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What pedal do you tour with?

Old 02-03-11, 10:53 AM
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What pedal do you tour with?

I'm debating if I want to use my mountain bike shoes and SPD "eggbeater" pedals or regular platform pedals (possibly the grip king pedal). I can ride for a day in the MTB shoes without discomfort but I feel that after a few days, my feet will be killing me. I have a history of foot pain in shoes with a stiff sole or siding.

How many of you ride with platform or toe clips? How much different is it than clipless pedals for touring. I figure since I won't be riding particularly fast, that platform would be the way to go for being able to walk around a city or hike a mountain during the tour.

Oh, and by the way. You can't walk far with cycling shoes, MTB or road. The still sole won't allow you discomfort more than a few minutes of walking.
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Old 02-03-11, 11:27 AM
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The right answer will be different for different folks or even the same folks on different tours.

Originally Posted by Lamabb
I'm debating if I want to use my mountain bike shoes and SPD "eggbeater" pedals or regular platform pedals (possibly the grip king pedal). I can ride for a day in the MTB shoes without discomfort but I feel that after a few days, my feet will be killing me. I have a history of foot pain in shoes with a stiff sole or siding.

How many of you ride with platform or toe clips? How much different is it than clipless pedals for touring. I figure since I won't be riding particularly fast, that platform would be the way to go for being able to walk around a city or hike a mountain during the tour.
My preference is spd pedals and Sidi MTB shoes (I like the cheaper Giau model). My rationale is that I will be spending way more hours riding than walking so I wear shores that are best suited to riding.

Originally Posted by Lamabb
Oh, and by the way. You can't walk far with cycling shoes, MTB or road. The still sole won't allow you discomfort more than a few minutes of walking.
Definitely not what I have found. Hiking a mile or two in my Sidis is not a problem for me. My Trans America companions found the same. We did put on Crocs sometimes for hikes for a change of pace.

I agree that it is nice to have something else if hiking more than a couple miles. How important that is will depend on the amount of hiking involved. This year my daughter and I did more hiking of longer distances in Yosemite and did decide it was worth buying a pair of trail runners from the park store, but we wouldn't have done that for shorter hikes or for a single longish one. Since we were spending a week in Yosemite and hiking every day it was well worth it, but this is not the norm for me. If I know up front that I will be hiking longer distances fairly often I'll take my trail runners, but usually I limit hikes to 2 or 3 miles and 5 or more in a pinch isn't that bad.
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Old 02-03-11, 11:38 AM
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Originally Posted by Lamabb
Oh, and by the way. You can't walk far with cycling shoes, MTB or road. The still sole won't allow you discomfort more than a few minutes of walking.
Maybe you're using the wrong shoes.

I've found the old Shimano MT31s to be walkable for miles. Medium stiff sole. I now have PI X-alps that seem to be designed to be stiffer from the cleat back, but more walkable due to the shape and flexibility of the sole in the toe area. Since you're considering clips or platforms, you're obviously not concerned with having a stiff sole anyway.

FWIW, I use the above mentioned shoes with Speedplay Frogs.
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Old 02-03-11, 12:39 PM
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I really like the grip kings, great pedals and I can wear regular shoes.
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Old 02-03-11, 12:44 PM
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I use the second set down, of shimano pedals listed on this page

https://www.sheldonbrown.com/harris/pedals.html
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Old 02-03-11, 12:48 PM
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I've used clipless pedals with Shimano Mtn shoes in the USA, but in Europe use toe clips with a Lake cycling shoe (the model name I can't recall. Wish I could because I would love to have another pair of those shoes. Apparently they don't make that particular model anymore, though.) The longer I tour, the more I'm favoring toe clips over clipless. I have found the Lake to be a better shoe for the ancillary walking customary with a bike ride, but I always carry a comfortable pair of walking shoes for evenings or other extended periods off-bike.
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Old 02-03-11, 12:53 PM
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Shimano 520s with Nashbar cycling sandals. Rain or shine. I absolutely love clipless (for everything from touring to downhill mountain biking) and the 520s have proved to be pretty more than adequate and quite inexpensive, although I do love the feel of Times as well.
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Old 02-03-11, 01:12 PM
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I use mountain cage pedals (I believe mine are MKS touring?) and PowerGrips-- those strap like contraptions. I feel like I get the best of both worlds and only have to bring one pair of shoes. I mostly do off-road touring and hiking is a normal leisure activity.

I see nothing wrong with using clipless pedals/shoes for the same reasoning Staehpj1 mentions-- you're on the bike for great stretches of time. Part of me wants to go clipless but I just haven't done it. I'm off the bike a great deal too....
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Old 02-03-11, 01:43 PM
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Originally Posted by Lamabb
I'm debating if I want to use my mountain bike shoes and SPD "eggbeater" pedals or regular platform pedals (possibly the grip king pedal). I can ride for a day in the MTB shoes without discomfort but I feel that after a few days, my feet will be killing me. I have a history of foot pain in shoes with a stiff sole or siding.

Oh, and by the way. You can't walk far with cycling shoes, MTB or road. The still sole won't allow you discomfort more than a few minutes of walking.
Diff'rent strokes...

I like a good, stiff sole. A floppy sole hurts my feed after 25 miles, even with platform pedals. Sounds like your experience differs, but riding up to 10 hours a day didn't hurt my feet as long as the shoes weren't too tight. My preference is Sidi mountain shoes with Speedplay Frog pedals.

I walked up to a few miles some days pushing the bike up some darned steep hills and into wind. If that's not "far" according to your definition, maybe you need to plan to take some other walking shoes along.

There were/are a few tricks I picked up that may help. First, get off the bike every once in a while! 5-10 minutes every hour or two changes the pressure points a bit, gets the blood flowing, and relaxes overworked muscles. Second, get yourself some good insoles if what's in your bike shoes don't cut it. Superfeet Orange are good for me. Third, adjust your shoes early. If you're cramping your toes or midsole, once it really gets going you'll need to take the rest of the day off. Loosen the front or middle strap at the first twinge (while you're off the bike, see hint #1).
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Old 02-03-11, 01:55 PM
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A recessed SPD cleat. On long tours I take a pair of shoes, and a pair of sandals. Both pair are SPD compatable, and both serve as my only footwear for my entire tour. That means I have time off the bike where I have to walk about some. Recessed cleats are best for those times when walking like a duck is not so good.
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Old 02-03-11, 02:09 PM
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Used Campagnolo's steel quill Record pedals
and a pair of Fisher double stainless toe clips.
they have a taller toe box height, than Christophe, etc.

Shoe repair guy helped me make a slit cleat that was recessed , in the shoe sole
wide and hourglass shaped for easy angle adjustment, and kept toes back from the
toe clip contact..

some stuff you cannot just buy, you have to do some DIY.
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Old 02-03-11, 02:58 PM
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I'm old school and use 80s vintage MTB pedals with toe clips and straps, coupled with Shimano SPD MTB shoes (without SPD cleats). It's interesting to see how much these pedals are now going for on Ebay. Seems to be a resurgence in people who appreciate a high-quality standard pedal. I've seen SunTour XC Pro pedals go for over $150 a pair, which I think is kind of silly. I have two sets of these on my tandem, and if they keep going up in price I may just have to sell them off and buy something cheaper! :-) They are very nice pedals, though. I also have SR "Low Fat" Compe pedals on two of my bikes.
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Old 02-03-11, 03:43 PM
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Another user of SPD pedals and Sidi MTB shoes here. I had some Specialized MTB shoes that absolutely had to have an aftermarket insole, but the Sidis are fine stock. I've had them for about 10 years and maybe 40,000 miles. They show essentially no wear, though I have replaced one buckle and the velcro. Nice that they make parts for them. I take trail runners for hiking. I crush them down with compression straps to take up less space.
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Old 02-03-11, 04:54 PM
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Platform pedals (MKS Sylvan) and light hikers. My Sidi MTB shoes are way too stiff and uncomfortable to use for long distance touring. I want to try sandals next.
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Old 02-03-11, 05:16 PM
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Some brand of platforms that grip a sole well, and running shoes. 40-60 miles/day with no foot/knee problems at all. Moved from spd's a year or more ago after having some knee pains and hot foot problems. Whole lot better for me in most respects. Including the shoe issues.
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Old 02-03-11, 06:57 PM
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I like Shimano M520 SPD pedals. I wore a pair of Shimano mountain/touring shoes (MT-31) on my last tour; they look like regular shoes but the sole isn't quite stiff enough. Next time, I'll use my Specialized BG Comp mountain bike shoes. They don't look as much like a regular shoe, but they're supremely comfortable over long distances...
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Old 02-03-11, 08:19 PM
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Platform pedals, and sandals for comfort.
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Old 02-03-11, 08:23 PM
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I like my spd's and sidi's I carry some other shoes for extended walking.
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Old 02-04-11, 01:05 AM
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I can't use SPD pedals. I use regular cage pedals with a plate on the top so that they don't dig into feet when wearing softer shoes. And straps and clips.

I am intrigued by flypaper pedals. Not as an MTB thing. The idea of having drive and connection without needing to be locked in any particular relationship to the pedal would be great.
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Old 02-04-11, 01:39 AM
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i always used spd sandals (original 2-strap shimanos, lake, nashbar, and keen, in that order of preference) with shimano 747 mtb pedals. i'll probably start using crank brothers candy pedals because i got some for cheap. sometimes i bring off-bike shoes, and sometimes i just wear my sandals for everything. i find that spd sandals tend to be stiff-enough for riding, but lousy for walking despite the recessed cleat. they usually drain and ventilate well, which i consider important in a travelling shoe.
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Old 02-04-11, 04:37 AM
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MKS Sylvian touring with Christophe metal toe clips.
Most of the time I wear some old school athletics shoe (Hi Tech Silver Shadow). Not the stiffest shoe around but not floppy either. I can ride long distance and do big mountains in them.
When it comes to the stiffness of the sole, the more force you use to pedal, the stiffer shoe you need. I have a fast spinning style with little force.
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Old 02-04-11, 06:14 AM
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I've used Shimano and Lake shoes with Frog pedals for touring and have always taken a pair of walking shoes. Last year I bought some Keen sandals and took them on a week long tour as my only shoes and found that they worked well both on the bike and off.
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Old 02-04-11, 07:34 AM
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In the past I used SPD type pedals (Ritchey V4, their black two sided MTB ones) and Pearl Izumi shoes. As soon as I got to the campsite, I took off the bike shoes and put on trail runner shoes. The bike shoes would be comfortable for a 30 mile ride, but after about 60 miles the shoes were not as comfortable. Used Superfeet insoles in the shoes, they helped somewhat.

But, I recently bought another pair of Shimano M324 pedals (I already have a pair of those on my foldup), platform on one side and SPD clipless on the other side. This way I will be able to bike with SPD shoes or with trail runner shoes. The main purpose behind this change is not for sole stiffness, it is because I would rather wear cycle shoes on dry days and other shoes on rainy days. But, I might try changing shoes mid day if my feet are sore.
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Old 02-04-11, 10:42 AM
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I use SPD pedals and MTB shoes. I find the shoes to be fine for extended hikes (10 or more miles) but prefer not to do too much hiking in them since it wears out the cleats on rocky terrain. But for touring I only take one pair of shoes.
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Old 02-04-11, 06:51 PM
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This is FYI
I bough a set of pedals that they use on exercise equipment in the gym. hey have an adjustable plastic strap. I can use any street, or hiking, shoe i have. Also it has a wide platform for my flat wide feet. I remove the counter weight. for about $15.00. You can get them with 1/2 threat and put adapters to widen the Q factor if needed or they also come in 9/16 thread. I have them on a hybrid. I use my Crocks with them and they work great
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