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Max Weight

Old 07-25-10, 09:03 PM
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Max Weight

So for loading up a bike, how much could a guy really carry and still maintain control and decent mileage. I want to go on a year+ tour and hit several climbing destinations along the way. Which means I will have some additional crap to carry.
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Old 07-25-10, 09:05 PM
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I did a camping tour with 56 lbs of gear.
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Old 07-25-10, 09:11 PM
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I've thought about this, and come to the conclusion that you bring your personal climbing gear and pick up partners who have the rope & rack. Carry much more than that and your cycling becomes un-fun, if you can even manage it.

Unless you are bringing your partner with you, of course. Then you are just SOL.

To answer your actual question, I don't have an actual answer but my gut feel would be it depends on you & your bike how much weight you can take on. I'm pretty unhappy at anything over about 45 pounds pannier weight on the bike, and I have a problem with trailers. I'm a Lynne Hill sized person, though.

If you did trailer & 4 panniers on a really solid bike, you could probably haul as much as you could stand, but be careful on the descents.
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Old 07-25-10, 09:41 PM
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Others may have a bit more authority than me on this point but..... It depends a great deal on your cycling abilities and comfort level.

E.g. if you like lots of creature comforts, you'll wind up with lots of gear. If you can go without, you can go with less.

A few things to consider:

• If you haven't toured before, you really ought to do a shorter tour (e.g. 1 week) first to get some experience and shake out your gear & bike. Usually what you need for 1-2 weeks is very close to what you need for longer tours.
• You can usually send stuff home or ditch it.
• It will be harder, but not impossible, to get someone to send you stuff.
• If you need to carry a ton of gear, consider a trailer.
• Don't skimp on the repair gear.
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Old 07-25-10, 09:55 PM
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from your other post:
"Expedition bike and trailer questions
I am looking for some direction. I am taking a year to a year and a half and riding from bellingham to tierra del fuego. I used to race triathalons and I've worked as a bike rickshaw driver. I need some help in finding a good bike, trailer, and saddle bags. I need the trailer as I am bringing a decent load of climbing gear (about 30-35lbs worth).

I know nothing about this. But I can't get this idea out of my head. Constructive suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

Ryan"

I'd dare to toss you the idea of a Surly Big Dummy
https://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=391518

I think it can handle up to 400lbs including the rider's weight

I've used it for touring
and i've used it while touring using buses, and Amtrak trains

I would bet that I've carried over 100lbs on it while touring... ridiculous? yes
well... kind of
but not really

it was long low and slow touring
actually it was living outside
complete with laptop, tipi, wood burning stove, hatchet, plenty of clothing
and at least 7 days of food at any given moment

typically I'd cover 40 miles per day on average.

if it was a hilly effort, 60 miles could easily turn out to be 16hrs of work

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i7VhZUCnkuE
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Old 07-25-10, 11:22 PM
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I guess it would be doable, the Big Dummy (my feeling exactly for most touring aps) might be a great choice here, just gear it low enough, and count on doing lower mileages than most. I met a guy cycling around canada with 150 pounds of gear. What's more, it really wasn't evident from the way he had it tightly packed all over his bike, what it all was. He seemed to be doing a normal camping tour with some chains or something, he just coundn't leave behind. He looked like the bike might keel over at any moment when he wasn't riding it, since the weight on a bike is pretty high.

One concern I would have would be the terrain you would likely encounter. Not all climbing areas are mountainous, but obviously some are. Another point is the weight of modern"lightweight" gear. Usually heavy as hell. Friends aren't as light as the proverbial nuts collected on the walk up the snowdon railway; harnesses weigh more than swami belts; belay devices weigh more, than body belays.

All that said, for those who could aford them, a lot of early climbers and mountaineers did get around on bikes, so it is possible at some level, just a mater of finding your workable ballance. An extreme recent case was the guy who cycled to everest from europe and climbed it. Maybe not a technical climb but lots of protective clothing to wear!
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Old 07-25-10, 11:25 PM
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Originally Posted by Peterpan1
I guess it would be doable, the Big Dummy (my feeling exactly for most touring aps) might be a great choice here, just gear it low enough, and count on doing lower mileages than most. I met a guy cycling around canada with 150 pounds of gear. What's more, it really wasn't evident from the way he had it tightly packed all over his bike, what it all was. He seemed to be doing a normal camping tour with some chains or something, he just coundn't leave behind. He looked like the bike might keel over at any moment when he wasn't riding it, since the weight on a bike is pretty high.

One concern I would have would be the terrain you would likely encounter. Not all climbing areas are mountainous, but obviously some are. Another point is the weight of modern"lightweight" gear. Usually heavy as hell. Friends aren't as light as the proverbial nuts collected on the walk up the snowdon railway; harnesses weigh more than swami belts; belay devices weigh more, than body belays.

All that said, for those who could aford them, a lot of early climbers and mountaineers did get around on bikes, so it is possible at some level, just a mater of finding your workable ballance. An extreme recent case was the guy who cycled to everest from europe and climbed it. Maybe not a technical climb but lots of protective clothing to wear!
that would have been Goran Kropp!
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Göran_Kropp
https://www.google.com/search?client=...UTF-8&oe=UTF-8
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Old 07-25-10, 11:36 PM
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Thanks guys. The Surly looks like just the kind of bike I am after. I was only thinking of around 60-70lbs plus my 170. It's true you can do more with less. I'm super stoked to have a goal to work for. Fall in the Valley, winter surfing in central america, summer climbing in Peru and Bolivia then spend late winter in Patagonia. It's a dream! I really appreciate the feedback.
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Old 07-25-10, 11:38 PM
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Originally Posted by G. Ryan Johnson
Thanks guys. The Surly looks like just the kind of bike I am after. I was only thinking of around 60-70lbs plus my 170. It's true you can do more with less. I'm super stoked to have a goal to work for. Fall in the Valley, winter surfing in central america, summer climbing in Peru and Bolivia then spend late winter in Patagonia. It's a dream! I really appreciate the feedback.
pick strong wheels... like a WTB LaserDisc DH (downhill rims)
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Old 07-25-10, 11:38 PM
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you might be interested in this; https://www.ridingthespine.com/
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Old 07-26-10, 11:03 PM
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All I can say is maybe it's not an issue of "max weight". Maybe your approach should be to reduce weight. It's sort of like asking the question "what should be my personal max weight for my body".

Less is more.

It's that simple.

It was said above, and I second it, get some experience. Specifically go out on lots of short tours. The more the better. One night, sub-24-hour. Or 48 hour rides. Start leaving things behind. Mostly you'll find that you carry a ton of stuff you don't need. Cut radically. THe cost of leaving something behind and needing it is very low risk on short 24 to 48 hour rides. THis is the quickest way to learn the value of lightness.

Also... it's just way to damn expensive to buy and lug so much stuff. I'd love to see someone experiment with a tarp and bug net or a home made bivy rather then go out and dump $300 on a tent before they even know what they need.

Just start simply with what you have. I've seen people tour like pro's with a used baby hauler and a 1980's era road bike. It doesn't matter what you have, it matters how you use it.

I tend to focus on adaptability, multi-use / versatile items, experience and knowlege. Knowlege weighs nothing.

Embrace adversity. Make sure you get a little wet or cold on your 24-48 hour rides. It's not all sunny warm days on longer tours.

Oh, and check out the backpackinglight.com forums. They'll change your life.

https://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-...glight/forums/

Peace and good luck

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Old 07-27-10, 12:04 AM
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You carry a lot and you go slow, you carry little and go fast. I was never a big person so I carried little and went fast. I'm a fat person now and carry little and go slow. I'm carrying 50lbs more fat than necessary so with 25lbs of gear I'd say 75lbs would have been my limit when I was younger and fit. When I weighed 160lbs 75lbs would seem insane but if I accommodated myself to that reality I could have done it going 4mph uphills that I'd normally do at 8mph and 8mph on very slight grades I'd do at 12mph.

If you search around the forums there's a link to a website calculating how many watts it takes to climb a particular grade with a given weight and type of bike, I'll try and find it. Anyway what it will tell you is what you will figure out in a day, lots of weight makes you go slow up ANY incline and it doesn't take much of an incline to go VERY slow with a lot of weight at a given effort.

this is a total WAG but if you were able to blast around doing 90mile days on your Litespeed with 20lbs of gear just getting on an unloaded Big Dummy would probably put you into a 75mile day. Toss on 75lbs and 50mile days would be reasonable.

The max. weight you're capable of carrying up one hill and down the other side isn't the same as the weight you'd prefer to carry up and down between breakfast, lunch and dinner.
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Old 07-27-10, 09:51 AM
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While the load carrying capacity of the Big Dummy is impressive, I would be concerned about handling stability and braking capability on mountains.

If you are still open to options, check out Cycle Tote: https://www.cycletote.com/index.php?page=productsTouring They even offer a braking option for more stopping power.

Their trailers were on my 'short list' because of the lower center-of-gravity design, but I had the time and resources to build my own, so I set up my tourer with front disc brake, rear V-brake with Booster, and a trailer hitch. Still fine tuning, but it worked well on a hilly 78mi loop hauling 30lbs of gear. Now I just need to upgrade my 'motor'! At most, I would be carrying 60lbs of gear.

Good luck on your tour, whatever you decide to ride.
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Old 07-27-10, 09:59 AM
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Hi,

I weigh 65 kg. My whole luggage (including the bike) should not be more than my body wheight.

In general I carry 30-35 kg (w/o bike) with me. The maximum was nearly 50 kg (w/o bike).

But what is a descent milage. I cycle in average 75 km per day (but I visit cities, talk with people and hike, climb mountains on tour). If I cycle only I can go 200 km per day on the flat with this amount of luggage - but I don't want.

Thomas
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Old 07-27-10, 03:45 PM
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Originally Posted by badamsjr
While the load carrying capacity of the Big Dummy is impressive, I would be concerned about handling stability and braking capability on mountains.

If you are still open to options, check out Cycle Tote: https://www.cycletote.com/index.php?page=productsTouring They even offer a braking option for more stopping power.

Their trailers were on my 'short list' because of the lower center-of-gravity design, but I had the time and resources to build my own, so I set up my tourer with front disc brake, rear V-brake with Booster, and a trailer hitch. Still fine tuning, but it worked well on a hilly 78mi loop hauling 30lbs of gear. Now I just need to upgrade my 'motor'! At most, I would be carrying 60lbs of gear.

Good luck on your tour, whatever you decide to ride.
I've had my Dummy for over 2 years now.
how many miles do i have on this bike, I'd say over 20K

i have a bunch of experience with trailers

my current dummy build:
CK steelset headset
H-bars
Avid levers
BB'5, 203(f) 185(r)
AVID metalic pads
X7 shifters and derailleurs
a squartaper Truvativ IsoFlow crankset with steel rings
SRAM PG950 11/34 cogset
XT hubs laced to WTB LaserDisc DH

uhh... why is this better than a trailer?

no push

there isnt a trailer to push from behind

I've used the Dummy to some stupid extents, with a lot of dirt camping/touring

honestly, this bike is more than capable to handle expedition type of hauling

a BOB trailer? The dummy easily holds 1 BOB trailer bag on either side
plus you can actually start stacking them up top
the Dummy would probably fit 4 BOB trailer bags
plus it takes racks and panniers up front

honestly The Dummy holds a massive amounts
brakes... 203mm(f) and 185mm(r) rotors with metalic pads... on a set of DH rims?
its got a whole lot of braking power
in the dirt?
uhh... its a MTB
its got gears
wheels
and brakes for dirt...
thats what it is.

here's a couple of vids:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AzlLtpG3QIM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i7VhZUCnkuE

a sample of what you can do with a dummy
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Old 07-27-10, 05:03 PM
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AsanaCycles: I am not trying to SELL the OP a trailer, just making a suggestion. He can decide for himself what he wants to do. I took his post to mean he was looking for different ideas about carrying his gear.
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Old 07-27-10, 06:41 PM
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170 plus 70, hey, that's me after the pancake breakfast! Don't worry about it! The downside to the Dummy is that it weighs a lot without a load, so unless you have a capacity issue, your weight surely doesn't merit any special attention.

One issue that would worry me is that the combination of being off climbing, with the destinations, is a thief's paradise. I might spend some time considering how to survive theft. A trendy bike or unlockable trailer is possibly not the best option.
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Old 07-27-10, 07:00 PM
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Originally Posted by Peterpan1
170 plus 70, hey, that's me after the pancake breakfast! Don't worry about it! The downside to the Dummy is that it weighs a lot without a load, so unless you have a capacity issue, your weight surely doesn't merit any special attention.

One issue that would worry me is that the combination of being off climbing, with the destinations, is a thief's paradise. I might spend some time considering how to survive theft. A trendy bike or unlockable trailer is possibly not the best option.
PacSafe:

this is a PacSafe 120 that I've used, it fits a BOB trailer bag.
https://www.pacsafe.com/www/index.php
in the past I've chosen a BOB trailer bag, and a Gregory Forester hiking backpack.
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Old 08-02-10, 09:50 PM
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BTW, I should state I make no bones about my weight. I weigh a healthy 260. (Am 6'5") While I'd like to get down to a light 235, and do drop into the 250's regularly I don't worry about it to much and yes I still aim for self sustained touring weights of 30lbs road or 40lbs off road / backroad. And YES this INCLUDES the bike weight. i.e. 19.5lbs Salsa Campeon, 25lbs Cross Check or 29lbs Salsa Fargo. So why would someone who weighs 260lbs be obsessed with keeping loads so light?

1) it's not about going fast, it's about having the time and energy to do side trips and smell the roses and yet still be comfortable enough and with enough energy to ride 14 hours of the day... and that is how I can put in more miles and yet somehow see more and be more relaxed and refreshed

2) it's not all about the weight, it's about simplicity... less stuff to buy, less stuff to pack/repack, less stuff to worry about. Hence my creedo. Less stuff, more freedom.

3) it's not all about the weight, it's about less bulk... this is particularly true when backroad and off road touring. If you look at the popular frame bag systems designed by Revelate Designs (previously Epic Designs) and Carousel Design works you'll see it's all about reducing swinging bulk so the bike handles well on rough terrain. I use these same systems for road riding as well and to put it bluntly I can attack a hill and hammer out of the saddle with my fully loaded self supported road bike weighing 30 lbs and there is no bob or tail whip. You almost forget you have it there at all. Alternatively if you've ever gone over a washboard with two traditional racks and four pannier bags you'll know exactly what I mean by swinging weight and bulk. None of that on a frame bag system.

But to put it to you as simply as possible it's:

Being able to easily swing your fully loaded rig over a fence, or grab the top tube and carry it up some stairs.

Something someone said on the backpackinglight.com forums once that really connected with me.

Going UL (ultralight) is like being able to go out for a sunday stroll after breakfast and just keep going for days or even weeks.

That's freedom. Freedom to roam.

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Old 08-02-10, 10:41 PM
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Originally Posted by AsanaCycles
Ha ha yeah that guy was insane! Very cool!
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Old 08-02-10, 11:08 PM
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more on Goran Kropp
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H9x1J...eature=related
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Old 08-02-10, 11:43 PM
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Packsafe is a great tool, but that stuff cuts like butter with wire shears. Still keep the non-serious fingers at bay.
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Old 08-02-10, 11:51 PM
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Originally Posted by Peterpan1
Packsafe is a great tool, but that stuff cuts like butter with wire shears. Still keep the non-serious fingers at bay.
agreed
its all a bunch of hooey
I rarely use it, in fact I should sell it!

I don't ever seem to be the envrions that demand that much securtiy
or do I carry that much stuff on tour... lately
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