain fly to body and 2 stakes for the vestibule.

I'Ve used it in strong wind on many occasion and it wouldn't bulge. I've seen a guy who climbed Denali with one. He sewed fabric over the mesh.



I have a garage full of tents for different uses. After touring with a heavy backpacking tent I bought a Clip Flashlight, similar to the one described here. It's a great design for one person, but I wouldn't want to squeeze two in it. It's very light, which was the main reason I bought it.

However, I'm tall (6'4") and it was a bit too confining. I searched around and tried a Backcountry 1 from Eureka. It was a nice design, but too narrow. I like to read on my side, and it's so narrow I couldn't stretch my arm out. My book was 4 inches away from my face, and I'm far-sighted!

Then I found the Microlight 2 from L. L. Bean. The design is similar to the Clip Flashlight, except a bit bigger in all dimensions. It seems to be the perfect tent for me! It's even a bit better than the Clip Flashlight for summer touring because the tent walls are completely made of bug screen. Have you ever had to hide out in your tent because of mosquitoes? If so, you know that if the sun's out your tent will be like a sauna, and it's very unpleasant. This was the case in my Clip Flashlight because the tent walls were nylon. With the Microlight I can hide in my tent (without the rain fly) and it's like being in a screen shelter. On nights with no rain in the forecast I often leave the rain fly off all night and I can look up at the stars, protected from bugs. And it doesn't seem much heavier than my Clip Flashlight - probably because of the bug screen/vs. fabric walls, and the fact that much of it is made of that silicon-nylon fabric that is so light.

I recommend going one number higher than the tent manufacturer's recommendation. I mean, if you're going to be alone, go for a 2-person. If you're with someone else, go for a 3-person. You'll have someone else to share the weight, so you'll probably be riding with less of a load than if you're by yourself.

I also strongly recommend a tent with a rain fly that goes all the way to the ground. Getting wet inside a tent is miserable anytime, but on a bike tour you feel like you're more exposed. My son had a Coleman tent where the rain fly went halfway down, then the tent walls were supposed to be waterproof the rest of the way. It worked in a light shower, but we got dumped on once and it leaked. His sleeping bag got soaked and he was miserable!
BigBlueToe is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.