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-   -   Pictures of your loaded rigs? (https://www.bikeforums.net/touring/69234-pictures-your-loaded-rigs.html)

MyWar 09-20-11 03:47 PM

First overnight trip with my LHT, Oxbow Park.

http://i56.tinypic.com/2ly0g41.jpg

zeppinger 09-21-11 06:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gus Riley (Post 13137153)
LOL! That's so cool! I named my LHT that because my neighbor kept calling her Shirley. I gave up, and named her.

Cool name though, no?! Picture?

Sorry Gus, forgot to check this thread! Here is a picture of MY SHIRLEY! Click here for a picture of me and Shirley in front of mt. Everest in Tibet!

http://www.crazyguyonabike.com/doc/p...v=6&size=large

wicki 09-22-11 09:27 AM

There will be a bonding on the long road ....well hopefully, then i am sure it wont be a pig

RB1-luvr 09-22-11 09:33 AM

I like the picture of the two loads of wood. way to go.

I did something similar once. Was too lazy to ride back to the check in cabin:

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4112/...4fec4fe7_b.jpg

bagxlee 09-22-11 11:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RB1-luvr (Post 13262597)
I like the picture of the two loads of wood. way to go.


Thanks, but it was actually three loads. (Two on the rear, one of the front.) :)

Loving the Bridgestone!

Atadloco 09-23-11 08:25 AM

Here is a pic the night before I left for my first mini mini tour..

http://i1126.photobucket.com/albums/...ep20170526.jpg

RB1-luvr 09-23-11 08:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bagxlee (Post 13263127)
Thanks, but it was actually three loads. (Two on the rear, one of the front.) :)

Loving the Bridgestone!

AH YES, three loads. you're crazy. It was actually just a Nashbar frame with Bridgestone stickers. I replaced that bike with a Windsor this year and sadly have not ridden it yet :-(

Gus Riley 09-23-11 11:11 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by zeppinger (Post 13256494)
Sorry Gus, forgot to check this thread! Here is a picture of MY SHIRLEY! Click here for a picture of me and Shirley in front of mt. Everest in Tibet!

http://www.crazyguyonabike.com/doc/p...v=6&size=large

She's a rough old gal isn't she. Your journey is a huge testiment to the toughness, and design of the LHT! Mine will have to be called Shirley Jr. !

jdom 09-23-11 11:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Atadloco (Post 13267191)
Here is a pic the night before I left for my first mini mini tour..

http://i1126.photobucket.com/albums/...ep20170526.jpg

Is the sloaping top tube new for the LHT or is that just the camera angle that makes it look like it's sloaped.
Nice bike by the way,I love my LHT.

aceofspaids 09-23-11 11:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jdom (Post 13268230)
Is the sloaping top tube new for the LHT or is that just the camera angle that makes it look like it's sloaped.
Nice bike by the way,I love my LHT.

Looks like the bike is parked on a down slope to me (back wheel looks to be sitting on lower ground) and that might make it look like the top tube off of level.

jdom 09-23-11 03:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by aceofspaids (Post 13268378)
Looks like the bike is parked on a down slope to me (back wheel looks to be sitting on lower ground) and that might make it look like the top tube off of level.

Yeah that looks like it,I didn't notice that before.

digitalmouse 09-27-11 03:52 PM

https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-L...2052010469.jpg

my old Anthrotech trike with a Leitra nose fairing. this was during my 2010 tour from Copenhagen, Denmark to Wijk bei Duurstede, Holland. rack in back carried sleeping bag, hammock with rain cover, clothes, tools, water. everything but sleeping bag fit inside huge black ortlieb waterproof bag.

https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-m...4052010561.jpg

current ride lets me carry everything, up to 30 kilos, inside a streamlined tailbox:

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-H...2011.22.24.jpg

this does force me to really think about what i really need to take with me, and still have room to bring home the occassional souvenier. :)

djb 09-27-11 06:28 PM

mr mouse, while that is very intriguing and quite cool looking, around here I really dont see how it would be safe riding it around, its so much wider than a regular bike, so cars going by would be a tricky situation. Not to mention that over here, cars in general do not give bicycles the same respect or even safe treatment...

still quite interesting (it must be quite hot inside it if it is warm out no?)

Terry66 10-02-11 09:25 PM

Turns out the Salsa Vaya makes a fine touring bike. Here she is all decked out with 700X37 WTB all terrain tires for a 140 mile mini tour down the crushed limestone Katy Trail

http://www.watsonfx.com/katy5.jpg

http://www.watsonfx.com/katy2.jpg

digitalmouse 10-03-11 06:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by djb (Post 13287171)
mr mouse, while that is very intriguing and quite cool looking, around here I really dont see how it would be safe riding it around, its so much wider than a regular bike, so cars going by would be a tricky situation.

turns out that being a bit wider (in the case of my old Red-n-White Anthrotech/Leitra in the photos above), commands a lot of respect and improves visibility because it is so different looking. I know the builder of the Leitra (80+ year old C.G. Rassmussen) has cycled his Leitras many times in the U.S. with little to no trouble. He learns the appropriate rules (where bikes are allowed to ride - which varies from state to state interestingly) where necessary.

during my cross country tours in Europe, cars and trucks gave me width berth when needed - with only one fat old lady barking at me in German because i was doing 30 kph in a 30 kph zone, and thought that was too slow for some reason. :P

for the Nomad (bottom photo), it's just a wee bit wider than a standard bike handlebars, so even less worry there. again it's shape (especially when i have the orange and black nose fairing on it) creates a sense of space and people slow down and pass with care if only out of curiosity.

Quote:

Originally Posted by djb (Post 13287171)
Not to mention that over here, cars in general do not give bicycles the same respect or even safe treatment...

ah well that *is* a problem. and can be best dealt with by knowing the rules for cycles in your area like the back of your hand. quiet and calm informing the ignorant goes a long way most times. hopefully that attitude will change as the 'old guard' of people with less common sense pass on.

Quote:

Originally Posted by djb (Post 13287171)
still quite interesting (it must be quite hot inside it if it is warm out no?)

when fully buttoned up for the wintertime it gets warm enough inside that i can cycle in only a tshirt or light sweater when the temperature is below freezing outside.

in the photos above, I get lots of cross-breeze ventilation from the open sides, and there are vents near the nose to provide more cooling along the legs and chest.

Ekdog 10-03-11 06:48 AM

@Terry 66.

Nice! :thumb: What kind of trunk bag is that?

Bike Hermit 10-03-11 08:08 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Atadloco (Post 13267191)
Here is a pic the night before I left for my first mini mini tour..

http://i1126.photobucket.com/albums/...ep20170526.jpg

Lone Peak panniers? How do you like them?

Terry66 10-03-11 08:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ekdog (Post 13311066)
@Terry 66.

Nice! :thumb: What kind of trunk bag is that?

Thanks!

The bag is a Transit brand. It is a cheap bag that I got from my LBS. I don't think it is waterproof. The weather was going to be nice, so I stuck it on the front and put my food and camera in it. I plan to get something a little nicer before my next trip. Maybe panniers on the front? We'll see.

djb 10-03-11 10:47 AM

digimouse, thanks for getting back on those enquiries. I must say your trikes are very intriguing. I have never tried a three wheeler, never even tried a two wheeler recumbent. Its interesting, your fully bodied one really does make me think of the microcars of the 50s and 60s, I guess its the overall shape of the bodies that very much looks like some of those cars.

As someone who rides in the city a lot, we have much less bicycle dedicated bike lanes than in Europe--that said, Montreal is one of the better N American cities in this regard, but I would still be quite apprehensive riding one of your bikes around in Montreal, simply due to the width factor.

again, very very neat seeing your photos. Glad you did not get hurt more with the wheel turning in incident.
cheers

ps, for years I have watched Tom Kristensen racing at Lemans. Was there for the 2004 race. Yes, I have feet in both camps of lifelong bicycling as well as a fan of motorsport....

simpleseat 10-03-11 01:26 PM

Bike Hermit,
Like the assistant in the background. love those mini trips.
Cheers!

Ekdog 10-04-11 05:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Terry66 (Post 13311407)
Thanks!

The bag is a Transit brand. It is a cheap bag that I got from my LBS. I don't think it is waterproof. The weather was going to be nice, so I stuck it on the front and put my food and camera in it. I plan to get something a little nicer before my next trip. Maybe panniers on the front? We'll see.

Or you could put your camera in a Zip Lock bag and carry on with that same bag.

IrvingBartowski 10-04-11 07:51 PM

Hybrid Touring Bike
 
1 Attachment(s)
Hi...
this is my bike

i use this bike to come home from Yogyakarta (where i study) - Purbalingga (my home) about 190kms ;

http://www.bikeforums.net/attachment...2&d=1317779216


Code:

ps: sorry for my bad english
:)

digitalmouse 10-06-11 05:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by djb (Post 13312194)
...I would still be quite apprehensive riding one of your bikes around in Montreal, simply due to the width factor...

The Anthrotech, at 36 inches (92 cm), is certianly the wider of the two trikes, and might not be suitable for some areas of the city. On the other hand it is *very* stable in fast cornering, and has a fairly tight turning radius. On roads with no cycle lane, cars and trucks have no problems passing me when traffic permits.

The Nomad Sport is 27 inches wide (70 cm), and much easier to slip between cars and various road obstacles. Motor vehicles can also pass easier without drifting into oncoming traffic.

In either case, both rides are excellent for long tours, having lots of rack space or under-seat storage, and the comfort of a recumbent position.

http://www.anthrotech.de/Pages-e/technik-e.html

http://www.steintrikes.com/trike/nomadsport.php


I think you would find that riding a velomobile gives you a better feeling of security in traffic. You *are* bigger and more noticeable, and therefore motor vehicles give you more respect and a wider berth when passing. As long as you are following the rules of the road for cycles as dictated by your location, you should have little trouble. BlueVelo in Toronto is a good place to 'get your feet wet' in understanding how comforting a velomobile is to ride - they'll be happy to give you test rides and answer all your questions. They might even know a few people in Montreal who ride VMs - I'm certain I've seen a few photoblogs of people in that city.

digitalmouse 10-10-11 06:03 AM

A 'blast from the past' - my original tourbike, a late 90's Aprilla racing Mountain bike, turned into a long-distance touring bike. And odd choice for touring, but once I upgraded the gearing, and added seat-post suspension, it was quite fun to ride. This photo is from my first European long-distance tour in 2003 from Oldenburg, Germany to Nottingham, UK (and back - in 2 weeks). 1,780 km round-trip. It was this tour that started the desire to switch to recumbents. I'm second from the left (the cycle gloves should give me away), the others are people I met online in various forums and we did a weekend camping trip in Nottingham:

http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y15...3/packedup.jpg

And before I switched to a more velomobile-like direction for cycling, my 2005 Anthrotech was my main ride for both short and long distance tours:

http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1204/...593_z.jpg?zz=1

http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1126/...64c_z.jpg?zz=1

Simon Cowbell 10-10-11 08:32 AM

Another road-ready Vaya. All stock aside from the Salsa front rack and the Sram X7 crankset. I've left on the 700x42 Contis' because I'm transitioning over from mtb touring and don't quite trust skinny tires yet. When the time comes I know 32s will be a revelation.

https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-A...0/P1030997.JPG


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