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Cannondale Touring Bikes

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Cannondale Touring Bikes

Old 08-02-10, 12:32 PM
  #51  
njkayaker
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Originally Posted by BigBlueToe View Post
Originally Posted by NeilGunton
Buy the bike for the application - no one bike can "do it all".
I agree. If you can afford it, buy different bikes for different applications. (That's why I have 4. My wife says I don't need that many, but I do, I really do!) If you can't afford more than one, buy it for the application which is the most important to you and don't be too unhappy when it isn't quite as suitable for the others.
Any bike is going to be a compromise but a good touring bike might be the most flexible/versatile choice for somebody wanting to do different things with it.

I do loaded touring, long distance rides, (fairly) fast group rides with one bike. And it's fine for all of these uses.
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Old 08-02-10, 01:23 PM
  #52  
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Originally Posted by njkayaker View Post
Any bike is going to be a compromise but a good touring bike might be the most flexible/versatile choice for somebody wanting to do different things with it.

I do loaded touring, long distance rides, (fairly) fast group rides with one bike. And it's fine for all of these uses.
yeah when I get my touring bike I will return my road bike back to the way it was and use it as my daiily rider for the most part, until then unfortunately my current bike is going to have to do double duty.
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Old 08-02-10, 02:04 PM
  #53  
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Originally Posted by njkayaker View Post
Have you ridden one? It seems very well-liked.
Yes. My belief is that the reason that they are so "well liked" is first off because there's not a whole lot of bikes in that price range to compare them to. Secondly they are not a "big" company so everyone is on the band wagon with the underdog and third they are very "in fashion". If you were to scope out the geometry, it's not quite right. First and foremost the TT is too short. The paint or powdercoat is utilitarian. They are uninspired. They ride like they're already loaded instead of riding "light" so when you put some weight on them they really ride loaded.
If you want a decent new steel touring frame, check out the Raleigh Sojourn which is in the same price range and has racks fenders and disc brakes.
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Old 08-02-10, 02:27 PM
  #54  
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Originally Posted by Ruffinit View Post
Yes. My belief is that the reason that they are so "well liked" is first off because there's not a whole lot of bikes in that price range to compare them to. Secondly they are not a "big" company so everyone is on the band wagon with the underdog and third they are very "in fashion".
This might explain part of it but not all of it. There seem to be a fair number of credible (experience wise) people who like the LHT.

Originally Posted by Ruffinit View Post
If you were to scope out the geometry, it's not quite right. First and foremost the TT is too short. The paint or powdercoat is utilitarian. They are uninspired. They ride like they're already loaded instead of riding "light" so when you put some weight on them they really ride loaded.
If you want a decent new steel touring frame, check out the Raleigh Sojourn which is in the same price range and has racks fenders and disc brakes.
(I'd have to do too much work to assess your "top tube" comment!)

The Cannondale isn't really much more expensive (about $200). The 520 is about the same price. The Rocky Mountain Sherpa 30 is $1600 (a good bit more money but not crazy more). The Jamis Aurora is about the same price (but not quite a loaded tourer, even though some people find that it works for them).

The Sojourn looks nice.

(In my opinion, the Sherpa rides fine unloaded and loaded.)

================

Anyway, these other bikes are irrelevant unless his LBS can sell them.

Keep in mind that we are talking about somebody who isn't going to be looking around at other bikes.

"Geo Cruise" should list what brands his local LBS has.

Last edited by njkayaker; 08-02-10 at 02:33 PM.
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Old 08-02-10, 04:11 PM
  #55  
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Originally Posted by njkayaker View Post
This might explain part of it but not all of it. There seem to be a fair number of credible (experience wise) people who like the LHT.



(I'd have to do too much work to assess your "top tube" comment!)

The Cannondale isn't really much more expensive (about $200). The 520 is about the same price. The Rocky Mountain Sherpa 30 is $1600 (a good bit more money but not crazy more). The Jamis Aurora is about the same price (but not quite a loaded tourer, even though some people find that it works for them).

The Sojourn looks nice.

(In my opinion, the Sherpa rides fine unloaded and loaded.)

================

Anyway, these other bikes are irrelevant unless his LBS can sell them.

Keep in mind that we are talking about somebody who isn't going to be looking around at other bikes.

"Geo Cruise" should list what brands his local LBS has.

I would list what brands he sells but this thread is turning into a pissing contest and I don't wish to add fuel to the fire. I WILL be looking around, had you read my posts you would know I have not committed to buying anything, so I am done in here, I thank those who were kind enough to help share their opinions I found it very informative,
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Old 08-03-10, 12:30 AM
  #56  
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Check out all the bikes that fit your needs and body, not just the ones sold at your friend's shop. Perhaps the Cannondale will be "the one", perhaps not. Myself I find braking on current model Trek 520's to be far better than on current model Cannondale T1's, but that might not be your experience, or maybe you'll find the ride feel better on one or the other or on something else. Set a maximum you are willing to spend and don't overthink it, just find one that fits and feels right for you and get going. It's not like you'll be married to the bike for 26 years or some such sentence. Wait a minute... I'm still riding (and enjoying) my 26 year old touring bike!
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Old 08-04-10, 03:47 PM
  #57  
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Originally Posted by Ruffinit View Post
Yes. My belief is that the reason that they are so "well liked" is first off because there's not a whole lot of bikes in that price range to compare them to. Secondly they are not a "big" company so everyone is on the band wagon with the underdog and third they are very "in fashion". If you were to scope out the geometry, it's not quite right. First and foremost the TT is too short. The paint or powdercoat is utilitarian. They are uninspired. They ride like they're already loaded instead of riding "light" so when you put some weight on them they really ride loaded.
If you want a decent new steel touring frame, check out the Raleigh Sojourn which is in the same price range and has racks fenders and disc brakes.
Actually Surly is owned by QBP one of if not the largest cycling/distributing companies in the world.
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Old 08-04-10, 08:00 PM
  #58  
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Have two Cannondales a 2005 T800 and a 1987 ST400 both outstanding rides, just finished a week tour on the T800 and couldn't ask for a better ride.
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Old 08-05-10, 07:44 AM
  #59  
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I have a 1999 Cannondale T700 and my wife has a 2000 Cannondale T800. We both love our bikes and have ridden them quite a lot over the past decade (in fact, it's still my main commuter bike). I have other aluminum bikes, but none are as comfortable or versatile as the Cannondales. My only regret is that I bought the T700 and not the T1000 at the time, which had better components. If I had to do it over again, I would not hesitate to buy another Cannondale with the best components I could afford.
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Old 08-05-10, 09:20 AM
  #60  
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Originally Posted by kaliayev View Post
Actually Surly is owned by QBP one of if not the largest cycling/distributing companies in the world.
I think Ruffinit knows that (that is why "big" is in quotes). The marketing of Surleys doesn't give the impression that Surly is not "big" (note the quotes).

Anyway, the only objective criticism he indicated was the top-tube length (and that isn't easy to validate) and the ride-quality (even that isn't completely objective).
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Old 08-06-10, 09:40 AM
  #61  
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Canondale started out as a touring company, as far as I remember. I think their first product was their tents. Then they got in when the auminum bike thing came along, the Carbon fibre or Ti of it's day. Then later they struck gold with MTbs. Never tried their touring bikes, but one of my favorite MTBs was a C. If you make it into TO, you should try out the Urbane Cyclist touring bike, it is really nice, and so is the shop.
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Old 08-06-10, 01:13 PM
  #62  
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I believe C'dale's first "real" product was the Bugger bike trailer. They also had an early line of tents and sleeping bags (I still have an early 1980s-vintage Cannondale sleeping bag somewhere in my basement).
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Old 08-06-10, 01:54 PM
  #63  
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Originally Posted by Peterpan1 View Post
Canondale started out as a touring company, as far as I remember. I think their first product was their tents. Then they got in when the auminum bike thing came along, the Carbon fibre or Ti of it's day. Then later they struck gold with MTbs. Never tried their touring bikes, but one of my favorite MTBs was a C. If you make it into TO, you should try out the Urbane Cyclist touring bike, it is really nice, and so is the shop.

Originally Posted by briwasson View Post
I believe C'dale's first "real" product was the Bugger bike trailer. They also had an early line of tents and sleeping bags (I still have an early 1980s-vintage Cannondale sleeping bag somewhere in my basement).
Tents and camping gear were first. Then trailers. Then clothing sold through L.L. Bean which gave them enough capital to start building bikes. Then bike bags. Their first $1 million dollars was made on trailers, however.

Bikes didn't come along until the company had been in business for 13 years...1983. To their credit, they have had at least one touring model in the line since 1983...and usually 2.
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Old 08-06-10, 02:08 PM
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My first set of cycling gloves were Cannondales. Nice leather palms with off-white mesh. Bought them in the early 80s and wore them until the mid-90s.

Edit: I had one of their velcro water bottles made around the same time. Interesting idea, but the bottle didn't last.

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Old 08-06-10, 02:09 PM
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Was a touring bike the first bike? I seem to remember a period of no MTBs, or obviously road racing etc... Just touring. Back pre MTBs, touring bikes were hot, not like today when they are a backwater.

On wiki it says their first frame was 350 in 1983, sorta what the LHT would sell for today if QBP would let it find it's price.

Last edited by NoReg; 08-06-10 at 02:14 PM.
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Old 08-06-10, 02:25 PM
  #66  
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the old MTB's with the shock in the head tube, were actually worked really good for what was on the market at the time, but I passed them over because I wanted to have a variety of it was options should I need to replace broken parts and the Cannondale's had a lot of parts that only they could supply, so I bought my old Giant and it served me very well for many years only when my knee to too sore and weak to handle the shock of off roading. So I gave it to my landlord's son who is 14 and taller than I am LOL, so he is putting it to good use now and loving it.
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Old 08-06-10, 03:53 PM
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Originally Posted by Peterpan1 View Post
Was a touring bike the first bike? I seem to remember a period of no MTBs, or obviously road racing etc... Just touring. Back pre MTBs, touring bikes were hot, not like today when they are a backwater.

On wiki it says their first frame was 350 in 1983, sorta what the LHT would sell for today if QBP would let it find it's price.
Yes, their first bike was the ST-500. It was sold as a 'sport touring' bike but it certainly was more touring oriented than sport oriented. $350 in 1983 is $630 in today's dollars.
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