Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Touring
Reload this Page >

Planning spring tour with newbie - Where?

Notices
Touring Have a dream to ride a bike across your state, across the country, or around the world? Self-contained or fully supported? Trade ideas, adventures, and more in our bicycle touring forum.

Planning spring tour with newbie - Where?

Old 12-01-10, 02:33 PM
  #1  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
simplygib's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Grants Pass, Oregon
Posts: 677

Bikes: Hard Rock Sport, Peugeot Triathlon, Schwinn Paramount Series 7

Liked 3 Times in 2 Posts
Planning spring tour with newbie - Where?

My new gf has expressed an interest in touring with me this spring, probably starting about mid April. She can be gone one to two months (unlimited for me). I'm trying to figure out where to tour, with this in mind: She is not a cyclist. She's been on a bike maybe 4 times in her life. But she is in good shape, late 30s.

I've been cycling for many years including several long self-supported tours, so I know what to expect on a tour, and she will spend the time between now and then getting used to biking, so that's not what I'm asking about. My question is where should we tour? Considering her experience, I'm thinking good weather, light traffic, flat to maybe moderate hills. A place where we can take it very easy in the beginning until she builds up her stamina would be great. The last thing I want to do is get her riding in heavy rain, heavy traffic, or killer hills before she's ready for that. I really want her to like this experience, so she will be likely to want to do it again.

We are in Southern Oregon but are not opposed to traveling some distance to do this tour. To keep things less complicated and affordable, I'm thinking of staying in the US for this first trip. Camping would be ok but we'll probably be getting a room every few days.

Any suggestions?
simplygib is offline  
Old 12-01-10, 03:07 PM
  #2  
In Real Life
 
Machka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Down under down under
Posts: 52,153

Bikes: Lots

Liked 599 Times in 331 Posts
I would suggest Europe.

Europe has a lots of different terrain options ... for example, the tow paths along the canals between Nancy and Strasbourg in France are lovely. They are paved, flat, and devoid of traffic, and there's a whole network of that sort of thing.

Europe has good train service so if you're touring one area and you decide you'd really like to see a place 200 km away, you don't have to cycle your butts off to get there, you can hop on a train and be there in no time.

Europe has towns and services quite closely placed to each other, so if you set off and 30 km up the road, the weather turns nasty, you can pull into the next town and stop in a cafe till it blows over, or find a place to stay if you'd rather not continue on. You also have the flexibility of planning really short days of riding ... or longer ones as you desire.

In France and Belgium, you can camp or make use of hostels or hotels or B&Bs or whatever you like. One lovely thing about camping in France is breakfast. When you book in, all the places we stayed asked us to choose from a list of pain au chocolat and chocolat croissants, etc. which were then delivered to the campground office and we would head over and pick them up. That's a great way to start the day!!


I would also suggest if she really wants to do this ... that she start riding now and get used to the bicycle.
Machka is offline  
Old 12-01-10, 04:00 PM
  #3  
Godfather of Soul
 
SBRDude's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 1,517

Bikes: 2002 Litespeed Vortex, 2010 Specialized Tricross Expert,2008 Gary Fischer Hi Fi Carbon, 2002 Specialized S-Works hard tail, 1990 Kestrel KM 40

Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
In most places, spring weather is unpredictable, so keep that in mind.

I lived in Tucson for 5 years and the weather there is much more predictably dry. There are lots of places outside of Tucson if you like the desert environment, but I never did any touring or camping, so you'd have to investigate it. The area also has a good mixture of flats and hills and you can often choose to ride the hills or stay on the flat areas.

Another option would be around where I live in Austin and the hill country. More hills out here, however, but better scenery for my tastes. More chances for rain and bad weather here, however, so keep that in mind.
SBRDude is offline  
Old 12-01-10, 04:17 PM
  #4  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Wheat Ridge, CO
Posts: 1,076

Bikes: '93 Bridgestone MB-3, '88 Marinoni road bike, '00 Marinoni Piuma, '01 Riv A/R

Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Since you live in Oregon, why not ride the Pacific Coast route? It's a great ride, you can go more or less as far south as you want (San Francisco, LA or even Mexico), and then catch a bus or train home (or fly home, for that matter).

Europe can be everything Machka says, but there are drawbacks:
1. Flying there and back with bicycles gets more complicated and expensive every year, and bringing camping gear adds to the issues.
2.Dealing with broken bicycles or being lost or sick is difficult enough when you don't speak the language.
3. If your girlfriend decides that she just doesn't like cycle touring (or bicycles in general), you're going to be stuck a long way from home with an unhappy girlfriend.

Do a tour close to home, see how you like it, see how you like traveling together, and then definitely head for Europe (or Southeast Asia, or South America, or Australia, or New Zealand, or any place that looks good on a map). But start out close to home, especially since you've got such good cycle touring right where you are.
markf is offline  
Old 12-01-10, 05:38 PM
  #5  
Senior Member
 
staehpj1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Posts: 11,918

Bikes: Several

Liked 779 Times in 574 Posts
Originally Posted by markf
Since you live in Oregon, why not ride the Pacific Coast route? It's a great ride, you can go more or less as far south as you want (San Francisco, LA or even Mexico), and then catch a bus or train home (or fly home, for that matter).
+1
There are hills, but they aren't too bad. The scenery is good, there is lots of great food, and there are plenty of nice places to stay.
staehpj1 is offline  
Old 12-01-10, 05:50 PM
  #6  
Walmart bike rider
 
gpsblake's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: South Carolina
Posts: 2,120
Liked 29 Times in 24 Posts
well just remember, even while touring, most of your time with her will be off the bicycle, not riding it. Honestly, letting her pick the area is best. And have a bail out plan in case she doesn't want to tour anymore. And if she wants to discontinue the ride, you discontinue the ride without giving her pressure.
gpsblake is offline  
Old 12-01-10, 06:48 PM
  #7  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: San Diego
Posts: 118

Bikes: Specialized Roubaix, Trek 520, Waterford

Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
If you want flat, but pretty countryside, I would look at Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan. Look at Adventure Cycling Maps (adventurecycling.org) for routes.
SanDiegoCyclist is offline  
Old 12-01-10, 07:47 PM
  #8  
Senior Member
 
Newspaperguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: British Columbia, Canada
Posts: 2,206
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
If your girlfriend, a non-cyclist, is interested in doing a cycle tour with you, she's truly an amazing woman. Let her know how much you appreciate her. Every day.

As others have said, let her pick the route and keep the distances modest.

Also, try for a few short overnight excursions between now and then to let her get a feel for what touring will entail. She'll know soon if bike touring will be something she might enjoy. You're best off finding out now rather than when you're several days into a longer trip.
Newspaperguy is offline  
Old 12-01-10, 11:19 PM
  #9  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 439
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
There are a few European countries where language is not a barrier for English speakers. Sweden is one of them. The drivers here are incredibly polite and accomodating to cyclists, bikes very common and there are some beautiful areas full of things to see which sit right on many local and national bike routes most of which are on their own cycle paths next to the road or on smaller roads. The southern parts of Sweden on the east side are somewhat flatter. The north-western sections are the areas that get mountainous. The Sverigeleden (Sweden Trail/Path) itself zig-zags over the whole of Sweden from the town farthest north into Finland and Norway, across sections east and west and down to the southern most points for a total of some 6800 miles.

That said, I do have to agree for a first tour, sticking to the US might be best in case it turns out she hates it or the other complications of flying bikes here. But it might be something to keep in mind for a 3rd or 4th tour if she loves it!
aenlaasu is offline  
Old 12-01-10, 11:25 PM
  #10  
Senior Member
 
Newspaperguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: British Columbia, Canada
Posts: 2,206
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Just wondering how the California wine country would work out for a first tour.
Newspaperguy is offline  
Old 12-02-10, 12:45 AM
  #11  
Life is a fun ride
 
safariofthemind's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Raleigh, NC
Posts: 643
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
+1 on getting her used to cycling near home

Your success chances go up if she has enough miles on her legs prior to the tour, has faced bad weather at least a few times while riding, and has dealt with the frustrations of rude drivers and mechanical breakdowns and flats at least a few times. Touring is also a social activity, so you may get her motivated by riding with groups near your area - the camaraderie is infectious and motivating. Good luck; you are very lucky to have such a woman in your life. It's hard enough finding a partner that likes the same sports you do, to have her want to drop everything for you is most excellent. Treasure her.
safariofthemind is offline  
Old 12-02-10, 03:42 AM
  #12  
In Real Life
 
Machka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Down under down under
Posts: 52,153

Bikes: Lots

Liked 599 Times in 331 Posts
Originally Posted by markf
Europe can be everything Machka says, but there are drawbacks:
1. Flying there and back with bicycles gets more complicated and expensive every year, and bringing camping gear adds to the issues.
2.Dealing with broken bicycles or being lost or sick is difficult enough when you don't speak the language.
3. If your girlfriend decides that she just doesn't like cycle touring (or bicycles in general), you're going to be stuck a long way from home with an unhappy girlfriend.
1. Flying can be challenging, but it is easier with two people, and there are inexpensive options out there as discussed in another recent thread.

2. If the bicycle breaks, chances are you'll be quite near public transportation so you can finish the trip by train. If you're sick, go to a Dr (get travel insurance before you go, but even without it, from what I've heard from friends who have had to go to a Dr in France) Drs there are inexpensive and quite good. Regarding the language ... if you travel through Scotland, England, and Wales, most of the people speak English. If you go to France with just a little bit of knowledge of the French language, you'll find that the people are very friendly and helpful, and many of them will want to practice their English on you.

3. If the girlfriend decides she doesn't like cycletouring or bicycles in general ... the beautiful thing about Europe is that you can stop cycling, make a certain hostel or hotel your headquarters, and do day trips by train. She can go shopping, look at museums, or whatever. And then take the train to another spot and do the same thing there. If the OP still wants to cycle, he could go off on day rides while she browses through the town or whatever.

There are lots of options like that in Europe because there is a good train network and towns are close together, whereas there are many places in North America (and Australia) where if you start on a cycling tour, you have to finish the cycling tour in order to get back because towns are some distance apart, and there isn't a good public transportation network.


So wherever the OP chooses to go, I have a few important tips for riding with someone who is new to touring ...

1) Plan days off into the schedule. Plan a schedule where you ride to ride 3 days and then take 1 day off. Or plan to ride to a spot where you will do a hub-and-spoke style tour so that she might have the option of taking a day off while you ride.

2) Plan short riding days.

3) Make sure you've got a bail-out plan. Make sure there is public transportation or car rentals available at certain points along the route. Make sure there is room in the schedule for a few extra days off. Make sure your schedule is flexible so that if you discover that you will be riding into a strong wind for a second day in a row, maybe you can go another direction instead. Or if it is pouring rain, maybe you'll just stay put for a day because your schedule is flexible enough so that you don't have to rush to arrive at a pre-booked accommodation.
Machka is offline  
Old 12-02-10, 01:43 PM
  #13  
djb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Montreal Canada
Posts: 13,326
Liked 1,003 Times in 824 Posts
only four times on a bike....I dunno, but without getting into destinations, I would really want the lady and you to do day rides, short at first and gradually increase as you go. I see this as a necessity as there are so many things that will be new to her, from the physical, to just being on a road with cars and trucks whamming by you at 60mph--these are not trivial concerns. And I would even suggest safety concerns (specially with traffic, add onto that how weird a bike is with gear on it, even if she has very little)
Not to mention how much fricken harder it is going up hills with any amount of weight. My wife is pretty game for biking, but she isnt a strong rider and hills are ok if she has no added weight on her bike.

Having done the West Coast....yes its a very pretty ride, but I always said that its not for someone who is skittish (traffic at times, narrow bits) and you know, I did that trip the summer after I biked nearly the whole Pyrenees east to west, and the Pacific route is no easy trip hills wise. No, they are not (mostly) super high, but I recall lots and lots and lots up down up down up down....

we havent even touched on teh bike choice, making sure it fits her, saddle choice, all stuff that is hard for a beginner to know what is good or not. I mean, lets face it, when you two start riding even short day trips, she is going to be sore here and there and here and there. Its normal. The gradual and regular riding together next spring would be so important. Being in Oregon, its not like you can ride all winter.

seems to me that for this to be a success, a well thought out gradual introduction to biking will be the key. The suggestions already made about places vis a vis other interests (ie Europe) lots of break days etc , all are excellent. Obviously you want this to be a good experience for her (and hence for you) so perhaps you can mix in biking with some neat "touristy, visiting" stuff that wont make "the trip" seem like boot camp for her.

I think I have repeated what others have said already, but it seems to me that thoughtful planning will be the key here so its a good experience for her.
djb is offline  
Old 12-02-10, 01:49 PM
  #14  
sniffin' glue
 
zoltani's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Seattle
Posts: 3,177

Bikes: Surly crosscheck ssfg, Custom vintage french racing bike, Bruce Gordon Rock & Road

Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Oregon is an amazing state for touring. When my wife got interested in touring we did overnight trips first, weekend trips and so forth, slowly building up to a longer tour. She found out she enjoyed touring, bought her a better bike and now we love touring together.

As far as destinations go I'd say....OREGON! Loved it, both me and my wife. Every pass you climb over offers drastically different scenery, and the people were really nice. Of course, since you live there you may want to get out, but that's my suggestion. Otherwise the coast is awesome too!
zoltani is offline  
Old 12-02-10, 02:51 PM
  #15  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
simplygib's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Grants Pass, Oregon
Posts: 677

Bikes: Hard Rock Sport, Peugeot Triathlon, Schwinn Paramount Series 7

Liked 3 Times in 2 Posts
Thanks everyone for the advice. As I stated originally, I prefer to stay in the US for this trip. Europe or other international destinations would be great for future trips, but for this one I want to stay relatively close to home, while the gf is getting her feet wet.

Pacific Coast - did that one myself two years ago. I loved it, but wouldn't want to take the gf on it for the first tour. Hwy 1 in CA has zero shoulder much of the time and the hills are very steep in spots, even if they are quite short. And there are lots and lots of them. Once she gets some tour miles under her belt, and assuming she enjoys it, we can consider that for the future. But for this first tour I'm looking for less vertical, less traffic, and preferably more shoulder.

Tucson - my first-ever tour ended there. I love that area, and love the desert. I think that's a real possibility. How hot can I expect it to be around there in April? I'll need to research routes around there, but I'm thinking it sounds promising.

CA wine country - another definite possibility. I lived within an hour of there most of my life so know the area well. Thanks for the reminder.

Newspaperguy and Safariofthemind - thanks for the observations about the gf. She truly is an amazing woman, and I feel very lucky to have met her. Cycle touring is at the top of the list of things I enjoy doing, and for her to want to join me on one of those (her idea, not mine) is huge in my book. Even if it turns out it isn't her thing, I greatly appreciate her willingness to give it a try. And yes, I've made sure she knows that.

Thanks again for all the suggestions.
simplygib is offline  
Old 12-02-10, 03:05 PM
  #16  
eternalvoyage
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 2,256
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by simplygib
My new gf has expressed an interest in touring with me this spring, probably starting about mid April. She can be gone one to two months (unlimited for me). I'm trying to figure out where to tour, with this in mind: She is not a cyclist. She's been on a bike maybe 4 times in her life. But she is in good shape, late 30s.

I've been cycling for many years including several long self-supported tours, so I know what to expect on a tour, and she will spend the time between now and then getting used to biking, so that's not what I'm asking about. My question is where should we tour? Considering her experience, I'm thinking good weather, light traffic, flat to maybe moderate hills. A place where we can take it very easy in the beginning until she builds up her stamina would be great. The last thing I want to do is get her riding in heavy rain, heavy traffic, or killer hills before she's ready for that. I really want her to like this experience, so she will be likely to want to do it again.

We are in Southern Oregon but are not opposed to traveling some distance to do this tour. To keep things less complicated and affordable, I'm thinking of staying in the US for this first trip. Camping would be ok but we'll probably be getting a room every few days.

Any suggestions?


One suggestion would be to take some steps toward ironing out any compatibility issues or potential compatibility issues, before leaving. And find a way of resolving issues that might arise while on tour. Skill in that area is worthwhile having along. You will be spending a lot of time together, and things will come up.

Also, if your paces are different, it's worth resolving that one properly.

Making the experience of you (you will probably be the main experience) a good one is worth a high-priority position. Same with your experience of her. Your own side of it -- your own attitudes and thoughts, actions, words, and experiences -- are where you have the most traction (it might be harder to be responsible for her side of things, or in control there), and there is a lot you can do to make it a good trip for both of you.

There seems to be a certain danger in putting too much stress on geography. It can be important too, but there are other things in the mix that are often overlooked but still very important in determining the quality of the travel and the relationship.

If you can keep the relationship on a good or very good level, you can enjoy almost anything together.

Where to go? There are so many factors. You might check out some of the tour accounts and pictures over on CGOAB. Turkey might be worth considering. Much of California is beautiful that time of year. The coast is a great ride, but check on likely weather conditions. If you don't like fog or rain, you might want to check weather.com and some other sites for 10-day forecasts.

What do you both really enjoy doing?

You might consider finding ways to make the experience of riding delightful for her -- not just something she has gotten used to, but something that she actually and truly enjoys doing.

For physical beauty, it's hard to beat the American West.

There are some quiet back roads in California you and she might enjoy. You could do a set of flat-country tours and loops, and use some other transport to get over the passes, and connect the flatter sections.

The Santa Ynez Valley is beautiful that time of year. You could find a series of great tours within California, and then find a way to connect them. Some of the Amtrak trains will let you just wheel your bike on the train and put it in a bike rack (you can do this in Davis, for example, and they are quite used to it because of all the students at the University of California, Davis who use bikes -- you might include a visit to the bike barn there, and the arboretum, and just a ride around the campus and surrounding area, which is one of the most bike-friendly in the country).

There are many quiet backroads -- you could base the tour on these.

There are quiet farm roads through the Central Valley and the Salinas Valley. There are some very good, authentic Mexican restaurants in that area (King City, for example). Some of the California Missions are also worth a look. It's almost like being in another country in some of those towns.

You could do part of the coast, maybe just from Monterey/Carmel to Morro Bay, or some other segment or segments. If you avoid traveling there on the weekends, the traffic won't be bad that time of year.

From Morro Bay it is a nice ride to San Luis Obispo, another college town with an Amtrak station.

That area, around Morro Bay, is worth at least a couple of days' exploration.

There is a *great* bike path that goes through Isla Vista (from the University of Calif., Santa Barbara) and much of Santa Barbara. Highly recommended ride, and gentle too. The beaches in that area are very fine.

From Ventura there is another great bike path to Ojai, which is a beautiful small town nestled in a valley surrounded by mountains and recreational lands.

The climb up 33 north from Ojai is best avoided (except the first segment through Wheeler Gorge -- which is dramatic and gently uphill, and which has some beautiful campsites along the river -- and before the steep part begins climbing up to the summit); but it's easy to take one of the alternatives. The road up through Upper Ojai and on to Santa Paula is beautiful and usually not busy.

The coast ride from Ventura or Oxnard down to Malibu isn't bad if you do it when the traffic is light. Once you get to Malibu, the traffic picks up. But there are some paths along the ocean from there south that are actually very nice riding. You have to do a bit of research to stay on the good routes, but it isn't as bad as some people say. It can be very enjoyable and level, with miles of perfect, wide beaches.

If you go that way, be sure to pay special attention to finding the best route through the area around San Pedro. Avoid Wilmington like the plague. Try to stay along the ocean.

Look into taking some side trips out to the islands down there. You can camp on some of the Channel Islands, and there are boats that regularly go out that way. It isn't expensive, and I would not miss the opportunity. Beautiful island camping, and an exotic touch for the tour. Some of the boats depart from Ventura harbor, near the Channel Islands Museum. McGrath Beach has a nice campground, and is nearby. https://www.channel.islands.national-...om/camping.htm

You might also check out Calalina. It's been a long time since I went there, but a friend has said that it's still a nice trip (about twenty-seven miles across the sea). https://www.visitcatalinaisland.com/t...rs/Camping.php

If you continue south, there are some stretches where there is quite a bit of traffic (the Pacific Coast Highway, or PCH, is often thick with traffic). Unless -- and I think this is a good strategy or trick to have up your sleeve -- you hit it at a very light hour. Say three or four in the morning, or early on Sunday.

Be sure to check out this couple's trip [they used this (Sunday morning) strategy successfully when crossing the border and going through Tijuana on their way to Baja] -- this is one of the very best touring accounts around (one of the all-time favorites, according to an editor of that magazine), and there are some hints in it about cycling successfully as a couple -- my suggestion would be to print out the whole series, all seven parts (plus the follow-up article on long-distance touring gear), give a copy to your girlfriend, and make one for yourself. You could share the experience of reading it, and maybe discuss it, maybe over dinner somewhere -- or whatever; it would probably help to establish common ground and shared understanding in relation to touring, which can be very helpful. It's an excellent read and an inspiring trip, and I think you would enjoy it:

[It's over at adventurecycling.org; will post the URLs as soon as I get a chance]

Last edited by Niles H.; 12-02-10 at 04:08 PM.
Niles H. is offline  
Old 12-02-10, 03:50 PM
  #17  
Godfather of Soul
 
SBRDude's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 1,517

Bikes: 2002 Litespeed Vortex, 2010 Specialized Tricross Expert,2008 Gary Fischer Hi Fi Carbon, 2002 Specialized S-Works hard tail, 1990 Kestrel KM 40

Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by simplygib
Tucson - my first-ever tour ended there. I love that area, and love the desert. I think that's a real possibility. How hot can I expect it to be around there in April? I'll need to research routes around there, but I'm thinking it sounds promising.
April is usually nice and not hot yet. The hot stuff always starts by May 10th or 15th.

Also, I forgot if you said if she likes to camp. If you're going to be camping on your tour and she's inexperienced, you might do some winter camping to make sure she's onboard with all that. Not sure what the Oregon coast is like for that in the winter, but maybe it's mild enough to not be too wintry.
SBRDude is offline  
Old 12-02-10, 03:52 PM
  #18  
eternalvoyage
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 2,256
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Here are the URLs mentioned above:

https://adventurecycling.org/resources/unchained1.pdf

https://adventurecycling.org/resources/unchained2.pdf

https://adventurecycling.org/resources/unchained3.pdf

https://adventurecycling.org/resources/unchained4.pdf

https://adventurecycling.org/resources/unchained5.pdf

https://adventurecycling.org/resources/unchained6.pdf

https://adventurecycling.org/resources/unchained7.pdf

https://adventurecycling.org/resource...helonghaul.pdf

enjoy
Niles H. is offline  
Old 12-02-10, 05:09 PM
  #19  
17yrold in 64yrold body
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Northern CA
Posts: 922
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
If you ,like the Tucson area, look at Sierra Vista AZ. Near Tombstone and a little off the 'beaten path' it is a nice place to ride. My riding buddy's wife is from there, and we spent Thanksgiving there a few years ago, and I had a great time. Low traffic volume, nice roads, and great weather. March/April should be even better.
badamsjr is offline  
Old 12-02-10, 10:04 PM
  #20  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
simplygib's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Grants Pass, Oregon
Posts: 677

Bikes: Hard Rock Sport, Peugeot Triathlon, Schwinn Paramount Series 7

Liked 3 Times in 2 Posts
Niles mentioning Santa Barbara reminded me that I am attending my nephew's graduation from UCSB in June. So I'm thinking, why not plan on ending the trip there at about that time? Maybe starting in El Paso.

I quickly threw this route together. It's just a hypothetical thing right now - not sure about these roads yet, etc., but just wanted to try to put something together without too many steep hills (although there are plenty of hills in this route, the gradients don't appear to be too bad). https://ridewithgps.com/routes/236108

Any glaring problems?
simplygib is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
Chr0m0ly
Touring
42
10-16-18 09:46 PM
Newspaperguy
Touring
23
01-03-11 11:18 AM
aprosemu
Touring
10
06-03-10 04:43 PM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Your Privacy Choices -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.