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Do you use a Camelbak?

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View Poll Results: Do you use a Camelbak?
Yes, every time I ride
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21.98%
Yes, but only when I tour
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20.88%
No, I tried it but didn't like it
19
20.88%
No, never tried one
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34.07%
What's a Camelbak?
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2.20%
Voters: 91. You may not vote on this poll

Do you use a Camelbak?

Old 07-21-10, 04:02 PM
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Originally Posted by SBRDude
Assuming that you never put any sports drink in it, my guess would be that either you put in some water that wasn't properly sanitized or that some bacteria got in through the mouthpiece. I have never had any trouble with mold. You could clean it carefully and put some bleach on it, or just buy a new one.
yup no sports drink, it might have been the water, we have been stopping at water spickets and gas stations.

the mold odly is at the base of the tube, and there is a little in the bladder, i think ill just get a new tube and try to clean the spots out of the bladder. but ya i was shocked since i have not but anything in nor has the water sat in the bladder for more than a day.
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Old 07-21-10, 04:17 PM
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I clean out my tube every few months or so. Leave it with bleach in for a day and rinse out. On a 4 month tour, we bought a bottle of bleach half way through the tour to clean out our camelbaks. Rather wasteful to leave behind but it did the job.

My partner stores her bladder in the freezer between uses to minimise growth. I don't care that much as I don't think it will make you ill. By the time you have noticed it, you will already have been drinking from it contaminated for some time.

I always use one on tour. I'm extremely fit and do not sweat much during the day (sometimes drink less than a bottle of water on the bike) so having it on my back is not a problem. Only carry less than 2 litres in it usually and have never thought it contributed to body problems experienced on the bike.
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Old 07-21-10, 04:48 PM
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Originally Posted by imi
No! never tried one, never will, never want to... don't want any bag, of any kind, on my back when riding all day...
Way to keep an open mind about something

Originally Posted by Jomayo112
I love having my camelbak on me, holds all my necessary bike repair equipment and 3 liters of water is perfect for long day rides. It def takes some getting used to riding with it on, but now its not even close to a bother to have on my back. Plus if you freeze the water in the bladder and then ride the next day it keeps your back cold!! I would def recommend them to anyone who likes to mtn bike or for long distance road biking!
You get it! You don't even need to freeze the bladder. Just pack it with ice in the morning and it'll stay cold for most of the day even in brutal heat. No sweaty back because the ice is cooling your core. A cooler core is almost always a good thing.

Originally Posted by vik
Nope...I don't like trying to keep them clean on tour or carrying weight on my back. A couple bottles are easy to drink from...have enough water for most days between stops and I can clean/dry easily when I feel the need.

I do use a camelback when mtn biking, but I throw the bladder into the freezer between rides to stop the nasty stuff from growing. Much easier than cleaning and drying those bladders.
I leave my Camelbak with water standing it for months at a time. No mold, no mildew, no growth. I don't know what you are using for a water source but mine seems very clean.

Originally Posted by slaani
Millions of fools? perhaps.

In order:

Saddle sores - contact between ass and saddle is experiencing more weight and therefore more impact trauma; saddle sores more likely to occur/worsen
Butt pain - contact between ass and saddle is experiencing more weight and therefore more impact trauma
Wrist pain - arms are carrying more unnecessary weight that your bike could, starting to see a trend? (applies less to more upright riders, but upright riders suffer the above even more!)
Back pain - same
Too hot - less circulation of air about the body; if you let the water cook in the sun for long enough the backpack becomes a huge heat battery on your back
Poorer balance - higher center of gravity overall as well as a direct impediment to freedom of motion
Unnecessary weight - bladder could easily be stored in pannier instead of, foolishly, on your back at the expense of a backpack's weight and all the above drawbacks.

If you're riding casually enough that you're not seeing any significant problems in these areas, I suppose the convenience may well be worth it. A long-term tourist is going to see these minor aches as potential injuries, though, and aim to minimize them over the months he may be on the bike. And to the guy saying these problems can all occur without a Camelbak -- that's the point. You likely have several of these issues already if you're cycling regularly, and added weight to your body indisputably makes each of them worse.
If you have all these problems while riding, a relatively light weight Camelbak isn't going to exacerbate them. If you have all the probems you listed while riding, you might want to have your fit checked

As for the Camelbak becoming a big heat sink just the opposite is true...if you use ice in them. The benefit of having 6 lbs of water at 0C on your back far outweighs any potential sweating problems...not that you'll sweat anyway.
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Old 07-21-10, 05:11 PM
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I would never have thought that liking/not liking a Camelbak would create such a furor. Personally, I like mine, but if you do not, then don't use one. BUT don't try to tell me I should not like mine, please.
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Old 07-21-10, 05:22 PM
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Very funny. Good enough to laugh at.
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Old 07-21-10, 10:42 PM
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Originally Posted by cyccommute
=
I leave my Camelbak with water standing it for months at a time. No mold, no mildew, no growth. I don't know what you are using for a water source but mine seems very clean.
Yuck! That is nasty.
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Old 07-21-10, 11:08 PM
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How many rationalizations in ORAL FIXATION.

One interesting point is the idea that one would use the Camel Back except one canèt monitor the water level easily. This is sorta the quandry. My Doc would like to see me drinking one ounce of water, per 2 pounds of body weight, per day. Thats at rest. Cycling, it would far exceed what I can haul down. I get through about 4 large bottles, a CB would be great for real needs, but they arenèt being met.
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Old 07-22-10, 05:42 AM
  #33  
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Originally Posted by Peterpan1
How many rationalizations in ORAL FIXATION.

One interesting point is the idea that one would use the Camel Back except one canèt monitor the water level easily. This is sorta the quandry. My Doc would like to see me drinking one ounce of water, per 2 pounds of body weight, per day. Thats at rest. Cycling, it would far exceed what I can haul down. I get through about 4 large bottles, a CB would be great for real needs, but they arenèt being met.
Do you carry 4 bottles with you? If you wore a camelback and put two large bottles in frame cages, then you would have much more water than 4 large bottles. I get what you're saying about monitoring intake, but experience should help you know how much and when to drink.
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Old 07-22-10, 08:05 AM
  #34  
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Originally Posted by travelmama
Yuck! That is nasty.
No. It's not. Most large municipal water supplies in the US are damned close to operating room sterile and plain water is a very poor growth medium. If I put sugars or other things in the bladder that organisms could grow in I'd worry about it.
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Old 07-22-10, 08:13 AM
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Originally Posted by Peterpan1
How many rationalizations in ORAL FIXATION.

One interesting point is the idea that one would use the Camel Back except one canèt monitor the water level easily. This is sorta the quandry. My Doc would like to see me drinking one ounce of water, per 2 pounds of body weight, per day. Thats at rest. Cycling, it would far exceed what I can haul down. I get through about 4 large bottles, a CB would be great for real needs, but they arenèt being met.
A large Camelbak carries 100 oz of water. That is slightly more than four 24 oz bottles. If you weigh around 200 lbs, that's your entire nonexercise daily requirement. If you need more water for exercise, you do exactly what you'd do with a bottle...add more water.

You can check the level of water in the Camelbak easily by reaching around with either hand and giving the bag a squeeze. Tells you instantly about how much water you have in it. If you leave a little air in the bag (not all that hard to do), you'll have an auditory method of telling how much water is in it.
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Old 07-22-10, 09:53 AM
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I like my Camelbak for a couple of reasons.

1) One advantage is having lots of water capacity on days when I need lots and there aren't a lot of opportunities for fill ups. I have yet to run out of water on the hottest, longest days when I had my Camelback and my 3 water bottles full at the start - and I like to drink a lot on really hot days. It's healthy.

2) The other is that the water stays colder longer in my Camelbak than bottles on the frame. If I fill it up before I start riding with some cold water from a faucet in a campground, it will stay refreshingly cool for quite awhile. If I fill it full of ice in the morning I'll have ice water for hours. On a hot day that's wonderful (plus it feels cool on my back - another plus.)

P. S. If I camp at a place with no water (I've done it once, but I'm guessing stealth campers do it quite often) the Camelback plus my three bottles hold enough for all my cooking, including coffee, oatmeal, soup, etc. to get through the night and the next morning.

P. P. S. When there's no reason to fill it and carry it on my back (cool weather, lots of chances to fill up bottles) I usually carry my Camelbak empty, bungied on to my gear. It's always nice to ride with nothing on your back.

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Old 07-22-10, 04:28 PM
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you should add to your list: had one, but no longer use it. thats the catagory i would fit in, being as mine was thefted by a no good thefting sneak.
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Old 07-22-10, 06:10 PM
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I don't cause I've got two cages but the Mrs. does, due to her 14.5 inch frame and only one cage, that's on the bottom of the down tube, where there's NO WAY she can reach it while riding!!
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Old 07-22-10, 08:42 PM
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Originally Posted by mr geeker
you should add to your list: had one, but no longer use it. thats the catagory i would fit in, being as mine was thefted by a no good thefting sneak.
That's a pretty nasty thing to steal. Did they get your underwear as well?
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Old 07-22-10, 09:42 PM
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Typically I use a water bladder of some sort, a CamelBak or lately I've been digging a WingNut Enduro pack. Touring is highly subjective. For me, I'm often riding in the dirt, in areas where I'd rather not have the funk off of the trail. Water bottles often become storage for powders or something a like.
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Old 07-22-10, 11:35 PM
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I live and ride here in Southern Nevada. Typical daytime highs this time of year in the Summer: 110 degrees, early evening lows still in upper 90's.
humidity, almost none (barely ever over 20%.)

We have a good name for riders who do not wear at least a 2 liter Camelbak or similar hydration pack out on long rides, we call them "Buzzard Bait".

Out here water is a synonym for survival. I literally thank God for my bladder packs. I went out and bought the best ones I could find and to me it's worth every penny !!!!!

Last edited by Chainring; 07-22-10 at 11:51 PM.
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Old 07-22-10, 11:48 PM
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Only when riding my unicycle. I've not actually toured on the unicycle (yet), but I might bring it with me next time.
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Old 07-23-10, 10:48 AM
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Originally Posted by Chainring
I live and ride here in Southern Nevada. Typical daytime highs this time of year in the Summer: 110 degrees, early evening lows still in upper 90's.
humidity, almost none (barely ever over 20%.)

We have a good name for riders who do not wear at least a 2 liter Camelbak or similar hydration pack out on long rides, we call them "Buzzard Bait".

Out here water is a synonym for survival. I literally thank God for my bladder packs. I went out and bought the best ones I could find and to me it's worth every penny !!!!!
congratulations Camelbak® marketing division, you have convinced us we will literally die without your product.

In our extreme heat is the worst place to be carrying unnecessary gear (not to mention wearing a blanket on your back). A bladder can be stowed in a pannier sans-$80 backpack for better insulation, less weight, and a cooler ride. String the hose up your fork and to your handlebars and you can even drink while you ride. All the ups plus some, none of the downs, and cheaper

For unloaded riding, though, you have a point. Anymore, I wouldn't dream of leaving for a 15mi+ ride here without 3 litres or so of water. When I started riding, I put myself in a few situations where I realized a breakdown would leave me stumbling through the desert chasing mirages like Lawrence of Arabia.
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Old 07-23-10, 11:46 AM
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Originally Posted by slaani
In our extreme heat is the worst place to be carrying unnecessary gear (not to mention wearing a blanket on your back). A bladder can be stowed in a pannier sans-$80 backpack for better insulation, less weight, and a cooler ride. String the hose up your fork and to your handlebars and you can even drink while you ride. All the ups plus some, none of the downs, and cheaper
Completely missed the part about loading the Camelbak with ice, didn't you? I don't know where you live but I've toured in heat and humidity with an ice loaded Camelbak. It's not a liability, it's an asset. Plus you get refreshing cold water for hours and hours. Not something you can get out of a water bottle, no matter how many socks you wrap around it.

By the way, the Camelbak was invented for extreme heat...the Hotter'N Hell 100.
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Old 07-23-10, 11:49 AM
  #45  
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Originally Posted by slaani
A bladder can be stowed in a pannier sans-$80 backpack for better insulation, less weight, and a cooler ride. String the hose up your fork and to your handlebars and you can even drink while you ride. All the ups plus some, none of the downs, and cheaper
I don't live in a desert, but no matter how hot or how long the ride i'm not going to carry panniers. And I suppose some hydration packs cost $80 but my CamelBak was under $40 and I've seen many cheaper than that. I think you just hate CamelBak so much you're wildly overestimating their average price...
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Old 07-23-10, 12:46 PM
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I'm not totally sure...
but panniers may be a thing of the past for me
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Old 07-23-10, 03:19 PM
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This thread is in danger of being moved to "religious argument" section.
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Old 07-23-10, 07:29 PM
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Can I get a "Halelujah"?
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Old 07-23-10, 10:02 PM
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Two points on concerns listed up the thread:
1. Camelback makes cleaning tablets. I've just seen them in the stores so I don't know what they are or how they work. I'd guess they're more convenient than a bottle of bleach.
2. Camelback also makes a flow meter that goes on the hose and tells you how much you're drinking. I've only seen that one on the internet, no idea if it works.

I tried one years ago and didn't like the way the water flowed out, I think maybe the valve was bad so it leaked. But I'm on the verge of getting one for long hot (non-pannier) rides. Ice water in water bottles lasts less than half an hour up against my kidneys in jersey pockets.
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Old 07-24-10, 12:04 AM
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Apart from the super comfortable ride, a nice aspect of touring on a recumbent is that you can put a camelback in the pod on the back of the seat (directly behind your head). Just drape the tube over your shoulder and sip any time. And, being enclosed in the pod, the water stays cool the entire day. It's almost decadent.
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