Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Touring
Reload this Page >

Raleigh Roadster for touring and city use?

Notices
Touring Have a dream to ride a bike across your state, across the country, or around the world? Self-contained or fully supported? Trade ideas, adventures, and more in our bicycle touring forum.

Raleigh Roadster for touring and city use?

Old 05-23-10, 08:46 AM
  #1  
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Colombia
Posts: 2

Bikes: looking...

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Raleigh Roadster for touring and city use?

Hi!

I've looked at a number of websites and some posts on this forum, but this is my first post here, so if you can direct me to someplace my questions are already answered, I'd really appreciate it.

This summer, my husband and I are moving to Gainesville, Florida, for a year, and planning to spend about 12 days in the first few weeks there getting to know the state by bike-camping from Gainesville to Tampa and back (about 140 miles each way, divided up into about 4-5 days down, 2-3 days there, 4-5 days back with one or two stops where we'll stay 2 nights).

Neither of us has really been on a bike for more than a few hours for at least a decade.

First, are we crazy?

Second, we're on a budget and can't spend more than $500 for each of our bikes. After reading lots of bike reviews and opinions of some of you on components to look for in a good touring bike, I *think* the Raleigh Roadster (both women's and men's versions) might be a good pick.

I like them for the following:

- steel frame (for a smoother ride on long trips, and sturdiness to carry loads, as far as I've gathered)
- 8-speeds (other steel-framed bikes in our price range seem to be mostly single-speed or 3-speed; not that we'll need to change gears that often in Florida, but we don't know where we'll end up later on and would like a little more flexibility in terms of hill capabilities, just in case)
- comes with fenders
- fairly upright riding position
- 700c wheels (seems to be what's recommended for road touring - but are they also ok for some light dirt trails?)
- nice looks
- price (and right now they're on sale for $419 at REI)

As far as I can tell, it seems to me the closest we can get to a Raleigh Sojourn or Trek 520 or other recommended "touring" bike which we would love to be able to afford, is the Raleigh Roadster.

Other options we've looked at, which might work, are: Giant Sedona ST, Kona Worldbike, Torker Graduate and Schwinn Jenny (for me - although I'm not a big fan of the yellow color). Of course we don't have to have matching bikes!

After this bike camping tour, we'll use the bikes for daily errands, riding to school/work and hopefully weekend getaways to some state parks within about 40 miles from Gainesville. Then, hopefully we'll be able to take the bikes wherever we end up after that and put them to similar use there.

We are currently in Colombia and, while there are some good bike shops here, most cyclists here race or ride long distances over the Andes mountains (not uses we need in our bikes), so we may not be able to find these brands/models to try out beforehand, and since we're planning to start our bike trip fairly soon after we arrive to Florida, we won't have a lot of time to be trying out bikes in order to buy them from a local bike store there, so we're hoping to be able to make a decision and purchase the bikes online, beforehand, to have them waiting for us when we arrive and spend the few days before heading out getting them aligned, breaking them in and getting them geared up with bottle holders, racks, etc.

Sorry this post is so long!! I really hope you can help with opinions, encouragement, etc.!

Attached Images
File Type: jpg
RaleighRoadsterWO.jpg (2.9 KB, 78 views)
File Type: jpg
RaleighRoadsterME.jpg (2.4 KB, 78 views)

Last edited by chiclista; 05-23-10 at 08:52 AM. Reason: adding photos
chiclista is offline  
Old 05-23-10, 09:33 AM
  #2  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 5,205
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 140 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 81 Times in 64 Posts
you're not at all crazy. Frame geometry and tire size has more to do with "comfort" than frame material. Make sure you understand where the proper position for the seat height should be. As you ride more experiment with saddle tilt, fore aft adjustment (if possible) and handlebar position. Those traditional handlebars are a lot more natural for hand position than straight bars IMHO. You might consider having some bar extensions added on to the forward bend on your bars for more riding positions. The shop should be able to pull that together. I rode a 38lb 5spd Schwinn Collegiate all over Los Angeles that wasn't much different than that, of a prehistoric construction without aluminum parts.
LeeG is offline  
Old 05-23-10, 01:50 PM
  #3  
Membership Not Required
 
wahoonc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: On the road-USA
Posts: 16,855

Bikes: Giant Excursion, Raleigh Sports, Raleigh R.S.W. Compact, Motobecane? and about 20 more! OMG

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 70 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 16 Times in 15 Posts
You can tour on anything I routinely ride 40+ miles on a Raleigh Twenty and haul my stuff with me for a minimal camping. If the bike fits, is comfortable, and has a way to carry your things you will be fine as long as you don't try to push it. FWIW my first tour was ~20 miles on a Western Flyer single speed coaster brake bike, everything was packed in the front basket! If you really want to see how to tour simply read this tour story. To me a tour is less about the equipment and more about the attitude of the rider(s).

Aaron
__________________
Webshots is bailing out, if you find any of my posts with corrupt picture files and want to see them corrected please let me know. :(

ISO: A late 1980's Giant Iguana MTB frameset (or complete bike) 23" Red with yellow graphics.

"Cycling should be a way of life, not a hobby.
RIDE, YOU FOOL, RIDE!"
_Nicodemus

"Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
Aluminum: barely a hundred
Which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?"
_krazygluon

Last edited by wahoonc; 05-24-10 at 07:48 PM.
wahoonc is offline  
Old 05-24-10, 05:11 PM
  #4  
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Colombia
Posts: 2

Bikes: looking...

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanks for the encouragement.

I haven't had the chance to read the whole tour story you sent, Aaron, but I read the first couple of pages. Love the old pictures and imagining life in those times! Thanks for the link!

Any comments from you two or others as to the quality of the Raleigh Roadster for touring in comparison to other bikes in the same price range, and its capability of adding racks, panniers and trailers (we're thinking of going with a back pannier or two on my bike and a BOB or other trailer on the back of my husband's bike) would be really helpful!!
chiclista is offline  
Old 05-24-10, 07:47 PM
  #5  
Membership Not Required
 
wahoonc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: On the road-USA
Posts: 16,855

Bikes: Giant Excursion, Raleigh Sports, Raleigh R.S.W. Compact, Motobecane? and about 20 more! OMG

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 70 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 16 Times in 15 Posts
Originally Posted by chiclista
Thanks for the encouragement.

I haven't had the chance to read the whole tour story you sent, Aaron, but I read the first couple of pages. Love the old pictures and imagining life in those times! Thanks for the link!

Any comments from you two or others as to the quality of the Raleigh Roadster for touring in comparison to other bikes in the same price range, and its capability of adding racks, panniers and trailers (we're thinking of going with a back pannier or two on my bike and a BOB or other trailer on the back of my husband's bike) would be really helpful!!
I have not seen a Raleigh Roadster up close and personal...yet. If I get the chance I will look at one for you. From the pictures it appears to have the necessary mounting points for both front and rear racks, that is a good thing. The derailleur (the thing that shifts the gears) is on the lower end of the spectrum, but it should have a reasonable service life and won't be too expensive to replace/upgrade if necessary.

The frame geometry is decent and should be okay for the type of riding you have in mind. I suspect the saddles are going to need replacing for something a bit more comfortable PDQ (pretty darned quick) My personal preference is a Brooks leather but not everyone likes them. The wheelbase and the chainstay length are fine for touring.

You might want to spend the money to have the wheels trued up by someone that knows what they are doing. The wheels themselves are okay, but probably machine built and could stand to have a tweaking by a hands on pro.

Good luck and let us know how you make out with the tour and the move!

Aaron
__________________
Webshots is bailing out, if you find any of my posts with corrupt picture files and want to see them corrected please let me know. :(

ISO: A late 1980's Giant Iguana MTB frameset (or complete bike) 23" Red with yellow graphics.

"Cycling should be a way of life, not a hobby.
RIDE, YOU FOOL, RIDE!"
_Nicodemus

"Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
Aluminum: barely a hundred
Which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?"
_krazygluon
wahoonc is offline  
Old 05-24-10, 07:51 PM
  #6  
Membership Not Required
 
wahoonc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: On the road-USA
Posts: 16,855

Bikes: Giant Excursion, Raleigh Sports, Raleigh R.S.W. Compact, Motobecane? and about 20 more! OMG

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 70 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 16 Times in 15 Posts
Another option is to look for used...

Here is a couple that outfitted a world tour for next to nothing...

The options are endless, imagination is a plus...

Aaron
__________________
Webshots is bailing out, if you find any of my posts with corrupt picture files and want to see them corrected please let me know. :(

ISO: A late 1980's Giant Iguana MTB frameset (or complete bike) 23" Red with yellow graphics.

"Cycling should be a way of life, not a hobby.
RIDE, YOU FOOL, RIDE!"
_Nicodemus

"Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
Aluminum: barely a hundred
Which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?"
_krazygluon
wahoonc is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
Antoni
Touring
26
09-14-12 02:40 PM
marmot
Touring
9
11-23-10 09:54 AM
gattm99
Touring
10
05-24-10 08:26 PM
stewbart13
Touring
13
05-24-10 01:41 PM
courtleigh
Touring
3
05-09-10 10:37 AM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.